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    (Original post by Banana28)
    Yeah they check your skin type and everything so you'll be grand! Good luck
    Since I know that I should probably look into this too, would you be willing to give a little more insight into what the phototherapy treatment was actually like? I guess my biggest question is: did you get horrendously sunburnt/end up like Ross from Friends (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHtIymtC7uY)
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    (Original post by Perdiccas)
    Since I know that I should probably look into this too, would you be willing to give a little more insight into what the phototherapy treatment was actually like? I guess my biggest question is: did you get horrendously sunburnt/end up like Ross from Friends (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHtIymtC7uY)
    When you go for your first appointment at the hospital they check your skin type, I think this is to determine how long you stay in the light for. They increase it each time but they check the condition of your skin, it's all monitored really closely.
    On the first day of my treatment, I was only in the light for maybe 30 seconds? They increased the time I stayed in every time I went. I only experienced redness towards the end of my treatment when I was staying in for a longer time. They ask each time if I experienced any burning/redness/ tingling Etc and if I had, they would just put me in for the length of time I had on the previous treatment.
    I was never burnt really, I just got a bit red around my chest and my skin was dry. I guess it depends on the type of skin you have.
    Do look into it, you'll be glad you did


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    (Original post by Banana28)
    Yeah they check your skin type and everything so you'll be grand! Good luck


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    Ah right, sounds quite promising. Thanks.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    My scalp psoriasis sometimes itches, but the itch isn't as strong as eczema. I used to have eczema when I was younger and the itch was intolerable. I'd wake up with bloody fingernails, not realising that i'd scratched my skin raw.
    i normally always cut my nails so that if i do itch no damage is done and i always have a shower before bed and contantly change my bed sheets and clean my clothes because it prevents itching

    I also use an ice pack on my skin because it numbs the itching sensation
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    (Original post by diggy)
    i normally always cut my nails so that if i do itch no damage is done and i always have a shower before bed and contantly change my bed sheets and clean my clothes because it prevents itching

    I also use an ice pack on my skin because it numbs the itching sensation
    My eczema has gone now, but if i'd known that when I was younger I probably could have prevented a lot of damage. Oh well.
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    (Original post by Perdiccas)
    As you said in your first post, psoriasis is actually not as uncommon as you might think (Wikipedia says about 1.5%). Maybe most people feel uncomfortable (I notice, for example, that you are posting anonymously), or just don't know that the thread is here.

    I am not so sure that the psychological toll of the condition has been commensurate with the severity. I mean, it will get better or worse over time and I do not find that my mind shifts in one direction or the other. As long as its there, no matter how discreetly, it will bother me. It was hard growing up, because I lacked the maturity to deal with it, and I was at an impressionable age. Being older (well, 20), I get on a little better and try hard to be more positive.

    I feel for you because it's new and probably a little bit scary. It's not that well known as a condition, despite its apparent ubiquity. You don't know if it's going to get worse, whether you're stuck with it. Your mind probably dwells on it and overestimates its severity, particularly in other people's eyes. :hugs:

    I can't promise that everything will come up roses. The rational parts of my brain say that most people probably look because it's a bit unusual and that a career as a model or porn star (the option would have been nice, at least ) is out of the question -- apart from that, no one really cares (if they do, they're probably not worth your time). But then I think about modern society's fixation on aesthetic perfection, the unnecessary negative comments that have come my way (almost entirely from girls my age unfortunately - at least the ones that I heard); I wonder how it will impact my future. Yet, everyone has these concerns growing up, and everyone has something about themselves that they'd change, so I try to focus on the positives.

    What I shall say is that the condition spreads for some people, but not for others. I have known people who have small outbreaks on their hands every once in a while, but it is confined to that area. If you have a family history of the condition, that would probably provide a reliable yardstick. If not, who knows? Keep on top of your treatments, and you'll do ok.

    I was first diagnosed with psoriasis when I was about 6 or 7. Obviously I had it by that time, possibly even from when I was a baby (I know that I had cradle cap as a baby, which is a related condition - either a misdiagnosis or just lousy skin).

    It was definitely diagnosed from the appearance of the plaques on my legs, because they were already reasonably severe by that point. I presume that my scalp got worse later and went unnoticed at that time, since I can't recall it being mentioned. I also had trouble with my face at that time, but it later cleared up of its own volition.

    It just got more severe on my legs and scalp over the years, and didn't spread to my upper arms and shoulders until I was about 15/16. In the last few years, it has got much worse, spreading to my back, chest, lower arms, face. I also find that if I get cuts anywhere on my skin, they tend to heal poorly and often become sites for plaques, which is possibly why plaques emerged on my arms and back (I got a lot of small cuts from playing rugby). Funnily enough, the likely areas for a sufferer nails and outside of joints) have only appeared very recently for me. It's different for everyone.

    The mechanism, causes and general pathology of psoriasis remains poorly understood. There is no good reason to expect the condition to spread or get worse (some people find that it improves with age). One person's experience is not a worthwhile representation. I have found my skin to have good or bad periods almost idiopathically. It may remain constant for a long time, then get suddenly better or worse.

    I would tell you to keep up with the treatments that you have been prescribed at the moment. Whilst they may not 'cure' you, they'll certainly keep on top of things, and keep the condition manageable. Part of the reason my skin got so much worse after about 15/16 is that I completely lost my **** in frustration at poor results, and just completely gave up on it. I wouldn't see doctors, lost what remained of my self-confidence etc.. I'd just had enough by that point.

    That set me back a long way, and I would not advise it By the time that I got back on track (relatively recently), things had got worse. On the plus side, these more recent patches do at least respond much better to treatment, while the older stuff just won't really budge.

    As for the present day, I'm having a bit of a flare-up because of exam stress (I presume), but the summer weather is often very effective in clearing it up (assuming, of course, that I go outside). My doctor suggests phototherapy as a next step. I don't know why I don't go for it. I guess it's because I know that it will only work temporarily work and stave off the condition for perhaps a year or two before it comes back. Then again, talking about it as I have not done for a long time makes me think that it's probably the right choice now. Maybe I'll mention it to my GP when I next see him.

    I've probably written enough for today, so I'll leave it there. Also, anything you don't feel comfortable writing on the forum, you can always PM to me
    can you not get unis to lower entry requirements as it is a serious illness?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Wow, that must be annoying. I can't pinpoint the cause of my psoriasis, but i'm guessing my flare up is do to the stress i've been under over the past few years.

    I'll be moving away to university in the new academic year, which means i'll have to change my GP. One of my fears are that the university GP won't be very understanding or will be bogged down with too many patients to consider my treatment plan thoroughly. Having said that, my current GP is pretty useless as it is. :rolleyes:

    Is:

    i was thinking the same thing.so is there a doctor at every uni?do you have to renew some nhs medical thing...?
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    (Original post by huricane katrina)
    i was thinking the same thing.so is there a doctor at every uni?do you have to renew some nhs medical thing...?
    At my uni there will be. Well, i've been informed that there is one. I don't think I need to renew anything, not to my knowledge anyway.
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    (Original post by huricane katrina)
    can you not get unis to lower entry requirements as it is a serious illness?
    *chuckle* It's just my skin. The appearance becomes more pronounced when it flares up, but I have no real increase in physical discomfort, nor is there any reason to expect my exam performance to suffer. Some people get it quite badly on their hands which would make writing difficult, but I am fortunate in that regard. For me, psoriasis has always been a psychological problem rather than a physical one.
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    Hiya guys,

    I'm currently studying for my final A2 exams and have just been diagnosed with psoriasis on my scalp. I'm very self conscious about it even if it is just on my scalp but i'm pretty certain that it's due to stress over exams and losing friends. I was given loads of solutions and shampoos to use before including Nizoral and betanovate but finally I have been given Sebco which is fantastic. I've been using it everyday for a week so far and my psoriasis is so much better already. My hair is really long aswell which makes it impossible to get the flakes out How do you guys deal with being self conscious?
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    (Original post by HaylesAnn)
    Hiya guys,

    I'm currently studying for my final A2 exams and have just been diagnosed with psoriasis on my scalp. I'm very self conscious about it even if it is just on my scalp but i'm pretty certain that it's due to stress over exams and losing friends. I was given loads of solutions and shampoos to use before including Nizoral and betanovate but finally I have been given Sebco which is fantastic. I've been using it everyday for a week so far and my psoriasis is so much better already. My hair is really long aswell which makes it impossible to get the flakes out How do you guys deal with being self conscious?
    Hey I have this problem too. Around exam time, my scalp has become ridiculously dry, itchy and flaky. I put moisturisers like e45 and epaderm onto my scalp on days I wasn't planning on leaving the house and just let it sit thick on my hair. Then I get a comb and gently comb the lifted skin off. This seems to reduce flakiness for me. Also when you're washing your hair in the shower, really scrub and massage your scalp. Hope this helps


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