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    Awk that's lovely that yous can remind each other and that yous learn from each other. Both of you keep strong.


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    [QUOTE=Jacob ;42234415]Don't judge them for that. They probably don't want to partake in your religious activities for reasons you won't understand. As long as none of you are arrogant and judge each other you can still be friends.

    I guess that's understandable and no none of us are arrogant we try our best to understand each other and do our best




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    [QUOTE=racheyy1997;42234442]
    (Original post by Jacob :))
    Don't judge them for that. They probably don't want to partake in your religious activities for reasons you won't understand. As long as none of you are arrogant and judge each other you can still be friends.

    I guess that's understandable and no none of us are arrogant we try our best to understand each other and do our best




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    Then you should still be able to be friends. You'll find it easier with friends who are Christians but only because you have more in commen. Like I generally have more in common with male, medical students who like hitting stuff so am more able to make friends with them. It's just a slightly bigger issue.
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    Inviting your friends to Christian things is no different to me inviting my friends to come to debates. They inevitably don't come and I expect this and am not bothered but there's nothing wrong with giving them the option of coming. If they refuse and are offended by the invitation, obviously it wouldn't be a good idea to invite them again. But don't just accept this thread's consensus that it's a heinous action for you to even invite them; it's not.

    If your friends are non-Christians and militantly, aggressively atheist and contemptful of religion then praying with them will be out of the question, though you can pray for them alone.
    If, however, your friends are non-Christian and leaning towards agnosticism or if they're just pretty accepting there's nothing wrong with you asking if they'd like to pray with you.

    Your beliefs aren't a shameful, offensive thing to be kept under lock and key lest someone else doesn't share them. Similarly, extend the tolerance, understanding and acceptance you would like to receive to your friends' beliefs.
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    (Original post by jamesetta)
    Inviting your friends to Christian things is no different to me inviting my friends to come to debates. They inevitably don't come and I expect this and am not bothered but there's nothing wrong with giving them the option of coming. If they refuse and are offended by the invitation, obviously it wouldn't be a good idea to invite them again. But don't just accept this thread's consensus that it's a heinous action for you to even invite them; it's not.

    If your friends are non-Christians and militantly, aggressively atheist and contemptful of religion then praying with them will be out of the question, though you can pray for them alone.
    If, however, your friends are non-Christian and leaning towards agnosticism or if they're just pretty accepting there's nothing wrong with you asking if they'd like to pray with you.

    Your beliefs aren't a shameful, offensive thing to be kept under lock and key lest someone else doesn't share them. Similarly, extend the tolerance, understanding and acceptance you would like to receive to your friends' beliefs.
    The fact that she's said that she wants to be a good influence on them clearly implies that she wants them to change their ways. It's not acceptable for anyone to partake in a course of action to encourage others to convert, which is what inviting them to pro-Christian events does.

    Also, why the Hell would a Christian ask an atheist to pray with them, when a non-believer thinks prayer is useless? That makes absolutely no sense.
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    I know I'm new here, but I'll be bold. If I may butt-in,

    (Original post by Popppppy)
    Why do you need to get your non-Christian friends involved in Christian activities?

    It's people like you that make the rest of us Christians look bad.

    Can't you just accept them for who they are without trying to convert them?
    The job description of being a Christian - and any religious follower, for that matter, but since the topic is about Christians I'll focus on that - is to help people realise there is an afterlife and make certain they don't go to hell. Christians should be able to accept people for who they are, but ignoring the fact they are going to hell is downright ignorant and careless, and goes against being a Christian, if I may be so bold. How does helping people see life in a different light and in a different way make "the rest of us look bad", when that's what you're supposed to do?!

    As a Christian it annoys me so much when my fellow Christians are hounding me, trying to get me to go to the Christian Union, so I can only imagine how annoying it must be for a non-Christian.
    I wouldn't call myself a "Christian" in the conventional sense, but I do believe in God. My personal understandings might be rather controversial; rogue; scandalous; or unorthodox, however. But I do agree with you when you say so-called fellows basically force you into doing something, and there seems to be little you can do to oppose. If you don't have a "title" in the church or Church, you're basically ignored. That's not having faith in God; that's being religious. - As far as I'm concerned, being "religious" and having faith in God are not the same thing. Likewise, being a "Christian" and being a believer in the God of the Bible are not the same thing.

    Faith is a personal thing, don't shove yours down others' throats.
    There's a difference between trying to help people - "the lost" - find life after death, and forcing what you believe "down their throats" - an expression I also use, in fact.

    I believe the OP's question was genuine and sincere, not trying to force their beliefs down others' throats. "How can I be closer with my non-Christian friends?" is not forcing anything down their throats. It's a genuinely sincere question. Why must God-believers be segregated? And this coming from an apparent Christian, as well?! It really annoys me when people claim Christians are arrogant when they're just trying to be confident and encouraging. If you believe in something, you're going to speak confidently about it. Someone a couple of weeks ago told me he finds me arrogant in my spiritual beliefs, but except for that he considers me his friend. If I'm his friend, then it's my honour and duty to try and help him with such matters. If I speak weakly and feebly, then he'd not likely believe what I say with conviction. Yet I still can't win, because speaking confidently means I'm arrogant. I couldn't believe he thought that about me. It seems perfectly OK for science to be forced down children's throats in school and them forced to believe it, with arrogant "confident" scientists speaking with conviction, but when a confident God-believer comes along, they are deemed arrogant and forceful. That's a massive bias, and evidently people don't realise it. And that also makes me sick.
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    (Original post by Campo1988)
    The job description of being a Christian - and any religious follower, for that matter, but since the topic is about Christians I'll focus on that - is to help people realise there is an afterlife and make certain they don't go to hell. Christians should be able to accept people for who they are, but ignoring the fact they are going to hell is downright ignorant and careless, and goes against being a Christian, if I may be so bold. How does helping people see life in a different light and in a different way make "the rest of us look bad", when that's what you're supposed to do?!
    Because you don't have the right to do that. Believe whatever the **** you want, but if any religious person starts trying to tell me about how much better life would be as a Christian/Muslim/X, or how I'll go to Hell, I will cut off all contact with you, permanently. Keep your religion to yourself.

    Also, you're supposed to try to convert because a thousands of years old book tells you to. In that case, I should mummify my dead relatives because they'll need their bodies in the ancient Egyptian afterlife.


    (Original post by Campo1988)
    It really annoys me when people claim Christians are arrogant when they're just trying to be confident and encouraging. If you believe in something, you're going to speak confidently about it. Someone a couple of weeks ago told me he finds me arrogant in my spiritual beliefs, but except for that he considers me his friend. If I'm his friend, then it's my honour and duty to try and help him with such matters.
    It's your duty as a friend to accept that he wants nothing to do with your bloody religion, not try to tell him he's in the wrong.


    (Original post by Campo1988)
    If I speak weakly and feebly, then he'd not likely believe what I say with conviction. Yet I still can't win, because speaking confidently means I'm arrogant. I couldn't believe he thought that about me.
    I can, funnily enough.

    (Original post by Campo1988)
    It seems perfectly OK for science to be forced down children's throats in school and them forced to believe it, with arrogant "confident" scientists speaking with conviction,
    How about because there's evidence for science, and not any for religion? Also, you're not forced to believe it - you want to ignore all rational thought, go ahead.

    (Original post by Campo1988)
    but when a confident God-believer comes along, they are deemed arrogant and forceful. That's a massive bias, and evidently people don't realise it. And that also makes me sick.
    Ah well. Get used to it. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    The fact that she's said that she wants to be a good influence on them clearly implies that she wants them to change their ways. It's not acceptable for anyone to partake in a course of action to encourage others to convert, which is what inviting them to pro-Christian events does.

    Also, why the Hell would a Christian ask an atheist to pray with them, when a non-believer thinks prayer is useless? That makes absolutely no sense.
    Just because you are against religion does not mean that it is inherently wrong. There's nothing wrong with converting someone: if a vegetarian friend invited me to an exclusively vegetarian dinner party where they showed a film about how bad meat is for the human digestive system, if i CHOSE to go what is the problem if i then decide that i like my friend's way of life and CHOOSE to become a vegetarian.

    Again, nothing wrong with hoping you'll influence the behaviour of those around you. It's still, afterall, their prerogative to accept your way of doing things or carry on as they were.

    A Christian would because a Christian believes that the prayer will positively impact the non-believer. I think the question you meant to ask was why would an atheist agree to pray with a Christian. I advised offering prayer to an agnostic/someone very accepting. Thus my answer to this would be, at a guess, "it can't hurt, and it might even work".
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    (Original post by jamesetta)
    Just because you are against religion does not mean that it is inherently wrong. There's nothing wrong with converting someone: if a vegetarian friend invited me to an exclusively vegetarian dinner party where they showed a film about how bad meat is for the human digestive system, if i CHOSE to go what is the problem if i then decide that i like my friend's way of life and CHOOSE to become a vegetarian.

    Again, nothing wrong with hoping you'll influence the behaviour of those around you. It's still, afterall, their prerogative to accept your way of doing things or carry on as they were.

    A Christian would because a Christian believes that the prayer will positively impact the non-believer. I think the question you meant to ask was why would an atheist agree to pray with a Christian. I advised offering prayer to an agnostic/someone very accepting. Thus my answer to this would be, at a guess, "it can't hurt, and it might even work".
    There's everything wrong with converting someone. It's arrogant and unreasonable, to say the least.

    OP, please don't attempt this with your friends. You'll most likely end up with none if you do.
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    I am an atheist and I have a Christian friend, who is even quite involved with local groups so I know he takes it seriously. However, we rarely (if ever) discuss religion. The fact is, I am more than just an atheist and he is more than just a Christian. If you literally have so little else to think about when interacting someone, my recommendation would be to get a life. You can't just be one thing. That's depressing.
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    I am a born again Christian and have been for quite some time. I have a good circle of Christian friend but also have some non Christian friends sometimes i find it hard being as close to them as my Christian friends. Any tips on how I can maybe get along better with them and maybe get them involved with Christian activities such as scripture union?
    You don't deserve the amount of criticism you're getting here. I think maybe these types of questions are better for your church groups or other Christian forums.

    Aside from that, I think it's a beautiful thing that you care so deeply about your friends. I find if you live your life in a way that interests people, they will naturally gravitate towards your acitivies. You've already mentioned you're the one they come to when they have problems and that's beautiful. It means they see something in you even if they can't identify what. I'd say don't push anything just wait for the right opportunities. You'll know what to say and do and the right time x
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    There's everything wrong with converting someone. It's arrogant and unreasonable, to say the least.

    OP, please don't attempt this with your friends. You'll most likely end up with none if you do.
    Your response is so short because you've run out of aggressive fallacies to spout as you did in the response to the other guy a few posts up.
    How is it arrogant and unreasonable? Unjustified, and unjustifiable, assertions don't count as a counter-argument.

    "It's your duty as a friend to accept that he wants nothing to do with your bloody religion, not try to tell him he's in the wrong."

    It was unreasonable and arrogant of you to presume to speak for all non-believers, some are tolerant members of society who can accept the views of people different from them and so not all "want nothing to do with your bloody religion". If this were the case why are there millions of converts?

    OP if you approach things sensitively and follow the advice in my first post you'll be fine as you try to share your passion and beliefs with your nearest and dearest.
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    I don't know why you're so hostile - and that is exactly what I was talking about.

    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    Because you don't have the right to do that. Believe whatever the **** you want, but if any religious person starts trying to tell me about how much better life would be as a Christian/Muslim/X, or how I'll go to Hell, I will cut off all contact with you, permanently. Keep your religion to yourself.
    The point being friends. Friendship is a two-way system, not one-way; as my friend you'd be happy to openly and maturely talk about spiritual matters. As your friend, I'd be happy to openly and maturely talk about...whatever it is you are into - obviously I don't know thus far, and I doubt I'm likely to find out. And please tell me where there is a law that says anyone doesn't have a right to be a friend to their friend.

    It's your duty as a friend to accept that he wants nothing to do with your bloody religion, not try to tell him he's in the wrong.
    Due to your lack of knowledge in the conversation you automatically jump to the conclusion I said he was wrong. I never said that at all, so please don't try and put words in my mouth.

    I can, funnily enough.
    Exactly why is that? Obviously you are being arrogant in your reply here. I merely offered an open reply, and someone jumps on top of me.

    How about because there's evidence for science, and not any for religion? Also, you're not forced to believe it - you want to ignore all rational thought, go ahead.
    If you cared to read my comment, I said religion and belief in God are not the same. Plus I can't see anywhere in that where I said I disbelieve science. You inferred what you wanted to, and what you want me to say - I, however, didn't say anything about ignoring science. As a matter of a fact I enjoy science, Astronomy/Cosmology to be exact. I am a little "Trekker" (I don't dress up, nor go to conventions, though); I have a collection of science fiction films and programmes which include I, Robot, Outcasts, and others I enjoy watching; and I have several space-type games that I enjoy playing. You can infer about me what you want, but I never said anything about ignoring science. In school at one point, I was the star student in physics. I might not be great when it comes to maths, but I do like science. I am not into paleontology as much anymore, but I still have a couple-of-hundred-pages book about dinosaurs that I was given when I was a child. I'm not particularly into biology nor chemistry, but sometimes a thing or two interests me.

    I never said I ignore science, and again, don't try and put words in my mouth. As a "rational" thinker, you should have already realised I didn't say I ignore science in favour of spiritual things. Also as a "rational" thinker, you should know science asks "How?"; faith and philosophy asks, "Why?". By all means enjoy your bias. I, on the other hand, am open-minded. But you're evidently not a rational thinker, because you jumped on your high horse and galloped to a conclusion you wanted to see, without rationally thinking about what I actually meant.

    No, I'm not forced to believe it. But according to you, I am not allowed to share it. Who died and made you Emperor of Earth?

    Ah well. Get used to it. :rolleyes:
    Why? Tell me why I should get used to it. There isn't anything to get used to; it already happens in abundance.
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    (Original post by bbybubblez)
    I am a Muslim and one of my best friends is a practicing Christian. And we learn of eachother and it's not a negative ie as a Muslim we have to pray 5 times a day whenever I am with my friend this reminds her to pray and be thankful to her god to


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    There aren't two different Gods. You are both praying to the same God, just through different ways and through alternative scriptures.

    As a Christian, I have friends of all different religions as well as atheists and what I have learned is that you should never get into a discussion of religion because it never ends well! We all have different beliefs and we should respect that and leave it.
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    OP, please don't attempt this with your friends. You'll most likely end up with none if you do.
    Are you speaking from experience?
 
 
 
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