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The pill - going against gp's advice? watch

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    (Original post by beccagood95)
    Have you ever tried Cerazette?
    It's a mini-pill and my periods are 1000000000000 times better since taking it. No cramps, light flow.
    And it was given to me because my Mum had breast cancer too, so she couldn't give me the normal pill.
    On the other hand, OP, Cerazette was the worst decision I have ever made in my life. It made me a complete wreck (I cried non-stop for days on end) and have me a migraine with aura every day for the 10 days I took it (when normally I get them once every two months or so). I became paranoid my partner didn't love me any more and made me incredibly depressed.

    The mini-pill isn't for everyone
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    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I don't have them at all, except occasionally a bit of spotting if I miss a pill (and even then I have to forget up until the time to take the next one, I can be 16 hours late and still not get any spotting, even though I don't have any pregnancy protection at that point). But if you put a sanitary towel and/or a tampon in your bag at all times then it's not too bad, and gives you enough time to either get home or get to a shop and get some. Suppose it'd be a pain if you were sat there not knowing if it was your period or not (depends how heavy).

    Are there no patterns at all? Have to tried charting it?
    Yeah, it is totally random. Like once I stopped taking it for a bit, because I hadn't had any periods for like 6 months so I like to stop taking it just to check y'know? That's the one downside of a pill that gives you no periods. If it's working, no periods and if it's not working... Well, definitely no periods.

    Anyway, that time that I stopped taking it, I bled for almost 2 solid weeks. I had like 2 days respite when I thought it had finished and then it started again just as heavy. Most of the time I get a bit here and there, and sometimes I get proper periods. It's all a bit random really. xD
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Confused here. My mum had breast cancer too, about 10 years ago (more like 5 when I got the pill). I told the lady at the clinic this when I first got the pill and she went away and checked something then said I could have the combined pill. My doctors have also given it me before. I just find it easier to go to the clinic.

    Whenever I have had to register though, I have lied about it and just said no to family members with cancer, because I am aware they may say no, and it is the only one that agrees with me (tried the POP).
    There are far more options than just pills. Injections, IUDs, implants, are all far more effective forms of contraception and generally have less side-affects.

    If you insist on staying with the pill though, remember you can minimise your risk by avoiding other risk factors like smoking, alcohol, obesity.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    People are influenced by scare stories. Plus the word 'coil' alone puts thousands of women off IUDs, even though Mirena doesn't even have any metal on it.

    I saw a couple being put into nullips - they didn't seem too uncomfortable. Plus remember that its once every 5 years.

    Its not 'permanent' - you can stop it whenever you want and be fully fertile (unlike the depot injection). It just doesn't require renewal, which is a good thing.
    Its definitely not the word putting them off! I've had one. It was very painful, probably the worst pain I've felt. I didn't say it was "permanent" I said it was "more permanent" as in, less simple just to stop when you don't want it anymore.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I feel I should point this out. I had one put in, I'm 18 and haven't given birth. I was really scared because of reviews saying things like "IT'S MORE PAINFUL THAN CHILDBIRTH!!!!!" and "I NEARLY PASSED OUT". In all honesty, I hardly felt anything. A couple of mild twinges, like a really really really mild menstrual cramp. I'd give it a 2/10, a blood test hurts more than that. Having your blood pressure taken hurts a hell of a lot more than coil insertion!

    I think the pain is usually if you have something like a titled uterus or a cervix that is refusing to open. In most cases, it's not that bad. If it was, people wouldn't have it
    I've had one. It was very painful, probably the worst pain I've felt. Although I would say I've never heard anyone say it was worse than childbirth.
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    Hey OP. I was on Microgynon for a year and that forced me to have periods even though I was anorexic. They were heavy and crippling. My doc switched me to Cerazette and one of the side-effects is never having periods/irregular, light bleeding. In 4 years I have only bled once and that was literally too tiny to even notice. I would say most GPs will put you on Cerazette if you ask because you have a history of a medical condition or a medical condition. I was switched because I couldn't afford to lose any blood. My best friend has recently switched to Cerazette and, whereas she used to be unable to move due to cramps, we can even go dancing when she's on her period! x
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    (Original post by bananaa)
    I've had one. It was very painful, probably the worst pain I've felt. Although I would say I've never heard anyone say it was worse than childbirth.
    Seriously? I really didn't find it painful, waxing hurts far more. A 'normal' period for me hurts waaaaaaaaay more. Maybe I just have a high pain tolerance :/
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    (Original post by bananaa)
    Its definitely not the word putting them off!
    It does. Studies have been done. Calling it an 'intrauterine device' rather than a coil doubles uptake, even when the exact same explanation is given.

    Patients also report substantially less pain, and get greater satisfaction from it.
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    A combination of taxanemic acid and mefanic acid helps if you can't go on the pill. I used to have really had cramps from mefanic acid too after it working perfectly fine for the first two times. My GP told me to lessen my does (used to take 6 a day) but eventually presecribed taxanemic acid. before this I used to have 1 tablet of mefanic acid and 1 ibuprofen 3 times a day. This worked too.

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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Doesn't mean it wouldn't work for you though, and a pill is far less effective, is far more effort and has far more side-effects.

    Each individual needs to decide what's right for them - sometimes there are cases where people try the coil and it isn't the best. However, if you need a new form of contraception and need to decide between them... IUDs are just hands down the best.
    I'm not sure you can say that different things work for different people and every individual needs to decide what's right for them and then say that IUDs are just hands down the best without contradicting yourself.
    I do agree that everyone needs to make their own decision, so I'm just letting people know my experiences - first hand and my mothers - so that they don't just get a one sided account. I've said how the POP is amazing for me, someone else has said it didn't work for them. You've said the coil is great for you, I've said it didn't work for my mum at first (although she loves it now it's settled down she went back to see the practice nurse three times in the six months to see if what she had was normal and if she needed it removed or not).
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    (Original post by Beckyweck)
    Yeah, it is totally random. Like once I stopped taking it for a bit, because I hadn't had any periods for like 6 months so I like to stop taking it just to check y'know? That's the one downside of a pill that gives you no periods. If it's working, no periods and if it's not working... Well, definitely no periods.

    Anyway, that time that I stopped taking it, I bled for almost 2 solid weeks. I had like 2 days respite when I thought it had finished and then it started again just as heavy. Most of the time I get a bit here and there, and sometimes I get proper periods. It's all a bit random really. xD
    That is so unusual, you'd expect some kind of pattern. Anyway, you can just carry sanitary protection with you at all times and you'll be fine (if a bit miffed).

    I haven't had any periods for coming up to 2 years now, but I've also not been sexually active in that period so I'm not worried about having the same effect when it's not working. I know some doctors (my auntie is a GP) recommend pregnancy tests every 3 months or so to make sure, so that's probably what I'll do.
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    The implant is also an option.
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    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I'm not sure you can say that different things work for different people and every individual needs to decide what's right for them and then say that IUDs are just hands down the best without contradicting yourself.
    What i mean is, before you've tried anything and don't know what will work for you, the IUD is easily the best. Most in the medical profession would agree with me. There are also measures like the failure rate being lower than all other methods bar the implant (0.2% per year, vs 9% per year for the POP, say (typical use)).

    If you've tried the POP already and found it amazing and never forget and don't mind having to go through all the faff of taking a regular pill, then you can make a case that its best for you individually. Before you knew that though, an IUD would have been the better choice for most women.

    I'm plugging this because a lot of women have misconcenptions and irrational fears of "the coil" (:nooo:), when its side-affect free (except sometimes irregular bleeding at first, rarely lasting longer), super-reliable, only needs reviewing every 5 years so super-convenient, and statistically the best at reducing periods. Most women don't find it very bad to be put in, and those that have had children often don't even notice any sensation at all. Its overlooked way too often.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    What i mean is, before you've tried anything and don't know what will work for you, the IUD is easily the best. Most in the medical profession would agree with me. There are also measures like the failure rate being lower than all other methods bar the implant (0.2% per year, vs 9% per year for the POP, say (typical use)).

    If you've tried the POP already and found it amazing and never forget and don't mind having to go through all the faff of taking a regular pill, then you can make a case that its best for you individually. Before you knew that though, an IUD would have been the better choice for most women.

    I'm plugging this because a lot of women have misconcenptions and irrational fears of "the coil" (:nooo:), when its side-affect free (except sometimes irregular bleeding at first, rarely lasting longer), super-reliable, only needs reviewing every 5 years so super-convenient, and statistically the best at treating reducing periods. Most women don't find it very bad to be put in, and those that have had children often don't even notice any sensation at all. Its overlooked way too often.
    #

    This. I wasn't ever told about it in any contraception classes and only found out about it properly when I had to look into other options because the pill gave me migraines. Best thing ever, has really improved my life (sounds rather silly but I'm no longer in agonising pain), wish I'd known about it before.
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    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    That is so unusual, you'd expect some kind of pattern. Anyway, you can just carry sanitary protection with you at all times and you'll be fine (if a bit miffed).

    I haven't had any periods for coming up to 2 years now, but I've also not been sexually active in that period so I'm not worried about having the same effect when it's not working. I know some doctors (my auntie is a GP) recommend pregnancy tests every 3 months or so to make sure, so that's probably what I'll do.
    Yeah I do, it's not like just one takes up a ton of room. :P I'm not overly bothered if I do get pregnant to be honest, I'm with one man and certainly aim to stay with that one man. I won't say I'll always be with him because I'll get a load of people picking it apart. xD

    I just want to finish my studies before I do have babies because it's more convenient!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    It does. Studies have been done. Calling it an 'intrauterine device' rather than a coil doubles uptake, even when the exact same explanation is given.

    Patients also report substantially less pain, and get greater satisfaction from it.
    lol whatever
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    I had the same problem as you with period cramps. They literally ruin your entire life, especially in my case where they started a week before the period and lasted for the whole period (which lasted another week). Not to mention the loss of blood and loss of appetite due to the pain = loss of weight = being very underweight and weak and anemic constantly. In short, a nightmare.

    The pill was a TREMENDOUS help. If your periods are so bad then I think you should ask your GP for a genetics test to see if the breast cancer in your mother was hereditary or a chance one. I was prescribed mefenamic acid too and it doesn't help at all. The pill literally saved my life. It's a shame if you couldn't experience the joy of finally living freely.
 
 
 
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