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Should the government legalise brothels? watch

  • View Poll Results: Should the government introduce regulated brothels?
    Yes
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    No
    10
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    (Original post by Norton1)
    I believe that, fundamentally, the sex industry is objectifying of women and leads to their exploitation. I believe it is a negative thing which should not be encouraged.

    I don't need those beliefs to be validated or disagreed with, I state it only so it's clear where I'm coming from.

    On that basis, if someone is the manager of the brothel it is my view that they are exploiting their workers, which is something I believe is wrong. However, if the brothel is on a small scale and run by the workers themselves then they are being exploited more by the industry they choose to work in rather than one particular person.
    I believe that, fundamentally, the sex industry is objectifying of women and leads to their exploitation. I believe it is a negative thing which should not be encouraged.

    I don't need those beliefs to be validated or disagreed with, I state it only so it's clear where I'm coming from.
    While I understand where you're coming from, on the basis that we're having a discussion, then I'm going to disagree with you and point out (I'm sure you already know this) that you have little evidence to back up your point.

    The problem isn't the sex industry itself, but the WAY in which it is run.


    The only reason why the sex industry could be objectifying and negative is if you disagree with the act of having sex itself - and seeing as how you're here typing this today, then I highly doubt that you do.
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    (Original post by Norton1)
    Well, that is where we differ. I'd say an industry which makes women subject to men's desires is inherently exploitative, but you say it is a choice for the women to make. Those positions are irreconcilable.
    I think if a woman/man freely chooses to sell a service (sex) and it doesn't harm anyone else, no one should be able to stop it based on their own beliefs.

    Fair enough though, I understand your view.
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    I recognise the tax that could be brought in, but I went to Berlin recently where prostitution is a recognised profession and honestly it makes the city seem so scummy when you're walking around at night and there are prostitutes standing the length of each road which has a hotel...

    Anyway, prostitution is already legal. It's just the things that surround it that aren't (like soliciting, kerb crawling etc).
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    It empowers women? Lol what a load of tosh... Only a man would say that.
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    If both adults are consenting I don't see why not. In my eyes antone should be allowed to do anything provided it doesn't harm anyone else, this fits into that category nicely I feel. And the extra money gained from licence fees and tax wouldn't be a bad thing either.
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    A few people here seem to be forgetting that there are male prostitutes as well (admittedly a lot fewer). The crux of the idea would be for brothel owners to have government licenses to operate which would mark them out as being above board places for sex workers to operate (the license fees generating revenue which could potentially be used to address the problems which send some into prostitution in the first place).

    Bottom line is that the status quo in this country I feel does more harm than good. I accept that it's not perfect in the likes of Holland and Belgium but there's no reason why the UK can't take the initiative and make the system better.
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    (Original post by dgeorge)
    The only reason why the sex industry could be objectifying and negative is if you disagree with the act of having sex itself - and seeing as how you're here typing this today, then I highly doubt that you do.
    I think not, I would suggest that in the act of paying for sex one ceases to see the woman as much more than an outlet for one's own sexual desires. It is of a different character to sex which two people freely choose to have.

    (Original post by anonstudent1)
    I think if a woman/man freely chooses to sell a service (sex) and it doesn't harm anyone else, no one should be able to stop it based on their own beliefs.

    Fair enough though, I understand your view.
    It is harmful not only to the woman herself in the sense that it limits her sexual autonomy, but also to wider society which allows the exploitation of women.

    The fact is that, yes, there are women working in the sex industry who are clearly intelligent and articulate advocates for prostitution as almost a career choice but I can't separate that from the fact that it effectively creates a scenario where men's needs dominate those of women.

    But as I said in my first post, however much I might like to, prostitution is not something that can be effectively outlawed. Punitive approaches to reducing the incidence of it lead to more danger for the women involved and thus there needs to be a space where that's allowed. However, that space should not allow people not involved to make money from this exploitation.
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    (Original post by Norton1)
    I think not, I would suggest that in the act of paying for sex one ceases to see the woman as much more than an outlet for one's own sexual desires. It is of a different character to sex which two people freely choose to have.



    It is harmful not only to the woman herself in the sense that it limits her sexual autonomy, but also to wider society which allows the exploitation of women.

    The fact is that, yes, there are women working in the sex industry who are clearly intelligent and articulate advocates for prostitution as almost a career choice but I can't separate that from the fact that it effectively creates a scenario where men's needs dominate those of women.

    But as I said in my first post, however much I might like to, prostitution is not something that can be effectively outlawed. Punitive approaches to reducing the incidence of it lead to more danger for the women involved and thus there needs to be a space where that's allowed. However, that space should not allow people not involved to make money from this exploitation.
    I think not, I would suggest that in the act of paying for sex one ceases to see the woman as much more than an outlet for one's own sexual desires.
    1. I would question the extent to whether your suggestion is factually correct
    2. I would also argue that if it IS true, it is only because we villify and demonise the people (especially women) who engage in this act. Because we see them in a negative light it is MUCH easier to then only see them as an "outlet". If we legitimised the job, made people realise that people who engage in this aren't criminals or scum but normal, decent human beings who engage in a normal (albeit pleasurable) activity, then this dehumanising of people who take part in this activity would be reduced.
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    (Original post by Midlander)
    A few people here seem to be forgetting that there are male prostitutes as well (admittedly a lot fewer). The crux of the idea would be for brothel owners to have government licenses to operate which would mark them out as being above board places for sex workers to operate (the license fees generating revenue which could potentially be used to address the problems which send some into prostitution in the first place).

    Bottom line is that the status quo in this country I feel does more harm than good. I accept that it's not perfect in the likes of Holland and Belgium but there's no reason why the UK can't take the initiative and make the system better.
    I agree, a lot of people tend to overlook the fact that there ARE males who work in the sex industry.

    Actually, I'd argue that the system in Holland works quite well. It's just that prostitution opponents try to make an argument that legalising it won't stop the negative or illegal aspects. While this is true, legalising ANYTHING will never stop people from carrying out said legalised trade in an illegal manner (e.g. illegal production of perfectly legal drugs, smuggling perfectly legal products over the border to avoid taxes). Therefore the argument is invalid
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    There was a documentary on channel 4 a few years ago about some women from the WI who wanted to legalise brothels (sounds hilarious I know) in order to get girls off the street and allow them to work in a safe environment. Some of their investigations were very interesting and New Zealand looked like a good example to follow when it comes to prostitution laws
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    My ideological and rational reaction is yes, yes they should. However we should be careful not to see legalisation as the wonderful solution we've all been waiting for. Germany and the Netherlands have seen huge problems with people trafficking to use as commodities in this new legalised industry.
 
 
 
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