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Is it ALWAYS wrong to celebrate at the news of someone's passing? Watch

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    Yes, I think so. Even in the event that the death was directly related to some positive consequence, e.g., the fall of a dictatorial regime, then you should be celebrating the fall of the regime, not death. The celebrations over the death of Osama bin Laden for example were gratuitous and distasteful.
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    I don't think any death should be publicly celebrated as a glorious event, but I wouldn't tell people they couldn't express their joy over someone's passing, though I think making a song and dance about someone's death is pretty sad.
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    I must admit that I didn't really think I cared about Maggie passing, until I saw a post filled with hate and rage about her and the Torys on FB last night. It also wished death upon John Major.

    Now, I may not like these people much, but I found that disgusting.
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    I do not think it is right to cheer for someone's death, especially Margaret Thatchers.

    You might not agree with what she did with the country but you should still respect the fact that she was a strong minded woman, never swaying from what she believed in even when met with opposition and that is what I admire the first female prime minister of this country for.

    The fact that people are celebrating her death and can be so ungrateful of what she tried to do and the drive and passion she had within her is unjustified.


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    There are both legal and conventional limits to free speech. There have been and there always will be appropriate channels through which any criticism of Thatcher may be levelled in an acceptable manner.

    Convention demands that we do not make exhibitions of ourselves in the vicinity of funerals and this is what this is really all about.

    We are not too far from the day when if one were passed by a funeral cortege in the street, you were expected to stop and gentlemen remove headgear, even if the deceased were a total stranger. It is called respect for the feelings of others and such rituals bring solidarity to society, as do good manners.

    You can hardly condemn, as some of you have, fundamental Muslims showing disrespect to fallen British soldiers if you are going to behave in exactly the same way. It's double standards...
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    It's not always wrong, but most of the time it is.

    For instance, when Hitler died, that was a cause for a bit of celebration. Why? Because he was in power at that point, he was doing terrible things up to his death, and his death stopped them. Had he been captured and died 40 years later in prison, would that be a cuase for celebration? No, what's the point? What has his death achieved? He may have had the legacy, but at the end he would have been a frail, infirm old man with the power to do nothing.

    In my opinion, the only reason to ever 'celebrate' a death is if it has stopped something. And even then, you're not so much celebrating that the person is dead, but rather that they can cause no more harm.

    Had Maggie died in office, then I could have more understood this sort of thing, I still would have been disgusted, but it would have been more understandable. As it is, these people are celebrating the death of an old, frail, mentally infirm Mother and Grandmother who had been removed from politics by 30 years. I hope they feel good about it.
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    I wouldn't want to celebrate someone's death, specifically - no matter who they are or what they have done in the past. If they're someone like Hitler, and their death brings and end to a reign of terror, then rather than celebrate their death, I might celebrate the end of the trouble they have been causing (or perhaps not even that - just feel relieved by it).

    In the case of Thatcher, I agree with the OP, that the more appropriate time for celebration might have been at the time of her resignation. That was the end of her reign, and the end of any trouble she was causing for the public. The fact that she has passed away recently is, as far as most of us are concerned, inconsequential. Indeed, all these celebrations are equally inconsequential to her. They simply cause even more grief and show more disrespect to her friends and family, which they don't deserve.
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    (Original post by TheGuy117)
    You haven't answered the question "Is it ALWAYS wrong to celebrate at the news of someone's passing?" just for Thatcher....

    As someone above has said, if I had been alive when Hitler died. I probably would have been cheering. So, no, it is not always wrong.
    Well, you were alive when Saddam Hussein or Osama Bin Laden died. Did you (you personally) "cheer"?

    Just curious. I don't give a **** really either way.
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    (Original post by Danz123)
    I start this thread in light of the passing of Baroness Thatcher. Posting my respects on Facebook sparked a mini-debate on her legacy, which started off with why I was even paying my respects in the first place. Someone even likened her to Hitler, and asked whether I would think an R.I.P is in order with him. I shrugged it off by asking how one could even compare the two, however it did get me thinking. Is it always wrong to celebrate at someone's death? I stand by my view that, while I didn't agree with her policies and views, it is utterly childish to cheer at her death. She's still someone's mother, aunt, friend etc. She is still a human being no matter what she has done. If any rejoicing should have been done, the better time was over 20 years ago at her resignation.

    Does this mean we should accord the same moral reasoning to every human being? Would it be wrong to celebrate Hitler's death for example, because he is still human? Should we be happy at the demise of Kim Jong Un, and gleeful at the news of his puppeteers (if he isn't doing the real leading) being struck down by illness? If there are exceptions, where do we draw the line at the acceptability of celebration, or is such a thing too arbitrary? Perhaps it does depend on the circumstances, those who have lived through the hardship of a dictator will probably rejoice. However, some of you may think that it is never right to celebrate at someone's death, regardless of subjectivity.

    Discuss.
    I agree with you about Thatcher and have said the same thing myself.

    I don't think it's wrong if that individual is a dictator who is oppressing the people and partaking in gross human rights abuses. Hitler would be an example. However if it's just someone you didn't like, grow the **** up. It's childish, it's disrespectful and it's rude. I don't agree with everything Thatcher did, I support Labour, yet I admire her because she was a woman who rose through the barriers in her place, from a normal family, who stood for what she believed in. You don't have to agree with her in order to admire her, or at least be respectful for her family
 
 
 
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