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    (Original post by tazmaniac97)
    So was what I said wrong? Sorry I don't know what you mean by molecular and atomic orbitals, how are they different and what exactly are they? (never come across them before- actually I've heard of atomic orbitals but not molecular)
    You will have heard of these orbitals, but they are described like orbits like the moon orbits the earth etc. The name is presumably a relic of the 1st early models of the atoms.
    These orbitals are a region in space in which the electrons are confined (strictly, only confined in the sense that it is very unlikely that they will be found outside the region)
    Molecular orbitals are formed by the overlap of 2 or more atomic orbitals. Orbitals are mathematical functions, so think of the MO as a sum of the AO's. They take on part of the character of each AO. They are in principle no different, there are just more nuclei involved.
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    (Original post by tazmaniac97)
    So was what I said wrong? Sorry I don't know what you mean by molecular and atomic orbitals, how are they different and what exactly are they? (never come across them before- actually I've heard of atomic orbitals but not molecular)
    OK, it's pretty clear that we are talking levels here.

    Much of this stuff is probably over your head because you are not studying at this level, but here goes, simplified as much as possible:

    Electrons exist around atoms in energy levels and within each level there are regions of space where it is most likely that pairs of electrons exist. These are called orbitals.

    These regions of space were first elucidated in the mid 20th century using complicated applied maths (Schröedinger)

    However, once a molecule is formed the whole fundamental structure changes because there is now more than one nuclear center.

    The regions of space in which the electrons are now housed (probably) are called molecular orbitals (as opposed to atomic orbitals) and have different shapes and energies.

    Formation of molecules from atoms is energetically favourable as the process lowers the overall energy of the system. And if it isn't favourable between two atoms then no bond is formed.

    There are various theories that aim to take you through the process of bond formation, including the one that you are probably familiar with from school, which is sharing electrons.

    These theories have their merit as they are 'age appropriate' and help students to understand the basic ideas, but they do not offer explanations when someone wants to push forward.

    The best advice I can give is for you to understand and use the ideas you are studying, but be aware that these concepts are very much simplified and that there is much more sophistication waiting for you around the corner ...
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    (Original post by charco)
    OK, it's pretty clear that we are talking levels here.

    Much of this stuff is probably over your head because you are not studying at this level, but here goes, simplified as much as possible:

    Electrons exist around atoms in energy levels and within each level there are regions of space where it is most likely that pairs of electrons exist. These are called orbitals.

    These regions of space were first elucidated in the mid 20th century using complicated applied maths (Schröedinger)

    However, once a molecule is formed the whole fundamental structure changes because there is now more than one nuclear center.

    The regions of space in which the electrons are now housed (probably) are called molecular orbitals (as opposed to atomic orbitals) and have different shapes and energies.

    Formation of molecules from atoms is energetically favourable as the process lowers the overall energy of the system. And if it isn't favourable between two atoms then no bond is formed.

    There are various theories that aim to take you through the process of bond formation, including the one that you are probably familiar with from school, which is sharing electrons.

    These theories have their merit as they are 'age appropriate' and help students to understand the basic ideas, but they do not offer explanations when someone wants to push forward.

    The best advice I can give is for you to understand and use the ideas you are studying, but be aware that these concepts are very much simplified and that there is much more sophistication waiting for you around the corner ...
    This has finally cleared things up thank you very much. I hate the fact that the stuff we learn is so vague, I can't just accept things and just memorise them, I think that's my problem so I try researching deeper into the topic and end up confusing myself
 
 
 
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