Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does anyone really like Shakespeare? And if so, which is your favourite? Watch

    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Melthusa)
    Sorry Mr Napoleon. :rolleyes:

    You quite obviously know best right?
    That does tend to be the case, admittedly.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tuerin)
    Here's an interesting question: were you to see two mystery plays, one written by Shakespeare and one by Marlowe, hypothetically ones you'd never seen, read or heard of before, would you be able to tell the difference? If so, what sort of stylistic/structural differences would you potentially recognise?
    I remember Marlowe's poetry as being rather bookish, and much of Shakespeare's wasn't. And I think Shakespeare's use of language can be infinitely more complex than anything Marlowe wrote. The difficult thing would be if there was nothing of Shakespeare at his best in the play.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I used to hate him but that was just out of pre-conceived ignorance. Now I love Shakespeare. He is virtually unparalleled in what he writes, the complexity of his language and the depth of the themes he plays upon are incredible. My favourite is definitely Othello after studying it for A-Level last year. Shakespeare is daunting for everybody at first, mainly because of the language but it is brilliant when you manage to get past that. My mind was so opened to him by the time of my exam almost a year ago that it strikes me that though written so long ago, many traits of human emotion are still powerfully represented through his characters that his plays are so relevant today. Give it a chance mate.

    ^God I really sound like I'm bumming him there haha
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Felix1944)
    I remember Marlowe's poetry as being rather bookish, and much of Shakespeare's wasn't. And I think Shakespeare's use of language can be infinitely more complex than anything Marlowe wrote. The difficult thing would be if there was nothing of Shakespeare at his best in the play.
    Hmm Marlowe I do think can lay it on a bit thick sometimes but what he writes is quite powerful. Especially in the case of Dr. Faustus. Will never forget the last line 'Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.' such a good little blank verse ending.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Felix1944)
    I remember Marlowe's poetry as being rather bookish, and much of Shakespeare's wasn't. And I think Shakespeare's use of language can be infinitely more complex than anything Marlowe wrote. The difficult thing would be if there was nothing of Shakespeare at his best in the play.
    Doctor Faustus I found incredibly long-winded, and that was only the A-text; God knows what students of the B-text went through! I'm not scholared enough in them to make judgements about style but from what I've read I suspect your view on their uses of language is probably right. Interesting.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In Holland u had like 4 schools levels, one was for slightly retarded people, one was the lowest common standard, then u get on level higher, and then u get the highest level... This was for kids of 13 till like 18...

    Only the highest school level ( Called VWO ) in Holland teached Sheakspeare to kids,,,, Is this also in Uk, or does also a medium intelligent schools in the UK teach Sheakespear to kids?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by deathhead)
    Hmm Marlowe I do think can lay it on a bit thick sometimes but what he writes is quite powerful. Especially in the case of Dr. Faustus. Will never forget the last line 'Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.' such a good little blank verse ending.
    I agree; some of Marlowe is grand. 'Tamburlaine' II.7.12-29 is a good example. ('Nature that framed us of four elements' etc.) The thought lurking at the back of my mind was that I could never imagine him writing something like 'I know a bank where the wild thyme blows / Where oxslips and the nodding violet grows'.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Oddly, I encountered the Faust story as opera via Gounod before I came across it in Marlowe's version. It's just possible you might find the music more fun! I haven't Marlowe's play to hand, but I do remember a rather splendid ending - and then the quiet line (from the chorus?) 'Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight ...'
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I like his comedy's - Much ado and I liked As You Like It. I saw Richard III at the globe, which was also wesome!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edwinemanuelposse)
    In Holland u had like 4 schools levels, one was for slightly retarded people, one was the lowest common standard, then u get on level higher, and then u get the highest level... This was for kids of 13 till like 18...

    Only the highest school level ( Called VWO ) in Holland teached Sheakspeare to kids,,,, Is this also in Uk, or does also a medium intelligent schools in the UK teach Sheakespear to kids?
    Everyone gets taught it at some point in england schools.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sufferin succotash)
    Everyone gets taught it at some point in england schools.
    Ha oke cool, sheakspear is lot about love and betrail hey, so even intresting for a person who studies to be a car mechanic ( i think ) , but in Holland, sheakspeare seems only for the smartest kids....
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I had to study As You Like It and Macbeth at school. At first, it wasn't very enjoyable, especially As You Like It but I really love both the plays now and I wish I could see it at the Globe!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Super_Nerd(:)
    Haha 'Shakey', brilliant!

    I'm glad you agree, Iago is such a cheeky so-so accepting praise for being so 'honest' when really he's a complete malcontent! I really want to see Othello in the theatre...
    My best friend went to see it (she's an English Lit student) and she said it was AMAZING! It is certainly on my list
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Schichtoe)
    Och! Marry me.

    I truly adore Hamlet. Enjoy most anything, though, particularly live.
    You seem rather persistent on marriage!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Not a massive fan of Shakespeare, though my favourite is Hamlet. One of the reasons was it allowed me to baffle my biology teacher. There was a question in a mock paper I had no idea what the answer to it was, so instead I wrote 'Hamlet, Act 4, Scene 1, line 16' - 'Alas, how shall this bloody deed be answer'd?' (something like that) and she wrote a smiley on the script XD

    Yes I found Romeo and Juliet very dull. I loathe most poetry anyway so was also not a fan of his sonnets either.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I started really liking Shakespeare when I read Troilus & Cressida. It's very dark and witty at the same time, critics can't even agree if it's a tragedy or a comedy. Macbeth, A Winter's Tale and Richard III are my other favourites. Oh and Hamlet as well. Actually, I just like all of them
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I studied A Midsummer Night's Dream and Macbeth at secondary school and As You Like It for GCSE, and then Twelfth Night at A level, and absolutely loved them all! I just love Shakespeare's style and the stories themselves are brilliant (though I know he didn't come up with some of the stories himself, but they're still brilliantly told). I've also studied Dr. Faustus by Christopher Marlowe and for some reason, it just didn't excite me as much as Shakespeare's plays; I found the plot dragged and the style of writing rather monotonous and heavy. I'd have to say my favourite Shakespeare play so far is Twelfth Night, just because it's so fun and has amazing characters
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    i am loving Shakey's comedies too much... i have to stock up on rib cream before going to the theatre.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I hate studying Shakespeare at school but I really enjoy it now especially seeing them at the theatre,

    I saw Macbeth at the royal exchange a few years ago and it was probably the best play I have ever seen,
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Much Ado About Nothing and Taming of the Shrew - I absolutely love them!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.