Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pigling)
    You are not wrong that medicine is an enormous time commitment and will affect your lifestyle (relative to other people your age) for at least a number of years.

    That said, if it is a priority, medical specialties which have a more "balanced" lifestyle are definitely available. Psychiatry, for example, would be one of these. Speaking of which, if you are interested in psychology - there is plenty of this to be had in medicine. Psychiatry is a very rewarding specialty which perhaps you should look into, a medical degree is the only way to access a career as a Psychiatrist. Whilst at med school you will have to study everything else as well, but there is plenty of opportunity to explore psychiatry/psychological matters as well, in some depth, and these are certainly very relevant to almost all medical specialties.

    Definitely don't let "not enough psychology" put you off medicine. Psychology affects every single patient, and the doctor too.




    Medicine does offer access to a range of careers! Just they're all medical! But there is a huge range in medicine, truly, if you do go on to study medicine, you'll probably spend half your time (certainly as you near the end) wondering how on earth you'll decide between all of the career options.



    If you really think medicine isn't for you, of course you shouldn't take the offer, for your own sake! I think you need to investigate medicine as a career a little further though. It's not something you'd want to "let go of" if it turns out later that it's what you want to do. Pursuing medicine later on as a graduate is an option but remember that it can be financially difficult, and might mean juggling junior/training years alongside more adult priorities (family, mortgage) than others have to deal with.
    exactly, they're all medical... thanks for the helpful advice, i've looked at psychiatry before, but doing 5/6 years of medical training where i learn all about the entire human body, to finally reach the point where i can look at mental disorders and the brain in greater depth (which i'm sure i will enjoy) just does not appeal to me. i really like psychology in itself, rather than doing medicine and THEN going into psychiatry, i'd love to just step into psychology straight away, without the commitment that a medical degree requires. i agree, i'm trying to think long and hard in this month that i have left to make my final decision
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    hey,

    i'd recommend unless you are really sure dont go for it, but maybe defer it, gap year and think about it? Or do something else and try postgrad (its 4 years for some med schools). Dont commit yourself if you have doubts.
    I'd recommend a gap year unless you have another course you're crazy about.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    exactly, they're all medical... thanks for the helpful advice, i've looked at psychiatry before, but doing 5/6 years of medical training where i learn all about the entire human body, to finally reach the point where i can look at mental disorders and the brain in greater depth (which i'm sure i will enjoy) just does not appeal to me. i really like psychology in itself, rather than doing medicine and THEN going into psychiatry, i'd love to just step into psychology straight away, without the commitment that a medical degree requires. i agree, i'm trying to think long and hard in this month that i have left to make my final decision
    I don't think that's strictly true - there'll be elements of psychology all the way through those years, and Student Selected Components allow you to study subjects you're interested in. I know how you feel, in terms of having interests in other subjects besides medicine (I'm interested in psych + English too!), but the way I thought of things was that it's easier to maintain an interest in those alongside a medical degree/career, rather than maintain an interest in medicine alongside a different degree. If that made any sense.

    Why don't you ask your unis whether or not they'd allow you to defer your application, to give you another year to get more experience and make a decision?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KD35)
    To put it in a few sentences, you will get cold feet about any decision you make, that's normal, it's hard not to think about the other options you had and what would have happened if you took another path. You do have to make sure you picked your chosen career for reasons that will still matter to you. What do you want in life?
    This happened to me with another subject, I wanted to study it for years, I think the process of applying to university made me panic :rolleyes: and think about all the options I was ending. Ultimately, you just have to trust your judgement.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Here are the paths of my friends who studied medicine:

    1) Doctor
    2) Computer programmer(he is good at programming medical applications because he knows medicine stuff)
    3) Medical research
    4) University professor
    5) Pharmaceutical companies employee
    6) Business founder(something with herbal remedies)
    7) Herbs grower( medicine knowledge helps a lot)

    However, majority are doctors. Some are in biotech companies, some founded their own.

    And by the way, every single degree will require a lot of work my friend. Don't be put off by tons of work because life gets harder after any degree. Even hours spent medicine will not be on par with ability to live life after you graduate. It's totally different world. Think twice before declining the offer.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Valentas)
    Here are the paths of my friends who studied medicine:

    1) Doctor
    2) Computer programmer(he is good at programming medical applications because he knows medicine stuff)
    3) Medical research
    4) University professor
    5) Pharmaceutical companies employee
    6) Business founder(something with herbal remedies)
    7) Herbs grower( medicine knowledge helps a lot)

    However, majority are doctors. Some are in biotech companies, some founded their own.

    And by the way, every single degree will require a lot of work my friend. Don't be put off by tons of work because life gets harder after any degree. Even hours spent medicine will not be on par with ability to live life after you graduate. It's totally different world. Think twice before declining the offer.
    it's not the idea of hard work which puts me off, it's the idea of doing all that hard work to reach a place where i don't want to be. i enjoy working hard and i think my a levels reflect that, i don't want to stop working hard. but i agree there are many options with a medical degree, but those aren't necessarily the options that i want. i'm still thinking, i have a month or so to make a final decision. thank you for the advice
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think you should take it!

    You worked hard for this and the opportunity may not come round again whereas you could easily switch to Psychology or English if you really feel medical school is not for you, I think you should give it a go and see how you feel when you're in medical school, you don't want to do something rash and later wonder "what if..." :no:

    Also, have you heard about intercalated BSC's? It's possible for you have your cake and eat it too! :awesome:

    Have a read of that link; King's college, Leeds, Edinburgh, Manchester and UCL all offer and intercalated BSc in Psychology

    Best of luck whatever you decide to do!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Take the amazing opportunity think about it after summer and results and go through clearing if you change your mind
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Try studying for a year. If you don't like it, change to the course which you think is better for you. I studied medicine for a half-year but dropped out. it was not for me because I'm totally not people person. I re-applied for Computer Science this year and know that this is a lot better course for me because I practiced programming from the day I dropped out and completed some courses. I'd try medicine. You may stay there or drop out. It's worth a shot IMHO.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Valentas)
    Try studying for a year. If you don't like it, change to the course which you think is better for you. I studied medicine for a half-year but dropped out. it was not for me because I'm totally not people person. I re-applied for Computer Science this year and know that this is a lot better course for me because I practiced programming from the day I dropped out and completed some courses. I'd try medicine. You may stay there or drop out. It's worth a shot IMHO.
    just to clarify, if i were to take medicine, not like it, and then drop out after a couple of months (before January 2014 deadline), would i have to take a gap year to reapply to a different course, or would i be able to apply for 2014 entry? and would i not be at a disadvantage if universities saw that i'd dropped out of a medical degree?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    go for it, rectal examinations and death awaits you
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    just to clarify, if i were to take medicine, not like it, and then drop out after a couple of months (before January 2014 deadline), would i have to take a gap year to reapply to a different course, or would i be able to apply for 2014 entry? and would i not be at a disadvantage if universities saw that i'd dropped out of a medical degree?
    Well deadline is deadline you know. You still must complete your application by mid-January. I don't see how dropping out disadvantages anyone. It's a lot better to take a course, try it out and see whether you like it. If not, search for other options.

    I can tell about my friend. He took a gap year because he never knew what he wants to study. During this year he crossed out loads of subjects already and is planning to take another year off on order to find subject he loves. He said there are only sciences left. He did some volunteering and found out what he likes and not. I bet he will stay with programming because he said it is one of subjects he liked.

    Medicine is hard but so are other subjects. For example, programming is hard because you can try to solve problem and it would not budge for several days until some revelation which require a few lines of code

    To be honest, another aspect of taking a course you feel may not be for you is that you would take a loan which is not good By the way, why did you apply for medicine? You must like it and you surpassed a lot of applicants. Admissions people must have seen that you are suitable for this degree.

    @TableDust, all what you've enumerated is not that bad. It's sad to experience patient being dead but if you have done everything you could, you must relax.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Think back to why you originally wanted to do medicine; there were obviously some genuine reasons otherwise you wouldn't have been part of the small minority that get multiple offers for medicine! If I were you I'd take up the offer and try it for a year to see how you get on, after all, it will be much harder to get a medicine offer again than an English/psychology if you have a change of heart once more.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Valentas)
    Well deadline is deadline you know. You still must complete your application by mid-January. I don't see how dropping out disadvantages anyone. It's a lot better to take a course, try it out and see whether you like it. If not, search for other options.

    I can tell about my friend. He took a gap year because he never knew what he wants to study. During this year he crossed out loads of subjects already and is planning to take another year off on order to find subject he loves. He said there are only sciences left. He did some volunteering and found out what he likes and not. I bet he will stay with programming because he said it is one of subjects he liked.

    Medicine is hard but so are other subjects. For example, programming is hard because you can try to solve problem and it would not budge for several days until some revelation which require a few lines of code

    To be honest, another aspect of taking a course you feel may not be for you is that you would take a loan which is not good By the way, why did you apply for medicine? You must like it and you surpassed a lot of applicants. Admissions people must have seen that you are suitable for this degree.

    @TableDust, all what you've enumerated is not that bad. It's sad to experience patient being dead but if you have done everything you could, you must relax.
    i applied for medicine because i like helping people, my interviews were based on my work experience, i talked about a lot of things i saw, which i was passionate about. there are other ways to help people in life, which are just as rewarding, and if i enjoy them more, then they are even more rewarding. i hadn't considered all of my options when i applied. i hadn't even though realistically about the portion of my life i'll devote to training, or the huge scientific content of the degree. what i mostly thought about was helping people, and how i admired the doctors for what they were doing. i have so many other interests its truly difficult to narrow down, especially if my other interests are stronger than this
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    i applied for medicine because i like helping people, my interviews were based on my work experience, i talked about a lot of things i saw, which i was passionate about. there are other ways to help people in life, which are just as rewarding, and if i enjoy them more, then they are even more rewarding. i hadn't considered all of my options when i applied. i hadn't even though realistically about the portion of my life i'll devote to training, or the huge scientific content of the degree. what i mostly thought about was helping people, and how i admired the doctors for what they were doing. i have so many other interests its truly difficult to narrow down, especially if my other interests are stronger than this
    You seem quite sure that medicine isn't the right decision Don't go with your heart or your head, go with your gut
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    x
    Go with Imperial or you'll be telling your grandchildren (if you ever have any) about the biggest mistake of your life. You'd have to be dumb to reject them.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TooIntelligent)
    Go with Imperial or you'll be telling your grandchildren (if you ever have any) about the biggest mistake of your life. You'd have to be dumb to reject them.
    i think the biggest mistake of my life would be accepting the offer and confining myself to a career path which i don't feel right in
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I completely see where you're coming from, and am really pleased you've made this thread, because I feel the same, and have got a lot from reading all the responses I'm waiting on an interview result, and although I'd be over the moon achieving an offer, part of me would be equally/more excited not to, because there are so many other things I would love doing in life. A rejection means I could go and study English lit, or music, become a teacher and help young people, or somehow go and get involved in global development and help communities overseas etc. My life course would be so entirely different. Or I could just reapply for med next year...

    Medicine's such a weird one, you can see it from so many different perspectives. Everyone agrees it requires dedication and hard work, and is more of a lifestyle choice than just a job. But you can see it as a constantly stressful, draining, endless nightmare, with mountains of paperwork, deadly hours, textbooks and sitting at a desk forever. Or it can be seen as the privilege of directly helping people when they're at their most vulnerable, in a workplace that is constantly evolving with new technology, meeting and being inspired by new people every day. I have a couple of relatives who are doctors, but were really unsure whether to do it or not. Both said imagine yourself at the end of your life, asking yourself whether you made the most of the privileged life you've been born into.

    The decision is ultimately up to you, and if you're certain medicine isn't for you, don't do it. Yet at the same time, there wouldn't be much harm in at least trying the course for a couple of months - you earned that place. You might love it. Or if you don't, you could stop, reapply next year for English/ psychology and have a gap year learning about life outside of full-time education, travel, see what the world has to offer, find out what you really love without the pressure of teachers/ A levels.

    I'm really sorry about how long and waffley this is! It's late. Best of luck with whatever you decide to do
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    You really sound like you have made your decision and now are trying to justify to the world why you are turning down your medicine place.
    You don't need to apologise or feel bad for giving up a medicine place, you have decided its not for you at this point. Go and study English or psychology!
    There are no rules saying what you do at 17/18 years old is what you have to do forever. 3 careers later I'm happy I found that out!!
    Good luck!



    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    You're young do what you want, make sure you are happy doing it.
    If you want to study english, do it! and if you want to do medicine at a later stage you will make a better applicant and student having had that good old 'life experience' or maybe you will want to work in somehting else that helps people: development/aid work, teaching, law etc etc
    I got into medicine from a non science career/degree before applying as a graduate


    So to sum it up: Go study what you want/travel/try other things/make mistakes (Because once you turn 21+ people start to really think your an adult :/)/drink/experiment
    Don't let the pressure of other people dictate what you have to do
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Have you ever participated in a Secret Santa?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.