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    Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.
    This should be issued with TSR joining instructions.
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    Wittgenstein on Death :love:

    <3 x
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    'Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must remain silent'

    Still use this one, admittedly it tends to be in response to 'Where is your homework?' :teehee:
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    What have you read of Ludvig's work?
    I haven't really read any of his work the reason I'm interested in him is because we study some of his work on religious language as part of my philosophy and ethics course at A2 level and I really think his ideas on that subject are interesting. I know of the existence of the Tractatus (after which he changes his stance on RL) but that's about it
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    'Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent' unfortunately is one of the widest misunderstood and wrongly applied of Wittgenstein's quotes. Roughly speaking, and this is a gross over-generalisation, it means you cannot talk about the ineffable. But really you need to know about what Wittgenstein was talking about in the Tractatus to fully make sense of it; at the very least, you need to know about the picture theory of language.

    EDIT:

    (Original post by Sherlockedd)
    I haven't really read any of his work the reason I'm interested in him is because we study some of his work on religious language as part of my philosophy and ethics course at A2 level and I really think his ideas on that subject are interesting. I know of the existence of the Tractatus (after which he changes his stance on RL) but that's about it
    If you want to get involved in our reading group for Philosophical Investigations then you'd be more than welcome, even if you only wish to read along with us and learn We'll be going over things as simply as we can so everyone can understand his ideas, and it really helps with Wittgenstein to talk about his ideas and what they mean in wider contexts, particularly on how they may help us face certain problems faced by the modern philosopher.
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    (Original post by Aleandcynicism)
    'Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent' unfortunately is one of the widest misunderstood and wrongly applied of Wittgenstein's quotes. Roughly speaking, and this is a gross over-generalisation, it means you cannot talk about the ineffable. But really you need to know about what Wittgenstein was talking about in the Tractatus to fully make sense of it; at the very least, you need to know about the picture theory of language.

    EDIT:



    If you want to get involved in our reading group for Philosophical Investigations then you'd be more than welcome, even if you only wish to read along with us and learn We'll be going over things as simply as we can so everyone can understand his ideas, and it really helps with Wittgenstein to talk about his ideas and what they mean in wider contexts, particularly on how they may help us face certain problems faced by the modern philosopher.
    Yes I would love to learn more about him and his works, so that'd be fun!
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    (Original post by Sherlockedd)
    Yes I would love to learn more about him and his works, so that'd be fun!
    Start with that book. Philosophical investigations is essentially the 'basics' (though it is complicated) for the rest of his later philosophy, which is much more specific to that end. On Certainty is for example, a very strong application of philosophical investigations on 'knowledge'.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Start with that book. Philosophical investigations is essentially the 'basics' (though it is complicated) for the rest of his later philosophy, which is much more specific to that end. On Certainty is for example, a very strong application of philosophical investigations on 'knowledge'.
    Okey dokey shall do so.
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    (Original post by Sherlockedd)
    Okey dokey shall do so.
    Don't worry if you don't get it, if I re-read it right now I probably wouldn't get all of it without a second reading and some secondary texts.
    And ask questions! The only way to understand these things is to analyse them, and discussions help with that :P .
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    So when would be best for people for this reading group? My exams finish in early May so I'll be fine to start from there, but obviously we'll try to wait until as many people as possible are able to start. And others will be able to join in at whatever stage as well.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Don't worry if you don't get it, if I re-read it right now I probably wouldn't get all of it without a second reading and some secondary texts.
    And ask questions! The only way to understand these things is to analyse them, and discussions help with that :P .
    I will be asking questions, no worries on that front!

    (Original post by Aleandcynicism)
    So when would be best for people for this reading group? My exams finish in early May so I'll be fine to start from there, but obviously we'll try to wait until as many people as possible are able to start. And others will be able to join in at whatever stage as well.
    My last exam is the 19th June
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    I think he's the best looking Philosopher out there. He certainly beats Kant and Hume.
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    (Original post by lornarose)
    I think he's the best looking Philosopher out there. He certainly beats Kant and Hume.
    I couldn't disagree with you more.
    Hume was very much a head of his time. Wittgenstein was as well. Both helped philosophy to mould into what it is today. You can't compare them like that.
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    (Original post by Aleandcynicism)
    (...) We're talking about a man who was one of the richest people in Europe when he was young, only to give away his entire inheritance to live a life of relative austerity. He spent most of his academic career at Cambridge, whilst also throughout his life working as a teacher, a hospital porter, a gardener and an architect. He also made significant contributions to aeronautical engineering and medical research, which a lot of people don't know about. (....)
    !
    I admire the many different skills of Wittgenstein which made him to an all-rounder in my opinion. The first comment arouse my interest, so I want to find out more about Wittgenstein.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I admire the many different skills of Wittgenstein which made him to an all-rounder in my opinion. The first comment arouse my interest, so I want to find out more about Wittgenstein.
    If you're interested in finding more about the man himself then this biography is apparently the way forward. I've never read it myself but I know some who have and they highly recommend it.
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    (Original post by Aleandcynicism)
    If you're interested in finding more about the man himself then this biography is apparently the way forward. I've never read it myself but I know some who have and they highly recommend it.
    Thank you. As far as I know Russell and Wittgenstein were good friends. They have studied at Cambridge at least.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I couldn't disagree with you more.
    Hume was very much a head of his time. Wittgenstein was as well. Both helped philosophy to mould into what it is today. You can't compare them like that.
    I was literally talking about their looks. I think Hume is one of the best philosophers out there - especially as he was so critical of religion in rational terms before that was a common outlook.
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    (Original post by lornarose)
    I was literally talking about their looks. I think Hume is one of the best philosophers out there - especially as he was so critical of religion in rational terms before that was a common outlook.
    Different language games...on a Wittgenstein thread?
    :awesome:
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Different language games...on a Wittgenstein thread?
    :awesome:
    hahahahahahahahahaha :eek: I didn't even realise. Philosophy is taking over my life ((((
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    The Stanford Philosophy Encyclopedia is always worth a mention, it's one of the better sources of very well written, clear expositions of the basics and more advanced material on each key philosopher.

    http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/
 
 
 
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