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If your born deaf, what language do you think in? Watch

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    (Original post by Sulphur)
    Dude...What happens to schizophrenic deaf people?
    That could be another trend my friend. Mind blown
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Interesting question. If you're severely learning disabled and schizophrenic you tend to have much more simple delusions (like the chair is moving by itself or something rather than the usual MI5/CIA are out to get me stuff), and hear bells/whistles rather than voices. I guess a deaf person will get normal delusions but what about voices? Tempted to say they'd be visual but visual hallucinations aren't a typical feature of classical schizophrenia...Maybe they just wouldn't get them? I dunno.
    Yes, it's quite puzzling. I was interested so I looked it up, here's an article surrounding the idea: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/0707/07070303
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    I think in Deafanese.

    Just joking. I think in pictures. I don't think in sound or words at all.

    I am deaf.

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    That's fascinating! I can't even imagine it..
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    Not everyone who is deaf is completely unable to hear.
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    i always wonder that, and also how do they learn to pronounce words in their heads? as in, my inner dialogue is in an english accent, i pronounce things the english way... i can change it to american if i force myself, just like my actual voice accent. obviously they will have neither, they have NO IDEA how to pronounce any letters. they must recognise and understand written words if they can read etc... but they can't hear, so they do not know that r is pronounced like an r, it is just a curved line... you learn how it is pronounced through people teaching you.


    do they even have an innter diaglogue like we do or do they think with images of words?
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    Such a strange question, yet so intriguing when you delve a bit deeper...

    How do you learn to read if you were born completely deaf and don't know what letters sound like? To me, it would be like trying to learn Japanese with no help... just figuring out what the different shapes/patterns (because that's all they'd be) mean? How on earth would you do that?
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Not everyone who is deaf is completely unable to hear.
    No, but I think it's safe to assume that the post was about those people who are completely unable to hear.

    Not everybody thinks in words at all though, even hearing people. More men than women think in pictures, and more autistic people than neurotypical people, but there are all kinds of ways to think that don't necessarily involve language.
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    (Original post by Finella)
    Assuming you had some other means of language acquisition (eg. reading), whichever language you acquire that way?

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    Surely you'd need hearing to be able to read? Otherwise how do you know what each letter sounds like to construct words etc
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    I think in Deafanese.

    Just joking. I think in pictures. I don't think in sound or words at all.

    I am deaf.

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    can you hear at all, have you ever heard? sorry if they are sensative questions. are words just something you recognise? when i read i say the words in my head, i know how to pronounce them. do you just recognise them as "images" with different meanings?
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    (Original post by itsmyname)
    Surely you'd need hearing to be able to read? Otherwise how do you know what each letter sounds like to construct words etc
    No, deaf people learn to read. And write. They just can't hear.

    The letters just mean something different. It's hard to understand because of the way we were taught to read as hearing kids, but it can definitely be done.
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    I always wondered how you taught deaf people to read and write, I mean, it must be so hard if you can't pronounce the word/remember what it sounds like.

    Good question OP
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    (Original post by Jingers)
    So they think in words and images?
    Yes, but I hear what I say rather than hear it.

    Great question OP
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    I think in Deafanese.

    Just joking. I think in pictures. I don't think in sound or words at all.

    I am deaf.

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    Do you think in terms of people signing?
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    I think in Deafanese.

    Just joking. I think in pictures. I don't think in sound or words at all.

    I am deaf.

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    i've read other posts by you where you talk about conversations you've had with people so you must have an understanding of spoken language?
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    I asked my aunt and she thinks in images. Which you can actually kind of tell cause when she texts me sometimes the words in the sentence are jumbled up, but you know what she's saying, which suggests in her head she's not thinking the words but the idea...

    I personally can't imagine it. Also, sound isn't even a concept to her because she's never experienced it, so she can't answer the question. But, she does know when we're being too loud or when something is too noisy due to people's body language around her.
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    (Original post by Albino)
    Surely a lot of the time vibrations wouldn't wake you up though?

    (Original post by OU Student)
    :lol:

    There are vibrating and flashing alarm clocks you can buy. And if you can hear some stuff, you can buy an alarm clock which you can change the volume on.



    You can buy ones which you clip on to your pyjamas.
    I'm not deaf but I wake up from my phone vibrating. It is placed on the edge and falls on my head though :
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    It is an interesting subject. Think of being deaf and blind at the same time. I am also curious as to how one goes about that. Surely a lot of communication must be through feeling?
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    As someone with deaf parents there are quite a lot of funny misconceptions on this thread.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    It is an interesting subject. Think of being deaf and blind at the same time. I am also curious as to how one goes about that. Surely a lot of communication must be through feeling?
    Have you read about Helen Keller? She was deaf and blind, and was taught almost entirely through touch. I imagine the many books and films about her would answer some of your questions.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    It is an interesting subject. Think of being deaf and blind at the same time. I am also curious as to how one goes about that. Surely a lot of communication must be through feeling?
    I've done some voluntary work with deafblind children with a charity called Sense. Dual sensory impairment definitely makes things complicated communication wise, but there's deafblind manual for formal communication, & yeah, lots of communicating through touch. You just have to be more creative
 
 
 
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