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    mind blown...

    did not even notice...
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    The recent series of In The Flesh was a very good example. It was heavily implied that these guy's had a relationship above one of friendship, but they were normal characters, and homosexuality wasn't discussed or a theme of the programme. One of them could have been switched out for a female, and it would have worked just as well.

    And that's how things should be done. It's good to explore themes sometimes - there's a lot of storyline material surrounding homosexuality, and it's socially useful to explain to people the issues surrounding coming out, family acceptance, etc.

    However, if everything is like this, it makes it look like there's nothing to a gay person but their gayness. It's just a trait, like a character being a bit angry or having brown hair. There should be characters who just happen to be that way. I still remember seeing the artist doing a composite in Dexter, who was in a wheelchair. You barely noticed it, the characters were always sitting down. There was no emphasis, no discussion. Hell, it was barely above 'Extra' status. There was no reason for him to be disabled, but he was. Because some people are disabled, and there doesn't need to be any other reason.
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    Omar from The Wire is the correct answer. Omar :cool:
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    After thinking about it a little bit, American Horror Story had the lesbians in season 2 (Lana's character was kickass, complex and shed some light on lesbianism in the 60s). Murder house had the gay couple, I think the fact he was an interior designer might be regarded as a cliche to some, but again I think their characters were 'developed' enough to withstand his flamboyancy.

    I watched Last Tango in Halifax with my mum (it was actually well-written and cast okay!!) and the middle age mother falls for a black woman. I think what there really lacks is diversity in age and race and backgrounds. It's all quite 'acceptably' young/white/attractive, or in the case of programmes like glee and modern family, just used for comical purposes.

    You're right too that it seems like their sexuality IS consistently the plot as opposed to just being part of the character.
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    Dumbledore?

    I think the kinds of characters you're looking for are going to be quite rare. Generally, the creator of the story isn't going to make a character gay unless it is relevant to the storyline in some way. And because it's relevant to the storyline, the creator will have to make them behave in a way which reminds you that they're gay, in order for the storyline to make sense in your mind.

    They could make them gay even if it isn't particularly relevant to the storyline (e.g. Dumbledore). But what would be the motivation for the creator to do that, other than for the sake of political correctness? I mean, Dumbledore could have just as easily not been gay, without it making any difference to the story line. Most readers/viewers of Harry Potter probably didn't even realise that he was.
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    There have been a couple of characters who have 'come out' in 'Casualty' recently.
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    (Original post by Jelkin)
    Friends was pretty good for gay characters not being too stereotypical - Carol and Susan weren't, and neither was that guy Phoebe married so he could have a green card ... oh hang on a minute, didn't he turn out not to be gay after all? Hmmm.
    What about the guy in the library at NYU?
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    I know exactly who this is on a TV show its Max from Happy Endings. He is gay in the sense that the likes men but completely the opposite from the gay, camp stereotype.
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    Glee and The New Normal are two shows created by Ryan Murphy, a gay man that wants to explore so-called "gay problems" so people will discuss them, become used to them and it lessens the stigmatisation of homosexuality. He chose to tackle issues gay people face using gay characters, some happen to be camp and others do not. Not a huge surprise. However, he has also created other shows (such as American Horror Story) that do not prominently feature gay characters and their "gay problems" if it bothers you so much. Nobody forces you to watch shows you dislike.
    As sexuality informs your behaviour (e.g. who you form relationships with, what people you may friends with, etc) it makes sense that it will often be explored as a part of a person's personality rather that a physical trait, especially with characters that have big character arcs.
    Examples where characters have had non-sexuality based storylines, but are gay:
    1). Kurt from Glee (Dad's hospitalisation)
    2). Captain Jack Harness (pretty much most of the plot of Torchwood)
    3). Charlie, Episode 20 Supernatural
    The positive impact gay characters have had is something to be celebrated. To dislike them because they are camp is effeminophobic. And for Christ's sake they're not all camp anyways so what really is the issue?:confused:
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    (Original post by paddyman4)
    Willow and Tara from Buffy?

    I can't think of a male example though. I agree that gay characters tend to be defined by their sexuality. I think it's an extension of real-life perceptions. However open-minded people think they are, people often place a homosexual's sexuality as their most important descriptor. If a celebrity comes out as gay, it is newspaper worthy. To me, in an ideal world, saying 'I'm gay' should be no more groundbreaking than saying 'I've got size 9 feet'. Sexuality should be just one of many things which describe you - on par with your interests, the people important to you, your hobbies, your ambitions, etc.

    It doesn't help that some (note, 'some') gay people do make their sexuality define them. Analogous to any oppressed group, gay people had to 'be proud' of their sexuality in order to fight for equality - in the same way that ethnic minority groups are often far prouder of their heritage than majority groups. But the flipside to that is this problem of becoming defined by something that shouldn't define you.

    I've probably thought about this too much...
    I agree with you and what this thread is saying.

    The one thing that annoyed me with Buffy was how Willow was called gay. She clearly wasn't; she was bisexual. I'm not just saying this because she had a relationship with Oz, as I know gay people can have relationships with the opposite gender. However, she did have a sexual relationship with Oz and definitely seemed to enjoy that. There are other times when she's seen as finding males attractive e.g. when she thought Dracula was sexy or when she thought Giles was sexy playing the guitar. She acted like all the straight females and totally different to the males. (lol, I have watched Buffy too many times)

    You can't find males attractive and have an enjoyable sexual relationship with a guy, then suddenly call yourself gay because you've had a relationship with a woman and realised you're attracted to women also. That is called being bisexual.

    As a bisexual girl, this annoyed me a lot. I think people have quite poor perceptions of bisexuality though, more so than homosexuality. They see people as being one or the other, not in between, or it's temporary or a cry for attention. There is definitely much more prejudice for it than the other sexual orientations.

    The one exception to this would be with Revenge, as Nolan is bi and they portray it very well.
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    (Original post by Kazbian)
    I agree with you and what this thread is saying.

    The one thing that annoyed me with Buffy was how Willow was called gay. She clearly wasn't; she was bisexual. I'm not just saying this because she had a relationship with Oz, as I know gay people can have relationships with the opposite gender. However, she did have a sexual relationship with Oz and definitely seemed to enjoy that. There are other times when she's seen as finding males attractive e.g. when she thought Dracula was sexy or when she thought Giles was sexy playing the guitar. She acted like all the straight females and totally different to the males. (lol, I have watched Buffy too many times)

    You can't find males attractive and have an enjoyable sexual relationship with a guy, then suddenly call yourself gay because you've had a relationship with a woman and realised you're attracted to women also. That is called being bisexual.

    As a bisexual girl, this annoyed me a lot. I think people have quite poor perceptions of bisexuality though, more so than homosexuality. They see people as being one or the other, not in between, or it's temporary or a cry for attention. There is definitely much more prejudice for it than the other sexual orientations.

    The one exception to this would be with Revenge, as Nolan is bi and they portray it very well.
    I'm also bisexual and I completely agree with this. It was exactly the same with Santana in Glee, although I love her character. This has happened in so many shows with "lesbian" characters.
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    (Original post by The*****Of96)
    I'm also bisexual and I completely agree with this. It was exactly the same with Santana in Glee, although I love her character. This has happened in so many shows with "lesbian" characters.
    TBF, Santana seems to actually identify as a lesbian and the point is made that she was never actually attracted to men/enjoyed sex with them. This is obviously unlike Brittany, who's bisexual and has gone on to have relationships with men.
    Although there are (sadly) other examples of biphobia in Glee.
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    (Original post by Luxray)
    How good is revenge getting, I'm watching it online (alongside when it airs in America). I know its just a show but I always get impressed at how quickly they seem to forge plans together lol
    Revenge is such a guilty pleasure, it's highly melodramatic and convoluted but I love it! I am only watching it on UK TV and I'm behind on that anyway due to exams but I'm so excited about the catch-up ...
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    (Original post by Kazbian)
    The one exception to this would be with Revenge, as Nolan is bi and they portray it very well.
    He's also the most awesome character - correlation?
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    I was thinking this the other day and Maxie wass the only one I can think of!
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    (Original post by Little_missy01)
    David walliams having just watched bgt


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    David Walliams isn't gay? Isn't he married to a woman?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Passwords)
    I know exactly who this is on a TV show its Max from Happy Endings. He is gay in the sense that the likes men but completely the opposite from the gay, camp stereotype.
    Got there before me lol but yep Max was the first one to come to mind as definitely not your stereotypical gay guy !
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    (Original post by Katie1210)
    David Walliams isn't gay? Isn't he married to a woman?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yep,I'm sure he is married to a model. Tbh I was surprised when I found out he wasn't gay. He's very camp though.
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    (Original post by GoodDay)
    I often get angry at adverts for having the same heterosexual-housewife-cereal packet family every time but I realised the other day that TV shows are just as bad for it when it comes to gay characters.

    Whenever a character is gay that seems to be all their character is about - or being horrifically camp really. Take shows like Glee or The New Normal, gay guys always seem to be portrayed as these cliche camp stereotypes, its pretty detrimental contrary to what the sort of people that watch these shows think.

    Even when they're not stereotypical camp people the only point of these characters is to be gay and have their gay problems. The only example I could think of where a character was gay but that wasn't the defining part of his character and role in the story was Maxie from Skins season 1. can you think of any more?
    Remy Hadley (Thirteen) on House played by Olivia Wilde. Her character is bisexual but her main story arc is that she has Huntington's.
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    (Original post by Katie1210)
    David Walliams isn't gay? Isn't he married to a woman?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    He's married to the Rimmel model
    But he acts gay
 
 
 
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