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King's college london vs southampton watch

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  • View Poll Results: King's vs Southampton
    King's
    23
    53.49%
    Southampton
    20
    46.51%

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    (Original post by freeurmind)
    I did physics at kings
    Great! I don't know anyone who studied/is studying there so do you mind if I ask you some questions about physics and the university itself? Much appreciated!
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    (Original post by heyimbored)
    Not sure how true any of that is...There will likely be more theoretical options in later years, and maybe an extra one or two compulsory theoretical modules, but a theoretical physicist doesn't necessarily have a better grasp of a certain area of physics than an experimental physicist. They will have a better grasp of some area of theoretical physics, but a particle physicist will have a better grasp of particle physics, a nuclear physics a better grasp of nuclear physics etc...Likewise a theoretical physicist isn't necessarily smarter than any other physicist, they just have a more mathematical specialty, and they won't test you more. Being a theoretical physicist isn't some kind of holy grail for all physicists that only the smartest get to, it's just a different branch of physics like any other.

    Likewise on the teaching; good academic doesn't necessarily mean good teacher, I can only imagine it'll be the same kind of spread of excellent teachers and less excellent ones, as with any uni, at both Kings and Southampton.

    Between Kings and Southampton though, they're both good courses, and I imagine are a bit different. Kings has the overall better reputation probably, but Southampton's physics department is very strong and at least held on a comparable level to Kings, but all that depends on who you ask.
    Theoretical physicists spend all their time working on theory and first principles so they usually have a better grasp of Physics.

    Most experimentalists just spend loads of time doing experiments and less time looking into indepth theory.

    They both smart, but from my experience theoreticians usually have a better grasp of their subject.

    E.g. Theoretical particle Physicist vs experimental
    Theoretical quantum vs experimental
    and the list goes on

    Physics is applied maths so having a better understanding of the maths means you have a better understanding of the physics.
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    (Original post by topgun41)
    Great! I don't know anyone who studied/is studying there so do you mind if I ask you some questions about physics and the university itself? Much appreciated!
    Go for it
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    How important are RAE scores for undergraduate degrees?
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    (Original post by freeurmind)
    Theoretical physicists spend all their time working on theory and first principles so they usually have a better grasp of Physics.

    Most experimentalists just spend loads of time doing experiments and less time looking into indepth theory.

    They both smart, but from my experience theoreticians usually have a better grasp of their subject.

    E.g. Theoretical particle Physicist vs experimental
    Theoretical quantum vs experimental
    and the list goes on

    Physics is applied maths so having a better understanding of the maths means you have a better understanding of the physics.
    By that logic a mathematician would be the best physicist. Physics is just as much about physical interpretations of maths and how it can be physically probed as it is about the maths itself. Regular physicists work from first principles as far as the physics is concerned 99% of of the time, theoretical physicists have a deeper understanding of the mathematics behind it, and where it could be taken, whereas an ordinary physicist will have a deeper understanding of how it's interpreted physically, and how it could be used in a physical system.

    Any decent physicist knows plenty of theory to get on with, and to be honest, at the level undergraduate taught, most of it should be pretty easy work to any physicist.


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    (Original post by heyimbored)
    By that logic a mathematician would be the best physicist. Physics is just as much about physical interpretations of maths and how it can be physically probed as it is about the maths itself. Regular physicists work from first principles as far as the physics is concerned 99% of of the time, theoretical physicists have a deeper understanding of the mathematics behind it, and where it could be taken, whereas an ordinary physicist will have a deeper understanding of how it's interpreted physically, and how it could be used in a physical system.

    Any decent physicist knows plenty of theory to get on with, and to be honest, at the level undergraduate taught, most of it should be pretty easy work to any physicist.


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    You'd be suprised :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by ninuzu)
    I went for King's over Soton for my insurance after UCL. I like them both equally too - so a flip of a coin decided it.


    Edit: I am not by any means suggesting that you flip a coin to decide on where you study for 3/4 years!
    don't KCL and UCL both have identical offer requirements of AAB?

    so its not much of an insurance then, if you miss out on UCL, you'll miss out on KCL as well
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    don't KCL and UCL both have identical offer requirements of AAB?

    so its not much of an insurance then, if you miss out on UCL, you'll miss out on KCL as well
    Yeah - I was hoping one might be more lenient... Southampton is also AAB. I do have higher offers, but preferred UCL over those. Also, some people have been getting AAA offers from UCL, so that is what I was anticipating when I applied.
 
 
 
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