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    (Original post by la95)
    It depends on the university. Take a look at this page: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/UKCAT
    Thank you, very helpful


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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Do bear in mind, however, that not all Access courses are accepted by all medical schools, so you need to research it carefully.

    UKCAT score varies each year and by each uni, though there are some which don't use it at all and some that don't put much weighting on it. Check out the link in the post above this for more info.
    Some top universities like kings and Cambridge except it though! And the access courses cost like £1200 :O which I can't afford!


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Some top universities like kings and Cambridge except it though! And the access courses cost like £1200 :O which I can't afford!


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    I'm pretty sure they offer bursaries and grants if you meet a certain criteria
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    Chances are very slim. Poor GCSEs, no A-levels... Lets face it if you wanna do biochemistry at a respectable/average university you need A-levels. Getting a poor biochemistry degree from a poor university won't help you to get into post grad medicine. Post grad medicine is even more competitive than undergraduate medicine, so what makes you thing you'd stand a chance. Might sound offensive, but im being realistic.
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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Some top universities like kings and Cambridge except it though! And the access courses cost like £1200 :O which I can't afford!


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    dude if u want an honest opinion then its probably not gonna work out for u.
    never give up on ur dreams but there comes a point when u just have to face reality

    i dont even see how ur gonna get onto a biochem course let alone a postgrad med course

    what btec's do u take?
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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Some top universities like kings and Cambridge except it though! And the access courses cost like £1200 :O which I can't afford!


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    As opposed to the £36k you might need to do medicine as a graduate, if you were only to get into a 5 year course... Higher education isn't cheap. But you need to consider whether it's worth it to get to where you want to be.
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    (Original post by Nitrogen)
    Chances are very slim. Poor GCSEs, no A-levels... Lets face it if you wanna do biochemistry at a respectable/average university you need A-levels. Getting a poor biochemistry degree from a poor university won't help you to get into post grad medicine. Post grad medicine is even more competitive than undergraduate medicine, so what makes you thing you'd stand a chance. Might sound offensive, but im being realistic.
    Well to be honest i could still apply for the 5 year medicine after getting a degree.


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    (Original post by ThePremierLeague)
    dude if u want an honest opinion then its probably not gonna work out for u.
    never give up on ur dreams but there comes a point when u just have to face reality

    i dont even see how ur gonna get onto a biochem course let alone a postgrad med course

    what btec's do u take?
    BTEC LEVEL 3 extended diploma in applied science. (Medical science)


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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    As opposed to the £36k you might need to do medicine as a graduate, if you were only to get into a 5 year course... Higher education isn't cheap. But you need to consider whether it's worth it to get to where you want to be.
    So would be easier to go onto a 5 year medicine course?


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    So would be easier to go onto a 5 year medicine course?


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    You have a greater chance of getting into a 5yr as a grad than a 4yr, but you need £36,000 to hand because the funding arrangements are different - the 4yr doesn't need any money up front, AFAIK.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    You have a greater chance of getting into a 5yr as a grad than a 4yr, but you need £36,000 to hand because the funding arrangements are different - the 4yr doesn't need any money up front, AFAIK.
    Would I get any help with that due to the fact that my mum is a single parent on low income?!


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Would I get any help with that due to the fact that my mum is a single parent on low income?!


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    No. You get funding to pay the rest of the costs, but finding the first £36k is up to you, hence why I'm suggesting that in the long run paying £1200 to get into medicine as an undergraduate might actually be worth it.
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    Also, there's a thread here on Access courses that you might find interesting.
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    (Original post by Nitrogen)
    Chances are very slim. Poor GCSEs, no A-levels... Lets face it if you wanna do biochemistry at a respectable/average university you need A-levels. Getting a poor biochemistry degree from a poor university won't help you to get into post grad medicine. Post grad medicine is even more competitive than undergraduate medicine, so what makes you thing you'd stand a chance. Might sound offensive, but im being realistic.
    Where you get your first degree does not appear to matter one bit to Grad Entry Medicine admissions.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    No. You get funding to pay the rest of the costs, but finding the first £36k is up to you, hence why I'm suggesting that in the long run paying £1200 to get into medicine as an undergraduate might actually be worth it.
    I understand where your coming from now!


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    (Original post by Ronove)
    Where you get your first degree does not appear to matter one bit to Grad Entry Medicine admissions.
    Doesn't it?


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Doesn't it?


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    It doesn't appear to. AFAIK a member of TSR has an offer for Graduate Entry Medicine having obtained a non-science degree from an ex-polytechnic (not that ex-polys are bad, but they tend to lack the prestige of, for example, Russell Group universities).
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    (Original post by la95)
    It doesn't appear to. AFAIK a member of TSR has an offer for Graduate Entry Medicine having obtained a non-science degree from an ex-polytechnic (not that ex-polys are bad, but they tend to lack the prestige of, for example, Russell Group universities).
    Well it looks like I'm in luck, was he offered by a great university?!


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Well it looks like I'm in luck, was he offered by a great university?!


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    I'm not sure which medical school offered her a place, but all medical schools are required by the GMC to be of a certain standard so they are all 'great'.
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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Well it looks like I'm in luck, was he offered by a great university?!


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    After much searching I managed to find her profile and she received three offers from what I can tell. I'd say if you manage to get a 2:1 or above in a degree, get plenty of work experience (and reflect well on what you learned in your PS of course!), get a good UKCAT/GAMSAT score and apply to Graduate Entry Medicine courses, you have as good a chance as anyone else. If you want it, go for it. That's my advice at least.
 
 
 
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