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    Firstly, sorry if you thought I was calling you dim - I think there is a subtle difference between calling someone dim and saying that something might make other people think they are dim. Clearly you aren't dim or you wouldn't have a first in physics. It was the wrong work to use, I was being flippant, my point is that it doesn't make you look as well thought out as some. I'm just trying to explain how employers may think and how I was trained to think when I was in that role, so that you don't make decisions you regret. I completely see where you are coming from, but for an employer it is about making a wise decision and reducing risk. What employers don't want is to invest in you by giving you a graduate role and for you then to leave - for not only does that cost them money that they can't recoup, but it also leaves them with a staffing issue. I don't think anyone is going to turn their nose up at having ACA after their name regardless of what they do. But, if it is unbearable or you think you are going to end up failing, then leave. If you are really finishing work at 5.30pm everyday and only having to give up going out for 2 weeks before exams, can you do something more interesting in the rest of your time for two and a half years?
    I suppose I'm just sick of people telling me what I can and can't do it life, when in my opinion life is for living and taking risks - as long as the risk doesn't take me out the job market for eternity!
    who is telling you what you can or can't do in life? l don't think anyone is on here, people are just giving the other point for view.
    After being brought up with money, I find myself in an identity crisis where half of me wants to live in a mansion sipping champagne when i'm older and the other half wants to shun money and live in a monastery in Tibet. It's finding the right balance that is the difficult part and i'd imagine it's gonna take a lot of time and reflection
    I think it is hard if you have been brought up comfortably, to consider how it would be not to have that financial backing. But if you finish your training contract and get ACA behind you, it would make you credible in all sorts of ways - you could set up a travel company and you would be more credible to banks and suppliers/clients, you could work for a charity, you could work for six months of the year and travel for six months.
    Thanks for the message and i'd appreciate some more advice if it's going
    Feel free to ask.
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    Thanks again. I was only pulling your leg about the 'dim' comment, it's ok - i know you didn't mean it!

    Apologies if i've rubbed any up the wrong way - I have a tendency for the melodramatic at times I know. I'm just quite passionate about this obviously but I do appreciate people's opinions.

    I just find it uninspiring and incredibly dull. I've started a few other hobbies and I keep busy out of work but it's not really enough when my head is in the clouds all day. If I decide to stay in finance, then I'll consider staying as, yes an ACA is great, but leaving finance altogether is my current agenda so it may be entirely superfluous anyway.

    I guess I need a long hard think and a bit of patience - which is difficult as patience is exactly what I lack!

    Anyways, thanks for the advice - it's good to hear what future employers may be thinking. I'm going to private message you if that's ok?
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    with the physics background and (i assume!) a strong quantitative skillset and aptitude, why haven't you considered something more technical like programming, IT, actuarial work. there are even some physicists working in engineering roles in oil & gas.

    wouldn't this be a better fit to your interests and abilities, and perhaps hold your attention better day to day?

    worth bearing in mind that most jobs have a substantial element of the routine and mundane. an unfortunate fact of life.
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    (Original post by jordforce)
    Thanks again. I was only pulling your leg about the 'dim' comment, it's ok - i know you didn't mean it!

    Apologies if i've rubbed any up the wrong way - I have a tendency for the melodramatic at times I know. I'm just quite passionate about this obviously but I do appreciate people's opinions.

    I just find it uninspiring and incredibly dull. I've started a few other hobbies and I keep busy out of work but it's not really enough when my head is in the clouds all day. If I decide to stay in finance, then I'll consider staying as, yes an ACA is great, but leaving finance altogether is my current agenda so it may be entirely superfluous anyway.

    I guess I need a long hard think and a bit of patience - which is difficult as patience is exactly what I lack!

    Anyways, thanks for the advice - it's good to hear what future employers may be thinking. I'm going to private message you if that's ok?

    Is it possible to transfer to a different department in your first 2 years or possible to get a secondment??
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    (Original post by mary26)
    Is it possible to transfer to a different department in your first 2 years or possible to get a secondment??
    Highly unlikely.
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    (Original post by mary26)
    Is it possible to transfer to a different department in your first 2 years or possible to get a secondment??
    Secondments are very common (in the firm I work for, one of the big4), for between 1-3 months at a time, ie quite short ones. Permanent moves are rare during your first 2-3 years, in fact I don't know anyone who has done one, but people often do secondments with a view to moving as soon as they qualify.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Secondments are very common (in the firm I work for, one of the big4), for between 1-3 months at a time, ie quite short ones. Permanent moves are rare during your first 2-3 years, in fact I don't know anyone who has done one, but people often do secondments with a view to moving as soon as they qualify.
    Rare in the first two years though, it depends if the other department has a big project on and thus is in need of staff, it's not a standard opportunity afforded to everyone every year. At least where I am.
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    (Original post by Brotherhood)
    Rare in the first two years though, it depends if the other department has a big project on and thus is in need of staff, it's not a standard opportunity afforded to everyone every year. At least where I am.
    If it's not possible to move during your training contract, is there any chance you could give me some idea of how easy it is to move departments at the end of the three years, when you are a qualified CA?

    I'm asking as I am most interested by the finance type roles that are offered by the Big 4 (specifically transaction services) but get the impression they are significantly more competitive than assurance positions. Given I don't have the most impressive academics and the fact that I wouldn't really consider not working in London, I thought it might be wise to try and apply for financial services audit after I graduate and then try and make the move to transaction services/corporate finance/valuations after I qualify. As a current Big 4 employee, what would your thoughts be on this?

    Sorry if it seems like I'm hijacking the thread btw! I thought it was fairly relevant but don't mind making a thread if need be...
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    (Original post by UKiwi)
    If it's not possible to move during your training contract, is there any chance you could give me some idea of how easy it is to move departments at the end of the three years, when you are a qualified CA?

    I'm asking as I am most interested by the finance type roles that are offered by the Big 4 (specifically transaction services) but get the impression they are significantly more competitive than assurance positions. Given I don't have the most impressive academics and the fact that I wouldn't really consider not working in London, I thought it might be wise to try and apply for financial services audit after I graduate and then try and make the move to transaction services/corporate finance/valuations after I qualify. As a current Big 4 employee, what would your thoughts be on this?

    Sorry if it seems like I'm hijacking the thread btw! I thought it was fairly relevant but don't mind making a thread if need be...
    Quite easy, I've enquired about this with some ACAs, a lot go to move to glamorous things like capital markets and banks etc.
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    Hello

    I don't know if this is helpful (or if it's been said cos I only skim read the whole thread) but you can get your accounting experience in other departments than audit.

    I know companies like PwC and BDO have a forensics accounting department, so you could always ask for a secondment to something like that if your company offered it?

    There are other departments that meet the requirements of an ACCA contract too, like Business Recovery, Corporate Finance and so on (depends on the company obviously).

    Hope this is helpful

    Also, how did you find the non-maths parts of the ACCA exams? I study Maths and am hoping to get a contract, but I worry about the business, law, etc parts.

 
 
 
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