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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Do you wear the same suit each day? If so, how long do you go with the same suit? (Before everyone thinks you're a tramp who doesn't wash)
    Here's a tip, suits with a little polyester or similar plastic blended in last longer and need far less maintenace than 100% wool. Though try not to get one with too much plastic or you will feel all the static against your legs, it'll be an ugly shiny suit and generally cheap looking. Wearing a different suit each day isn't as important as wearing a different shirt/tie etc. people probably won't even notice. You can also mix the jackets and trousers up and wear them as separates (navy blazer-grey trousers, grey blazer-navy trousers etc.), don't wear colours that are too close though or people will think you just got dressed in the dark.
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    Be happy!

    Wear a white shirt.

    Don't bring your headphones.

    Before you enter your new workplace, go to the restroom, do the superman pose and charge yourself. Then meet the receptionist/whoever.

    My first day was a month a ago, and I'd say mine went pretty well.

    Edit: a tie too! Get a good tie that blends with your suit!

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    (Original post by Tactical Nuclear Penguin)
    Do you wear a waistcoat then? Do people comment or not? Or isn't that what you meant by 3-piece suits?
    Yes, that's what a three piece suit is but I don't understand the relevance to wearing suits two days running?

    If people are making derogatory comments about something as trivial as the clothing you're wearing maybe these aren't the sort of people you want to be working with. If you listen to it then you don't have the sort of conviction that is needed to get anywhere in this career.

    Of course people pass comment, it's something different, just as people comment when someone's wearing something nice, or bright, or garish or expensive looking. I've never had negative comments if that's what you're asking, it's largely neutral, often positive and commenting for the sake of commenting. I get more comments on the cut, material or pattern of my suits and even then it's few and far between. I'll reiterate, no one cares what you wear and if someone does comment it's largely to break up the monotony of the day.

    If someone takes the piss then say something about their horrible cheap polyester suit or laugh it off, most people are just trying to see how you react. If you want to wear a three piece then wear one.
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    Oh man, I only have one suit. I've never had to wear a suit before (other than interviews & prom).

    The jacket is dark grey, and I only have trousers in the same colour or black. Maybe i'll need to go shopping

    And I only have a black tie and a white tie. White tie + white shirt doesn't go! :P
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Oh man, I only have one suit. I've never had to wear a suit before (other than interviews & prom).

    The jacket is dark grey, and I only have trousers in the same colour or black. Maybe i'll need to go shopping

    And I only have a black tie and a white tie. White tie + white shirt doesn't go! :P
    I would recommend a second suit but it doesn't have to be expensive, especially as a new joiner. You can get ties and shirts fairly cheap nowadays. Do you not get an advance or a loan for this sort of thing?
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    (Original post by Brotherhood)
    I would recommend a second suit but it doesn't have to be expensive, especially as a new joiner. You can get ties and shirts fairly cheap nowadays. Do you not get an advance or a loan for this sort of thing?
    I'm not too sure. It's only a small firm so probably not. I'll have to have a look in some cheapish shops to see what I can find
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Oh man, I only have one suit. I've never had to wear a suit before (other than interviews & prom).

    The jacket is dark grey, and I only have trousers in the same colour or black. Maybe i'll need to go shopping

    And I only have a black tie and a white tie. White tie + white shirt doesn't go! :P
    You'll be at work 5 days a week, every week. Would you wear the same jeans and t-shirt every day at uni? Of course you need more than 1 suit! It's worth getting decent ones, as cheap ones feel horrible and won't last.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    You'll be at work 5 days a week, every week. Would you wear the same jeans and t-shirt every day at uni? Of course you need more than 1 suit! It's worth getting decent ones, as cheap ones feel horrible and won't last.
    When I had to wear trousers & a blazer at school I used to wear the trousers for a week and change shirt each day, unless I made the trousers dirty somehow.

    How much would you say a decent one is?
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    When I had to wear trousers & a blazer at school I used to wear the trousers for a week and change shirt each day, unless I made the trousers dirty somehow.

    How much would you say a decent one is?
    You're not at school any more, you're a paid, client facing, professional!

    Personally I'd say circa £200 for a decent suit, but others might say more/less.
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    (Original post by M1011)
    You're not at school any more, you're a paid, client facing, professional!

    Personally I'd say circa £200 for a decent suit, but others might say more/less.
    Hmm that's true lol. I'll have a look round. Why do suits have to be so expensive? :o:$
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Hmm that's true lol. I'll have a look round. Why do suits have to be so expensive? :o:$
    Try shopping at designer shopping outlets, you can pick up suits that retailed for over £400 for around £150. The closest one to London is Ashford (heard it isn't great). The one I've been to most is Cheshire Oaks and it is wonderful. There's 5 or so shops specific for suits and really smart dress and it's definitely worth it for a day out or something just to buy a couple of suits.
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    (Original post by Makebelieve15)
    Try shopping at designer shopping outlets, you can pick up suits that retailed for over £400 for around £150. The closest one to London is Ashford (heard it isn't great). The one I've been to most is Cheshire Oaks and it is wonderful. There's 5 or so shops specific for suits and really smart dress and it's definitely worth it for a day out or something just to buy a couple of suits.
    Thanks, i'll have a look for one near me
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    Hey guys! So I have finally been given notice of when I start work, which is in two weeks

    I'm excited but really nervous at the same time. I don't really know what to expect, or what they expect from me, especially knowledge wise. In a way, it's a bit different from some graduate roles in that, because some of their applicants come from non-finance backgrounds, so they're not really expected to know anything.

    My role will be an assistant accountant at a procurement organisation. At first, I thought it was mainly in a management accounts setting, but during the interviews, I was told that it was a role to support both the management and (financial) reporting side, which I think is a great way to immerse myself in everything.

    I think I'll be revising the basic stuff such as double entry, reconciliations, accruals and such; also, spreadsheet functions such as pivot tables and lookups.

    Has anyone got anymore advice? What do you reckon it is they would expect from someone who's just basically starting up in finance (though coming from a finance graduate)? Is there anything else I need to familiarise myself with?

    Apologies if the questions seem silly, but I'm just nervous, and it would be nice if I could prepare myself the best I can before I start work. Thanks in advance
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    Good luck buddy.

    It's okay to sound silly. I did two months ago. And now... In having lunch with the finance team now.


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    (Original post by Tactical Nuclear Penguin)
    On placement I swapped most days pretty much, especially when at a client

    That's the problem, don't want to be 'marked' early as 'eccentric' or similar. Could be better to blend into the crowd etc?
    Sorry I just negged you by accident whilst reading your comment, please don't take it personally

    Haven't got much to comment here, but one thing to remember is - everyone feels this nervous on the first day, it's natural. A week in, you'll hopefully be relaxed and starting to feel right at home
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    (Original post by jamesmiguel)
    Haven't got much to comment here, but one thing to remember is - everyone feels this nervous on the first day, it's natural. A week in, you'll hopefully be relaxed and starting to feel right at home
    Haha, that's bit too soon/optimistic, don't you reckon? I wish it turns out that way though! I think my apprehension just comes from the fact that I don't really know what to expect from them, what exactly is expected of me in my first few days (if that makes sense).
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    Haha, that's bit too soon/optimistic, don't you reckon? I wish it turns out that way though! I think my apprehension just comes from the fact that I don't really know what to expect from them, what exactly is expected of me in my first few days (if that makes sense).
    So I've been at my new job for about a week and a half now, and I'd just like to share what I've been up to in that time. Perhaps you guys would like to share and compare first day/week/month/etc at the job experiences, too, which would be nice.

    Let me start off with saying that I work for a procurement organisation, so I don't know how the work or style of work differs from those of you working in practice. My title is an assistant accountant, and basically I get to hover between financial and management accounts, which I like, as I get exposure to the various areas of accountancy.

    The majority of my first day was a standard induction process - forms to fill in, logging on to the computer and getting activated, being introduced around the office (everyone seems nice and welcoming), and a quick tour round the whole building.

    I was then quickly briefed into something called Intrastat, which I will mainly be involved with. It's nothing much, and what it essentially entails is collecting the relevant information from invoices we receive from our suppliers and recording them on to a spreadsheet, which would then go on to be reported to Customs.

    Over the next few days, I've been gradually introduced to other regular tasks such as the bank reconciliations, updating the trading report and updating the accruals/prepayments spreadsheets.

    I've heard a lot of people say how some of these things are a bit menial, and the "real work" comes once I am given more responsibilities, but I genuinely enjoyed getting immersed into these tasks, and it felt like a nice leap from applying what you've learnt at university into the real world. Here, you are working with a huge set of data, so, whilst the core process remains the same, working with a lot of data on a spreadsheet may sometimes mean that you'll have to break down your steps a bit further. Or you may find that you could reach your goal a slightly different way, too.

    There have been a couple of brief occassions of downtime - people on my department having meetings or other engagements, etc - which is understandable. For any newbies who may be faced with something similar, I would suggest just using that spare time reading through any documents regarding work that you may have, which may help you understand the company/the work itself more. You could also use this as a chance of making notes on what you've learnt so far.

    As a piece of advice, I can't help but reiterate the importance of asking questions. Although you might think that you're a bit of an annoyance to your supervisor/colleagues when you ask a lot of questions, but if they are very understanding, they would just be more than happy to pass on their knowledge to you. In the grand scheme of things, it is to everyone's benefit the more that you adjust and become more comfortable with your new job, and helping you out with answers to your questions is one of the things that'll get you there.

    Overall, my first week or so at work has gone well, and I hope to learn more in the coming weeks.

    Anyway, that was my own experience. I don't know if it is similar to anyone, although it would surely be nice to hear about them as well.
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    So I've been at my new job for about a week and a half now, and I'd just like to share what I've been up to in that time. Perhaps you guys would like to share and compare first day/week/month/etc at the job experiences, too, which would be nice.

    Let me start off with saying that I work for a procurement organisation, so I don't know how the work or style of work differs from those of you working in practice. My title is an assistant accountant, and basically I get to hover between financial and management accounts, which I like, as I get exposure to the various areas of accountancy.

    The majority of my first day was a standard induction process - forms to fill in, logging on to the computer and getting activated, being introduced around the office (everyone seems nice and welcoming), and a quick tour round the whole building.

    I was then quickly briefed into something called Intrastat, which I will mainly be involved with. It's nothing much, and what it essentially entails is collecting the relevant information from invoices we receive from our suppliers and recording them on to a spreadsheet, which would then go on to be reported to Customs.

    Over the next few days, I've been gradually introduced to other regular tasks such as the bank reconciliations, updating the trading report and updating the accruals/prepayments spreadsheets.

    I've heard a lot of people say how some of these things are a bit menial, and the "real work" comes once I am given more responsibilities, but I genuinely enjoyed getting immersed into these tasks, and it felt like a nice leap from applying what you've learnt at university into the real world. Here, you are working with a huge set of data, so, whilst the core process remains the same, working with a lot of data on a spreadsheet may sometimes mean that you'll have to break down your steps a bit further. Or you may find that you could reach your goal a slightly different way, too.

    There have been a couple of brief occassions of downtime - people on my department having meetings or other engagements, etc - which is understandable. For any newbies who may be faced with something similar, I would suggest just using that spare time reading through any documents regarding work that you may have, which may help you understand the company/the work itself more. You could also use this as a chance of making notes on what you've learnt so far.

    As a piece of advice, I can't help but reiterate the importance of asking questions. Although you might think that you're a bit of an annoyance to your supervisor/colleagues when you ask a lot of questions, but if they are very understanding, they would just be more than happy to pass on their knowledge to you. In the grand scheme of things, it is to everyone's benefit the more that you adjust and become more comfortable with your new job, and helping you out with answers to your questions is one of the things that'll get you there.

    Overall, my first week or so at work has gone well, and I hope to learn more in the coming weeks.

    Anyway, that was my own experience. I don't know if it is similar to anyone, although it would surely be nice to hear about them as well.

    I started two weeks ago so I can give my experience. I work in a small practice with two offices and 3 partners.

    On my first day: Standard induction stuff- going through the paperwork signing everything, talked through the employee handbook, tour of the office/ meet partners and everyone and finally money laundering thing (read some information then answer questions)

    Then I started an online book keeping course to give me some basic knowledge of debit/credit stuff. That kept me quiet for the first few days whilst I worked my way through.

    After that I started working on some accounts prep. This is where you are given a cash book/ invoices and you have to analyse it out onto a spreadsheet and make sure it balances. Then you complete the other spreadsheets and upload it all onto the system under the right heading.

    After that I did another one, this time with just the bank statements.

    The first two were pretty tricky as many statements and transactions were missing, so they decided it would be better to give it to a more experienced person.

    The third one was good. I was guided through it all by my 'mentor' and he told me all the stuff to do and how to do it.

    Then I've just started my fourth one which I feel I can do fairly well. I'm carrying on with it on my third week (tomorrow). Obviously i'll still need help but I think i'm getting what to do now.

    As a piece of advice, I can't help but reiterate the importance of asking questions. Although you might think that you're a bit of an annoyance to your supervisor/colleagues when you ask a lot of questions, but if they are very understanding, they would just be more than happy to pass on their knowledge to you. In the grand scheme of things, it is to everyone's benefit the more that you adjust and become more comfortable with your new job, and helping you out with answers to your questions is one of the things that'll get you there.
    Yeah. It's so difficult when you know your assigned mentor has work to do and deadlines to meet. It's especially hard when you know they are on a tight deadline. What I suggest is to have a few people who you can ask for advice. This way you can spread your questions out between them and you don't feel like you're annoying one person. People are nice. They will help you (as they were in your shoes not so long ago). Just don't sit there worrying about asking questions because they will assume you are doing fine.

    One more good point if you worry about asking questions is to have someone who sits at another desk who you can ask questions to. This means to ask them a question you have to get up and walk to them, so you can force yourself to get up and you'll have to go and speak to them. (Sounds odd I know but it helps)

    And for anyone starting soon, for the first few days you will be out of your depth and wondering if this is the right path for you. Stick at it because it feels good when you start to understand what you're doing, even if it is just analysing a set of bank statements!
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    I started two weeks ago so I can give my experience. I work in a small practice with two offices and 3 partners.
    Thanks for sharing! It's always interesting to read about the experiences of people in a similar boat. Do you work in a particular area?

    (Original post by Runninground)
    Yeah. It's so difficult when you know your assigned mentor has work to do and deadlines to meet. It's especially hard when you know they are on a tight deadline. What I suggest is to have a few people who you can ask for advice. This way you can spread your questions out between them and you don't feel like you're annoying one person. People are nice. They will help you (as they were in your shoes not so long ago). Just don't sit there worrying about asking questions because they will assume you are doing fine.

    One more good point if you worry about asking questions is to have someone who sits at another desk who you can ask questions to. This means to ask them a question you have to get up and walk to them, so you can force yourself to get up and you'll have to go and speak to them. (Sounds odd I know but it helps)

    And for anyone starting soon, for the first few days you will be out of your depth and wondering if this is the right path for you. Stick at it because it feels good when you start to understand what you're doing, even if it is just analysing a set of bank statements!
    This week's truly been a test of sticking to my own advice - month end! Prior this week, I felt being liberal with the questions, but this week, just knowing that they're bogged down with their own tasks in trying to get the monthly accounts/reports done, I found it difficult ask as much questions as I would've wished.

    The bit in bold is very true. The amount of spreadsheets and variety of ways with which you can gather the information you needs alone made me feel like I was at a dizzying height, and I constantly wonder whether it would just one day all make sense to me, when everything would just click into place.

    That said, I have found bits and pieces clicking together. For instance, as sad as it sounds, I find it fascinating just clicking around areas in the spreadsheet, looking at the formulas and seeing how it relates to different tabs in that file or indeed, other spreadsheets. Just by this, I feel like I've learnt more.

    I think I'm a lot more confident at the bank recs now. Going forward, I think I still have to practice my accruals and prepayments, as it still sometimes confuses me.
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    Thanks for sharing! It's always interesting to read about the experiences of people in a similar boat. Do you work in a particular area?

    This week's truly been a test of sticking to my own advice - month end! Prior this week, I felt being liberal with the questions, but this week, just knowing that they're bogged down with their own tasks in trying to get the monthly accounts/reports done, I found it difficult ask as much questions as I would've wished.

    The bit in bold is very true. The amount of spreadsheets and variety of ways with which you can gather the information you needs alone made me feel like I was at a dizzying height, and I constantly wonder whether it would just one day all make sense to me, when everything would just click into place.

    That said, I have found bits and pieces clicking together. For instance, as sad as it sounds, I find it fascinating just clicking around areas in the spreadsheet, looking at the formulas and seeing how it relates to different tabs in that file or indeed, other spreadsheets. Just by this, I feel like I've learnt more.

    I think I'm a lot more confident at the bank recs now. Going forward, I think I still have to practice my accruals and prepayments, as it still sometimes confuses me.
    I'm doing the accounts prep for Sole traders/limited companies, along with the tax returns & tax comps. I found that the first job I did I was like 'Right i'm going to check all of these figures twice and check the formulas and get someone else to check it for me to make sure it's right, because if I get it wrong it will be difficult to find the error' but then you realise that if the bank balances then you've probably got it right, so you don't have to check it over and over.

    I like it when I open up a spreadsheet and manage to work out where all the figures come from so I can do this years one correctly. (It's also very exciting when you've just spent most of the day analysing the bank payments and receipts and the bank actually balances )

    I also get a bit confused over the accruals and prepayments. I find it easier to write out the months and actually count it. If I can find when the payment was made and how much it was, then I can count how many months were prepaid then multiply the cost by the number of prepaid months divided by 12 (:lolwut:). If I can't find the payment then I get stuck.

    What i'm wondering is if I will be doing accounts prep all the time whilst being a student? I'm getting the hang of it now so I reckon in a month or so i'll be able to do them without needing much help. Unless they are giving me the easy jobs, I think it would get a bit boring doing it over and over again?
 
 
 
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