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Edexcel GCSE English Literature Unit 1: Understanding Prose (Higher Tier) Watch

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    She also told us that the Poetry test 3 days later might be about ' Zero hour ' and ' Living Space '
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    My English Teacher
    Ah kl thanks
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    She also told us that the Poetry test 3 days later might be about ' Zero hour ' and ' Living Space '
    Is living space for the unseen poetry, I'm doing clashes and collisions so ill be doing one different to you but the unseen the same.
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    Yes I think, the question is going to be most likely ask you to compare both of them.
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    Yes I think, the question is going to be most likely ask you to compare both of them.
    Oh yh my teacher mentioned a comparison question but he was so poor I learnt it all at home haha and forgot he said that.
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    guys could a relationship pop up for OMAM
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    (Original post by A*GLORYHUNTER)
    guys could a relationship pop up for OMAM
    Most Likely not, since it has all ready popped up before as a GCSE Question
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    Most Likely not, since it has all ready popped up before as a GCSE Question
    Yea so most likely slim im going practise quite a few A* Essays how about you (Ofcourse ill revise all characters too)
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    (Original post by A*GLORYHUNTER)
    Yea so most likely slim im going practise quite a few A* Essays how about you (Ofcourse ill revise all characters too)
    I've been studying the mark schemes and trying to get into the habit of answering my question in a certain way, making sure to hit AO1 andn AO4, in the past i've done really good essay but didn't really touch AO1 so got a bad mark.

    Basically just get into the habit of bs'ing and you'll do fine haha. Nice name btw
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    (Original post by A*GLORYHUNTER)
    Yea so most likely slim im going practise quite a few A* Essays how about you (Ofcourse ill revise all characters too)
    Slim has not come up before as a Question, neither has Loneliness. So I would recommend revising both of these. I am jotting key mommnets or facts about the Character of Slim, a Few quotes and doing the same more less for the significance of Loneliness which was displayed mainly by crooks and Curleys wife.
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    Slim has not come up before as a Question, neither has Loneliness. So I would recommend revising both of these. I am jotting key mommnets or facts about the Character of Slim, a Few quotes and doing the same more less for the significance of Loneliness which was displayed mainly by crooks and Curleys wife.
    Yeah I reckon there's a good chance of loneliness coming up since it's such a significant theme in the novel. Also idk if your school is different but do we bring in our own clean copy of OMAM and Animal farm or whatever you're doing for part A, or are we provided with a copy?
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    At my school they will provide everyone with a clean copy.
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    (Original post by James Gregors)
    At my school they will provide everyone with a clean copy.
    It's likely mine will do the same then, but my mum was just naturally going crazy assuming I needed my own copy haha.
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    This is what I have been doing:

    Character Analysis of Slim

    Slim is described always in terms of dignity and majesty. When he first comes into the bunkhouse, he moves "with a majesty achieved only by royalty and master craftsmen. He was a jerk-line skinner, the prince of the ranch, capable of driving ten, sixteen, even twenty mules with a single line to the leaders." Slim is tall, ageless, and an expert in his job. His voice is the voice of rationalism.

    When Carlson suggests killing Candy's dog, Candy appeals to Slim as the final authority.
    Slim is so respected and admired on the ranch that even Curley listens to him. When Lennie smashes Curley's hand, Slim is the one who intercedes and tells Curley he will not have George and Lennie fired. Slim understands Curley's fear of ridicule, and he uses that fear to help George and Lennie. Slim also inspires confidences because he is not judgmental. When George first meets Slim, George tells him about Lennie's troubles in Weed.

    George senses in Slim a person of intelligence and empathy who will not be mean to Lennie, make fun of him, or take advantage of him.
    Slim is the only one on the ranch who appreciates the difficulty of George's position. He understands the constant oversight George must exercise in watching Lennie and keeping him out of trouble. It is Slim, in the end, who suggests that George did the right thing in killing Lennie mercifully. He explains the alternative: "An s'pose they lock him up an' strap him down and put him in a cage. That ain't no good, George."
    Slim is present at every crucial juncture in the story: the death of Candy's dog, the smashing of Curley's hand, finding the body of Curley's wife, at the pool after George has shot Lennie. In each case, there is violence or the threat of it. Each time Slim helps make the assessment to do what is merciful or what is right.

    Notes
    · Slim is the jerk line skinner (lead mule-team driver) at the ranch. He is excellent at his job.
    · He is the natural leader at the ranch. Everyone respects his views and looks up to him.
    · He has a quiet dignity: he doesn't need to assert himself to have authority.
    · "there was a gravity in his manner and a quiet so profound that all talked stopped when he spoke. His authority was so great that his word was taken on any subject, be it politics or love."
    · He understands the relationship between George and Lennie. He helps George at the end and reassures George that he did the right thing.



    How is the character of Slim important to the novel as a whole?
    Slim is significant to providing a contrast to the depression and discrimination of the other characters on the ranch. His consistency makes him a tool of comparison and gives him a unique judge-like authority.

    Slim is important to contextualise other characters on the ranch. Because Slim is describes with such zealous descriptions such as ‘God-like eyes’ he is quickly established as a character with an excellent moral conduct. In contrast, Curley is described as ‘alla time picking scraps with big guys’. With Slim, we can constantly compare characters with him, to intensify their weaknesses. For example, Slim has an ‘authority so great that his word was taken on any subject’, whilst Curley ‘wore high-heeled boots’ to superficially show power. This comparison highlights Curley’s inner insecurity as we see he has to dress for respect whilst this comes to Slim naturally. Slim is also a character assessor on the ranch – his judgement on Lennie is that ‘he’s not mean’. All the time leading up to this, we as readers have probably already arrived to this opinion, but by an authoritive figure like Slim repeating it we can be sure of the innocence of Lennie’s actions.

    Furthermore, Slim’s power on the ranch makes him a voice of justice throughout the novel. Because justice is so subjective, Slim’s views provide an objective way of evaluating George’s latter decisions in the novel. We are initially surprised when we learn that Slim ‘drowned four of [the puppies] right off’, as it would be seen as a form of murder. However, his initial God-like descriptions deter us from seeing the wrong in his actions – but we consider that if he had not done this, the other puppies would have all starved. Through Slim justifying the doctrine of double effect, we realise how practicalities can take precedence over ideals. The novel was written in a time when resources were scarce and compromises had to be made – such as fitting into the dismal life of a migrant worker, so Slim’s actions are enforced as acceptable. This means that we are likely to support George’s decision later on in the novel when he decides to kill Lennie. George has to balance the pain of being the one to shoot his closest friend with the regret of ‘[letting] em hurt Lennie’. George can look to Slim’s example and come around to supporting double effect and accepting that Lennie’s death was inevitable. In a way, Slim’s judgements foreshadow the end of the novel, as we always anticipate that Lennie will get into trouble and the only way to end the cycle of moving ranch to ranch would be to kill him. However, even after the murder, Slim is unchanged – he still supports George and understands him, reassuring him and saying ‘never you mind, a guy got to sometimes’. Slim is defying the characteristic 1930s breakdown of trusts and friendships – it was a time where understandings were jeopardised and distances were created, but Slim reveals a true understanding of the complexities of George’s decision.

    Slim gives hope to the readers of the novel in many ways. It is set is bleak times where discrimination was widespread – whilst Crooks is racially segregated against, Curley’s wide is a victim of sexism. However, he is the only character who looks past these things and treats everybody equally. Whereas for most people, if Crooks says something ‘why it’s just a ****** saying it’, Slim comes into his room, which shows he is a man ready to form relationships with people at the lowest levels of society. Whereas all the other men call Curley’s wife a ‘tramp’ for her flirtacious, desperate state, Slim can empathise with her desires and addresses her as ‘hey beautiful’. So whilst other characters aim to mistreat others to feel more powerful (e.g. Curley’s wife threatening to lynch Crooks}, Slim reassures us that there are more morally righteous people. In a way, whilst other characters such as Crooks see the American Dream failing, as society limits his potential due to racial code of the time, Slim has already achieved his dream. He is the successful ‘jerkline skinner’ who is looked up to, someone who has made a positive identity and impression on the ranch and who has achieved prosperity. He has therefore demonstrated that even migrant workers can achieve a somewhat fulfilled life if they look past the negatives. Slim is stuck in the same turbulent times, so Steinbeck uses his success to highlight an optimistic possibility for migrant workers who may read the novel.

    As we have seen, Slim is significant in always being that constant, unchanging yardstick that highlights other characters’ weaknesses, but also strives to enliven other people’s lives through little interactions that other characters lack. His basic manners being seen as ‘good’ accentuates a weakened society of mistrust and broken communication, but Slim gives hope to readers all the same.
    Notes
    Slim supports George after he shot Lennie, you could say that he supports George because maybe Slim has had to do something like this, which you could justify using the idea that Slim only listens, and doesn't talk about himself; Slim represents redemption or penance in the novel.




    Key Points to remember about Slim!

    Slim presents dignity and majesty
    Slim represents authority on the ranch
    Slim is respected and admired by the ranch workers
    Slim is present at every crucial juncture in the story
    Slim is the only one on the ranch who appreciates the difficulty of George's position
    Slim a person of intelligence and empathy who will not be mean to Lennie, make fun of him, or take advantage of him.

    “Steinbeck uses Slim almost as an idol; by presenting Slim in an overwhelmingly positive light he encourages his readers, both of the 1930s and of modern times, to stringently follow one's own moral code and to uphold social standards. I believe that Steinbeck is very successful in persuading the reader to join in his personal opinion. This presentation is contrasted with the rather negative portrayal of Carlson who is conversely shown to have nothing in the way of ethics.”


    Key points to know and understand about Slim in the Book “Of Mice and Men”

    He shows understanding towards George and Lennie; especially George’s position at the end of the book, when George shoots Lennie in the back of the head, Slim reassures him that he did the right thing. “ An s’pose they lock him up an’ strap him down and outhim in a cage”
    Slim is described of having much dignity throughout the story and most importantly at crucial moments.
    Slim is like the jerk line skinner (the lead mule-team driver) at the ranch. He is excellent at his job too. Unlike Curley who purposely tries to impress the ranch workers, for slim it comes naturally he is able to understand the position of the ranch workers even George. Furthermore George also senses a person of intelligence and empathy who will not be mean towards Lennie, make fun of him or even take advantage of him in any way.



    What is the Significance of Loneliness in OMAM
    Loneliness is an important theme in Of Mice and Men. Two characters who are extremely lonely are Crooks and Curley's wife.
    Curley's wife lives an isolated life. She is the only woman mentioned in the novel. She flirts with the ranch hands due to her loneliness. She only dreams of the time she could have been an actress:
    But she is pathetically lonely and had once had dreams of being a movie star.
    She is married to a possessive, jealous type man. She does not feel loved. She feels as if she is a possession:
    Curley's wife (as the boss's son's flirtatious wife, she is not identified by any other name) wanders around the ranch searching for some human contact. She is stereotyped by the men as a "tart." Indeed, she plays the vamp, which enrages her jealous husband. George tells Lennie to avoid her, calling her "poison" and "jailbait."
    She is so desperately lonely until she reaches out to Lennie. She is so all alone until she finds herself spending time with Lennie. She teases Lennie by asking him to feel of her hair. Lennie accidentally breaks her neck. Her loneliness costs her her life.
    Crooks is a lonely character. He is ostracized by the the white ranch hands. He even has to sleep in separate quarters. He lives a lonely existence because he is black. He is not invited to spend time with the ranch hands. He is not invited to play games with the other ranch hands:
    Crooks, the despairing old Negro stable worker, lives alone in the harness room, ostracized from the ranch hands.
    Crooks becomes bitter because of his loneliness. He has no dreams of his own; therefore, he discourages George's and Lennie's dream:
 
 
 
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