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    What a fantastic question, but also a fantastic course that you may be considering.

    Firstly, i'd like to say that your question is slightly controversial. This is because it may vary from each University, but of course there will be a mimimum amount required. As it is based off complex calculations it is recommended that you have a strong capability in maths to make the course easier to cope with.
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    Yes, maths is prerequisite and indicator that you can think logically and develop your ability to do this. This is why CS courses require excellent maths score as an indicator of aptitude. Problem solving is logical reasoning. If you cannot solve problems then you are useless unfortunately.
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    I'm at Birmingham and there's a fair amount.

    In first year you had a specifically pure maths module that was a mix of a A level math with further maths. Complex numbers, calculus and that sort of thing. With other modules generally just requiring a good basis in GCSE arithmetic and set theory.

    Second year the maths becomes more applied. Where you learn maths specifically for CS. Like how to solve problems in uniform ways that a computer could. Like Gaussian elimination where you solve an arbitrary amount simultaneous equations using a set algorithm along with a crap ton of vector math (matrices, intersecting planes with lines/other planes), advanced number set theory, probability and a whole bunch of theorems proving various things (e.g. Proving there are uncomputable numbers and cardinality of infinite sets .etc). The other modules become more dependant on math, requiring again a solid basis in set theory, it's notations along with languages and grammars (For models of computation and compiler theory) and lambda calculus for functional programming.

    The specifically maths based modules are pretty intense but the others just require a good basis of math to describe algorithms.
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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    I have maths dyslexia (discalcula) so for example 12 to me looks like 21. For these reasons I prefer programming as there's less numbers.




    Off-topic: So what course would you suggest just to learn Java or C?

    This is the course I'm doing: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/


    So everyone in this thread - bassed on this course (http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/) will there be a lot of maths, and to what level?





    So the core modules don't have anything above GCSE level maths?

    As for the optional modules I'll simply try to avoid anything which requires too much maths.

    There is nothing to worry about. Even the computer vision course at Kingston has no maths. This surprised me too.
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    (Original post by RichE)
    That can probably only be answered by someone at the uni. Is there an enquiry line/admissions person you can write to?

    As you've posted that you're quite taken with Kingston, then you might also consider what your options might be if CS does turn out to be too mathematical once there - is it easy enough to change to an IT or Software Engineering course for example that would be less mathematical?
    Depending on where you study, software engineering courses can be very mathematical. IT courses are unlikely to have much maths, or programming, or much else of any real use. This is the typle of course that could make you unemployable.
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    (Original post by tonyhawken)
    Depending on where you study, software engineering courses can be very mathematical. IT courses are unlikely to have much maths, or programming, or much else of any real use. This is the typle of course that could make you unemployable.
    Wait which course is employable


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    Thanks for all of the replies.

    Just so people are aware - I have programming experience, and can (to an extent) think logically, however my maths skills are very poor (I have dyscalcula so for example 12 to me looks like 21 which gives me all sorts of problems). At least I know Kingston doesn't have too much maths in it's modules, and the modules that have maths aren't too in-depth correct?

    While we're on the topic, does anyone know where I could study more programming and less of the other stuff which is highly maths related?
 
 
 
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