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    (Original post by aoxa)
    In the Scotland independence vote, 16 year olds will be allowed to vote.

    If 16 year olds are mature enough in the Scotland vote, does this mean that the voting age for general elections should be lowered to 16 instead of 18?

    I was just wondering about other people's point of view on this topic
    They aren't mature enough. The SNP knows its unlikely to win the independence vote and so has lowered the age as those under 18 are more likely to be in favour.

    SHould be kept at 18 whilst a few 16 year olds are mature enough most aren't.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    1) Fair enough, that's consistent

    2) You'd be surprised. What about a disabled 16 year old who passionately wants to keep DLA? Or a 16 year old who cares for a sick mother who supports the welfare state? Or a budding entrepreneur who's just starting a company and wants to protect small business?

    4) In order to do that we'd have to have a shift in how people think about things, which won't be achieved by limiting who can vote

    I understand what you're saying, and I stand by what I said in that lowering the voting age won't help them. Because of the other points I made I feel that the small minority of informed voters would be diluted by the overwhelming majority of uninformed ones.

    I used to think that everyone should be allowed to vote. Coming to Uni, and asking people what they think on politics, the majority of girls I hang out with told me they only voted for the best looking candidate (Which is apparently Nick Clegg). Guys tell me that they voted for David Cameron because they're 'gonna be rich like'. I've changed my opinion on this massively, and now believe there should be a basic competency test that requires you to identify what each party stands for before being allowed to vote. Voting is a privilege and it should start being treated like one.

    I think ideas like that are much more worth discussion than lowering the voting age. I believe that people with informed opinions should be voting, and whilst letting 16 year olds vote might help some anomalies who know why they're voting get a say, in reality it would just be a massive influx of confused and ignorant votes.
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    No!
    If 16 year olds everywhere are like the ones in my school, this country will be in more ****s.
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    (Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
    I understand what you're saying, and I stand by what I said in that lowering the voting age won't help them. Because of the other points I made I feel that the small minority of informed voters would be diluted by the overwhelming majority of uninformed ones.

    I used to think that everyone should be allowed to vote. Coming to Uni, and asking people what they think on politics, the majority of girls I hang out with told me they only voted for the best looking candidate (Which is apparently Nick Clegg). Guys tell me that they voted for David Cameron because they're 'gonna be rich like'. I've changed my opinion on this massively, and now believe there should be a basic competency test that requires you to identify what each party stands for before being allowed to vote. Voting is a privilege and it should start being treated like one.

    I think ideas like that are much more worth discussion than lowering the voting age. I believe that people with informed opinions should be voting, and whilst letting 16 year olds vote might help some anomalies who know why they're voting get a say, in reality it would just be a massive influx of confused and ignorant votes.
    I usually find the uninformed don't vote, not always but a lot of time the idiots stay away.

    But these are adult women. Not 16 year olds. Adults are just as likely to be stupid about it as 16 year olds. That's so retarded and saddens me (and sets the women's movement back), plus Ed Milliband is blatantly where it's at :awesome: In some way I agree, but then it doesn't sit comfortably with me as I fundamentally believe in a democratic state. It's not easy to find a solution to it.
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    I think it should. There are just as many sixteen year olds who are politically tuned in as eighteen year olds that aren't. Education policies effect them, let them have their say.
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    (Original post by aoxa)
    In the Scotland independence vote, 16 year olds will be allowed to vote.

    If 16 year olds are mature enough in the Scotland vote, does this mean that the voting age for general elections should be lowered to 16 instead of 18?

    I was just wondering about other people's point of view on this topic
    But the question is, are they really? I don't think I'm the only person in thinking that allowing 16 year olds to vote is as much a ploy from the SNP as much as it as about allowing people who should vote, vote.

    I barely trust the people I know at 18 to vote. I certainly don't trust those younger to vote. And I'm 17.
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    By many people's reasoning, why stop at 16? Why not 14, or 12? After all, some 14 year olds are inevitably more mature than some 16 year olds. There is obviously a problem with an arbitrary cut off point but that is also the case with other things (e.g alcohol), the fact of the matter is it is the best solution. There has to be a cut off somewhere, so it makes sense that the cut off point be the point of adulthood.
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    (Original post by charliemac41)
    By your reasoning, why stop at 16? Why not 14, or 12? After all, some 14 year olds are inevitably more mature than some 16 year olds. There is obviously a problem with an arbitrary cut off point but that is also the case with other things (e.g alcohol), the fact of the matter is it is the best solution. There has to be a cut off somewhere, so it makes sense that the cut off point be the point of adulthood.
    Because at 16, you can leave school (although this will soon change), you can get a job, you can have sex legally, you can fight for your country, you have to pay adult prices for everything, you can get married and you generally start doing what you wish instead of just going with it and developing as a person.

    Yet you can't vote
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    My sister is 16 she's the only 16 year old I know so I'll have to use her as an example. But if she represents what an average 16 year old is we're doomed. I doubt she knows who the prime minister is never mind what party he is in. I'll ask her and report my finding
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    No, they are too young. They might be well informed, but they don't have the real life experience. And a among the few mature, there is a much larger amount of idiots.
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    This will never happen; but I think basing it on age is perhaps wrong. There are 15 year olds who know an awful lot more about economics and politics than some 40 year olds- yet the 40 year old can vote and change governments. So perhaps introduce a test on basic politics and everyday economics that potential voters have to pass to get their vote.

    However, there are on the other hand 1000s of flaws in this. The 40 year old with little understanding of politics is being taxed, having benefits changed, using the NHS etc so why shouldn't they have a say? Basically there isn't a right answer, so it probably won't change.
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    it doesnt really matter. The elected ones almost always work for themselfes and not for their voters.
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    I don't think so. Perhaps if people were taught about politics and about the different stances etc before 16, then that would be fine, i think. However, I don't think most are informed enough and I think that they may be heavily influenced by people, when it comes to voting e.g. parents??? But then again, I can see where people are coming from with the whole at 16 you can a lot of things, and quite often people consider you adult enough to get a job, pay adult prices etc? So mmmhhh..
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    I think the risk with lowering the age to 16 is that not everyone has fully-formed political views or even any idea about politics and this could spoil the election for everyone else who does. There is a high chance that 16-year-old's will just mess about or vote for the same party as friends, etc. This spoils the election results for everyone who voted with fully-formed views and ideas.
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    No.

    Kids are stupid.
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    I think it should be kept as it is. If 16 year olds could vote then they would probably be more likely to vote for people that will benefit them in the short term and not consider the state of the country in the long term. I think the vote would be wasted on 16/17 year olds because they would not have an understanding of the real world. Most 16 and 17 year olds have been brought up without needing to worry about political views as it doesn't affect them in their sheltered homes. People died to give everybody the vote, should we just give it to people who have no clue on how life works?
    i think people should also have more faith in the government and the ability to vote as we are very lucky to be able to choose the government we want. At the end of the day they were voted for by the public and should therefore have the public's support.
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    I love how people think that on your 18th birthday, by some act of wonder you're miraculously cured of any idiocy you may have possessed.
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    As a 16 year old, I really don't think 16 year olds should be allowed to vote. The majority of other 16 year olds that I know, hardly know anything about what's involved in voting or what they'd be voting for, so I doubt that many people would vote at all.


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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Yep. There aren't really any arguments in favour of keeping it at 18. The one that always comes up is 'they're not mature enough' but there's just as many idiots at 18 as there is at 16, so might as well let those who want to have a say. Especially as you get charged 'adult' prices everywhere. If I'm an adult, treat me like one ktnx.
    There's idiots a lot older.

    However lets look at some of the things youcan't do at 16.
    Drink
    Drive
    Smoke
    Do Jury Service
    Go to War
    As well as a hole host of other issues.

    If the voting age gets dropped to 16, then so should the others.

    The argument about dropping the age to 16 normally gets supported by political parties who try to gain advantage in it by maipulating younger voters.

    So personally, I'd like to see it raised to 18 and ensure that everybody is in full time education untiol 18 as well.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I love how people think that on your 18th birthday, by some act of wonder you're miraculously cured of any idiocy you may have possessed.
    Well after two years (plus) of paying adult fees and being able to do more, 18 year olds may (hopefully) begin to realise that things actually do cost money and therefore begin to realise how the economy works and why various things happen
 
 
 
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