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    (Original post by Future-doc)
    It sounds weird, but I know from experience, parents always know best!
    The parents aren't the ones studying for 3-4 years.
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    So I have recently decided that I do not want to do the course I have offers for anymore (for many reasons) and I want to reapply for a new course in September, for 2014 entry. I have currently accepted an offer for Law with French at UCL for this September and my parents were really happy as they see law as a respected degree that I will have a good career from and earn lots of money.

    I have decided that I don't have a passion for law anymore and I am really interested in neuroscience. I've done a lot of research into the course and looked at different modules at different universities and I know it's what I want to do. However, I only have two months left of year 13 and I have taken A levels in French, History, Economics and English Lit, with AS levels in biology and maths. I might as well complete my my current A levels and as I need Biology and Chemistry for neuroscience, my sixth form have said that I can come back in September for a third year and finish my Biology and Maths A levels (doing A2 classes) and do Chemistry a level in one whole year.

    ANYWAY, aside from the fact that I can tell my parents are embarrassed that I will be staying on for an extra year at sixth form, they are openly condescending about Neuroscience as a degree. My dad says that it is a nothing degree that will lead me nowhere. He thinks that my best bet is to apply for medicine and become a neurosurgeon 'if that's the kind of thing I'm interested in' although I'm sure you can't apply for medicine if you've done 3 years at sixth form.

    I love the course in neuroscience and I want to do it because I'm passionate about it and I don't want do spend 3 years doing something that bores me. However even I am struggling to find common jobs from neuroscience that pay well and I have nothing to say when my parents question me in my choice of degree. Is it a nothing degree? What kind of jobs can I do from this degree? Any answers would be much appreciated!

    (Sorry for the long post)
    You sound like someone who keeps on changing their mind!
    Just do Law!
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    (Original post by Kailua)
    It's my understanding that most neuroscientists are researchers. At the end of your degree you'll probably want to do a masters and or PhD. Neuroscience is a good area to get into due to developments in neuroimaging etc, I personally hate it, (I study Psychology, I had a module on addiction and neuroscience) but each to their own. You could aso do a broader degree then specialise with a masters.

    There are some neuroscience summer schools, at the moment you wouldn't be eligible but after your extra year at college you may be able to get into one (probably the nottingham one).

    http://www.helsinkisummerschool.fi/h...e_neuroscience

    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ion/involved/summerschool/

    http://www.euca-excellence.eu/index....iscipline.html

    In reality if you hate Neuroscience in the end you could always do a conversion course and go back to Law right!? Maybe that thought will appease your parents. Oh and I would personally pick a course with a sandwich year, I am biased by the fact I did one, but they are very useful for developing research skills and networking with academics.
    thanks so much this is really helpful! Just out of curiosity- if I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, what route would I have to take?
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    (Original post by Rybee)
    There is NOTHING worse than doing a course for the wrong reasons. If your heart is not in Law, then kudos for you to admitting to it and looking at readjusting your plans. Yeah I do think Law may be better overall in career potential, but only because it's a respected degree that teaches a wide arrange of applicable skills in a variety of industries.

    But if you want to do neuroscience, absolutely go for it. You don't have to be a neurosurgeon, you don't have to be a neurologist, you don't have to be a doctor. You don't have to be anything that others want you to be. You may find that you have a real passion for research and choose to go down that route. There is SO much more you can do with a degree in Neuroscience than be a Neurologist...

    Hell even if you get to 3 years and graduate with a good grade, a lot of employers will be impressed by your skills. You could go on to do anything you wanted. Why your parents are 'ashamed' at neurology as a degree choice is beyond me. I think it's fantastic! Even if it doesn't work out, that doesn't mean you've messed up...

    'Shoot for the moon and even if you miss, you'll land among the stars'


    Also, have you looked into going to University and doing a foundation course, instead of doing A Levels? That might be more favourable in swinging your parent's views, and perhaps your own? Might just be a little bit more productive?
    Thank you! I'm sure that by doing a course I'm really passionate about I will get a better degree classification, whereas with law I'm not sure i would manage to do well if I hated the subject! I just want to know that I'm not closing all the doors! Thank you
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    (Original post by Derrick1509)

    If you enjoy a job and can't wait to get to the next day and do it again, it is no longer a job but merely a hobby for which you get paid --- My own quote( It's gonna be big :smug:)

    Sent from my HTC Desire
    Sorry to burst your bubble but Confucius already beat you "find a job you love and you never have to work a day in your life".

    To OP, I definitely say do some more research into law to make sure you definitely don't want to do it, I mean recall what made you want to do it in the first place
    You have an offer from a respectable university for a respectable course, so it definitely seems a shame to turn it down.
    Your parents want the best for you and obviously want you to get a job out of university, I'm not sure what the employability rates for each course are but thats something you might want to look into.
    Also doing another year of sixth form will be hard, and chemistry A level in one year? Dayum, doable but a lot of hard work.

    On the otherhand if you truely do want to do Neuroscience and is hardworking, then go for it. Just make you won't end up regretting it.
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    (Original post by Supportive mum)
    The last thing your parents ought to want you to do is commit yourself to a course that you know isn't right for you! I presume that you are predicted at least A*AA this summer, so if you did do 3 years in the 6th form it isn't because you've failed, so why would they be embarrassed? Far from it. It would show that you have given great consideration to your future.

    The 'taking 3 years over A levels' being a problem for medicine is only if you take 3 years over the same subjects! Taking extra subjects due to changing career plans shouldn't be. It may be worth making enquiries if you think that's what you might like to do. If you do decide on medicine, you would need to get work experience etc in between now and the October UCAS deadline. Forget the maths and do the full A level in Chemistry and A2 biology. You do not need maths.
    I think they just think that I'm wasting my time and are embarrassed that ill be doing an extra year because the associate that with people who couldn't get it right the first time round!

    Im predicted A*A*AA and I'm on target for those grades at the end of this year, and I'd be hoping for at least A*AA in Maths, Bio and Chem respectively, so I think I'd be in a good position with a level grades! That's interesting about medicine, is there anyway of being a neurosurgeon after a neuroscience degree? (Without doing undergrad medicine)
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    thanks so much this is really helpful! Just out of curiosity- if I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, what route would I have to take?
    You would need to study medicine first, then specialise. But that's my understanding from watching Junior Doctors on BBC3, ha so I'd look here instead

    http://www.sbns.org.uk/index.php/edu...-neurosurgeon/
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    thanks so much this is really helpful! Just out of curiosity- if I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, what route would I have to take?
    You'd have to attend medical school, and then specialise after graduation for the next 10 or so years.
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    I think they just think that I'm wasting my time and are embarrassed that ill be doing an extra year because the associate that with people who couldn't get it right the first time round!

    Im predicted A*A*AA and I'm on target for those grades at the end of this year, and I'd be hoping for at least A*AA in Maths, Bio and Chem respectively, so I think I'd be in a good position with a level grades! That's interesting about medicine, is there anyway of being a neurosurgeon after a neuroscience degree? (Without doing undergrad medicine)
    Pretty sure to perform surgery on people, you will have to do medicine!
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    I disagree with what most people are saying on here about Chemistry, I know it is a LOT of hard work, but in no means impossible, however make sure you know what exam board your college does, if its OCR B, I would ask you to think twice because the coursework is really really hectic and takes up about a month or two and since you'll be doing AS and A2 in a year, it will be hard and you will be juggling in terms of time management etc. That being said, most people end up retaking AS chemistry with their A2 anyway, and since you'll be studying AS and A2 together, it will be good because A2 helps with AS and vice versa. You'll be fine. If this is what you really want to do, then go for it! I'd suggest picking up a few chemistry books and biology books and just having a skim through them over summer before completely throwing your OFFER FROM UCL out the window. I hope it works out.
    Thank you! I wouldn't be doing the extra year if I didn't believe I was capable and I've already begun going through the textbooks and syllabus for the exams so I'm hoping it will be okay!
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Pretty sure to perform surgery on people, you will have to do medicine!
    I understand that, but if I were to do a neuroscience degree and then do graduate entry medicine (I know that's very competitive) would that take 20+ years?
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    It's your life, don't let anyone else tell you what to do because you will regret it!
    You've really only got one chance at uni so it's better to be sure of what you want to do.

    That being said, you should do some more research into how easy it would be to get a job after doing a neuroscience degree (I have no idea about it). You need to make sure that you don't want to take a slightly different degree like medicine or biochemistry and specialise in neuroscience later.
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    .....is there anyway of being a neurosurgeon after a neuroscience degree? (Without doing undergrad medicine)
    No there isn't. You could do a neuroscience degree and graduate medicine though.
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    I understand that, but if I were to do a neuroscience degree and then do graduate entry medicine (I know that's very competitive) would that take 20+ years?
    Even with that you'll only be doing 1 less year than undergrad medicine, so after your neuroscience degree, you'd apply to 4 more years of grad medicine, then you'll spend several years specialising but hey at the same time you will be making money! So I'd say 7 years at uni will be gone.
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Even with that you'll only be doing 1 less year than undergrad medicine, so after your neuroscience degree, you'd apply to 4 more years of grad medicine, then you'll spend several years specialising but hey at the same time you will be making money! So I'd say 7 years at uni will be gone.
    I think that's something I would definitely think about, my parents would probably be very happy if I said I was going to be a neurosurgeon but then my dad will just say that I might as well apply for medicine then

    I don't really want to be a lecturer or to spend my life studying and doing PHDs etc, I'm just so interested in the course and would be so excited to study it, I wish there were more clear career paths!
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    (Original post by Supportive mum)
    No there isn't. You could do a neuroscience degree and graduate medicine though.
    Thats definitely something I would consider doing.. But then it begs the question from my parents as to why not just apply for medicine straight away.

    I think applying for undergrad medicine would be really risky with my third year at sixth form and I don't currently have any work experience and would only have the summer to get some. I wouldn't want to do a third year at sixth form only to have no place at university, especially after declining UCL

    i just wish there were a more secure career path so that my parents would stop nagging!
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    (Original post by Molly9)
    I think that's something I would definitely think about, my parents would probably be very happy if I said I was going to be a neurosurgeon but then my dad will just say that I might as well apply for medicine then

    I don't really want to be a lecturer or to spend my life studying and doing PHDs etc, I'm just so interested in the course and would be so excited to study it, I wish there were more clear career paths!
    I would really suggest you ring up the universities you want to study at, and firstly ask them about medicine and if they'd have you on even though you'll be doing three years of A-levels. They're most likely to direct you to foundation courses for medicine, but that will again mean you'll have to take a gap year since you'll be applying for the 2014 entry! I don't think your parents will be very happy with you taking a gap year will they? But yeah, do call up and see where they stand with you doing three years at college despite getting A*'s but on the wrong subjects!
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    I don't think
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    I'm not much help on the subject side of things, but I'm currently in my third year of Sixth Form and I know exactly how you feel. My parents kind of reacted in the same way, but I didn't want to rush into applying for uni for a course I wasn't sure about, so this was definitely the right choice for me, and they came round to the idea eventually.

    Also this whole 'respectable degree' thing really irritates me sometimes. I get that the main point of university is to enhance your job opportunities at the end, but you also need to take into account that you will be studying this subject for 3/4 years. If Neuroscience is what you want to do, and what you have a passion for, then do it. I'm hopefully studying Communications and Media at the University of Leeds, and i'm fully aware that it isn't a really highly respected degree, but I'm doing it because I have a passion for the subject. You can always enhance your CV through extra curricular activities as well, these days employers want experience.

    Also in regards to this, 'He thinks that my best bet is to apply for medicine and become a neurosurgeon 'if that's the kind of thing I'm interested in' although I'm sure you can't apply for medicine if you've done 3 years at sixth form' it probably wouldn't effect you that badly, because it isn't as if you failed, it's because you had a change in what you wanted to do. It might be worth emailing some universities and querying whether they'd still consider you.

    I hope this helps to some degree (excuse the pun)
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    I think you should stick with law. It sounds like you've wanted to do it your whole life and that that's what you have worked for. You have an offer from a very respected university for a ver respected course that will probably give you the career and job security that you want.

    I know a lot of people who do law at university and NONE of them are passionate about it, most of them hate when they have to revise it and write essays but at the end of the day they will have a very good degree that can be applied to many different jobs.

    Listen to your parents!


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