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    (Original post by pane123)
    Then we don't need to be told that it's unlikely to happen, either.
    We had even less need for you to tell us that we didn't need to be told that it's unlikely to happen
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    We had even less need for you to tell us that we didn't need to be told that it's unlikely to happen

    do not do bickering, please.



    how is blind person knowing what right angle looks like?
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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    do not do bickering, please.



    how is blind person knowing what right angle looks like?
    By your own admission, the blind person has developed the ability to see?

    Then by analyzing his memories of how his hands moved over the shape, he could infer that the smooth object obviously contains no such features, and thereby choose correctly
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    (Original post by MattKneale)
    On another related note, if someone was born deaf and their hearing was restored, could they distinguish between high and low pitch?
    Couldn't they do that anyway, even while deaf? You can feel sound (especially in your stomach) even if not through your ears.

    Well, low pitch and high volume anyway. I'm not sure about high pitch.
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    Couldn't they do that anyway, even while deaf? You can feel sound (especially in your stomach) even if not through your ears.

    Well, low pitch and high volume anyway. I'm not sure about high pitch.
    Yeah true. Can't certain low pitches give you the ****s?
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    (Original post by MattKneale)
    Yeah true. Can't certain low pitches give you the ****s?
    Brown note?

    I think it has been debunked, but because there are always exceptions to the rule, I wouldn't want to be hearing it at full volume.
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    By your own admission, the blind person has developed the ability to see?

    Then by analyzing his memories of how his hands moved over the shape, he could infer that the smooth object obviously contains no such features, and thereby choose correctly
    how can he ascribe any visual information to his memories of his hand movements over the shape?
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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    how can he ascribe any visual information to his memories of his hand movements over the shape?
    If the two test objects were defined by size instead of shape (e.g., object A is large and object B is small), memories of hand movements should provide clues for interpreting the visual information.

    The key problem, as I've said before, is that interpreting a visual scene is a complex process. Sensing photons that fall on the retina is not the same as making sense of objects in the visual field. When you say that the hypothetical subject can suddenly see, the answer depends on how much of the visual processing chain has been restored. If only the retina has been repaired, the visual cortex would almost certainly be unable to make sense of the pixels, because the visual cortex has had no training. If the entire chain has been repaired, then by definition the subject can already tell the difference between sphere and cube.
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    (Original post by Pastaferian)
    If the two test objects were defined by size instead of shape (e.g., object A is large and object B is small), memories of hand movements should provide clues for interpreting the visual information.

    The key problem, as I've said before, is that interpreting a visual scene is a complex process. Sensing photons that fall on the retina is not the same as making sense of objects in the visual field. When you say that the hypothetical subject can suddenly see, the answer depends on how much of the visual processing chain has been restored. If only the retina has been repaired, the visual cortex would almost certainly be unable to make sense of the pixels, because the visual cortex has had no training. If the entire chain has been repaired, then by definition the subject can already tell the difference between sphere and cube.
    You are missing the questioning


    It is one thing to feel the size of an object, is another thing to see the size of an object


    How does the person translate the feeling of big/small to the visual appearance of big/small

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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    You are missing the questioning
    It is one thing to feel the size of an object, is another thing to see the size of an object
    How does the person translate the feeling of big/small to the visual appearance of big/small
    I think I didn't explain my answer clearly enough - I'll try again...

    If the blind person is suddenly equipped with a fully functioning visual processing system, with all the benefits of training that a sighted person's daily experience provides, then by definition the once-blind person would have no difficulty differentiating between objects. But if the visual processing system is not fully functioning, then the answer to your question depends on which bits of it are/aren't working.
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    (Original post by Pastaferian)
    I think I didn't explain my answer clearly enough - I'll try again...

    If the blind person is suddenly equipped with a fully functioning visual processing system, with all the benefits of training that a sighted person's daily experience provides, then by definition the once-blind person would have no difficulty differentiating between objects. But if the visual processing system is not fully functioning, then the answer to your question depends on which bits of it are/aren't working.
    The blind person is fully equipped. Completely. Like how you are seeing now.

    Obviously, visually, the once blind person is now able telling difference between sphere and cube, just like how you can telling difference between sphere and cube.

    How does the blind person know which one is the sphere and which on is the cube? He has felt them before when he is blind and has associated the names to how they feel. How can he tell which one is which without touching them, now that he is have full vision?



    (Original post by MattKneale)
    Yes. You would remember the feeling of smoothness of the sphere, and the abrupt ends on each side of the cube. By looking, you could see the object which has edges -- the cube.
    How does person know what smooth looks like or what edges look like?


    (Original post by Jacob :))
    Yes. If you close your eyes and feel two irregular shapes with your eyes closed then open them most people could tell you which shape was which by just looking.

    And blind people can be racist.
    Well done for the PhD thesis. I am agree.

    Now back to the question of this thread. If a person is born blind and then made to see (for the first time), can he tell which one is being the sphere and which one is being the cube just by looking at them?
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    (Original post by Mullah.S)
    How does person know what smooth looks like or what edges look like?
    They will have a concept of when something can start and when something ends. If you use your hand to distinguish something which never ends (a ball) and something which does (the cube) you will have an inate sense of continuity? I don't know :P
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    (Original post by MattKneale)
    They will have a concept of when something can start and when something ends. If you use your hand to distinguish something which never ends (a ball) and something which does (the cube) you will have an inate sense of continuity? I don't know :P
    Can you understanding why is interesting question?
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    yes because he has touched a knife so he can associate thiness with sharpness. Edges are sharp compared to a smooth sphere. If a doctor accompanied him he would be calm and would be able to differentiate as easy as maths.
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    In 2003, Pawan Sinha, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, set up a program in the framework of the Project Prakash[8] and eventually had the opportunity to find five individuals who satisfied the requirements for an experiment aimed at answering Molyneux's question experimentally. Prior to treatment, the subjects (aged 8 to 17) were only able to discriminate between light and dark, with two of them also being able to determine the direction of a bright light. The surgical treatments took place between 2007 and 2010, and quickly brought the relevant subject from total congenital blindness to fully seeing. A carefully designed test was submitted to each subject within the next 48 hours. Based on its result, the experimenters concluded that the answer, in short, to Molyneux's problem is "no". Although after restoration of sight, the subjects could distinguish between objects visually almost as effectively as they would do by touch alone, they were unable to form the connection between an object perceived using the two different senses. The correlation was barely better than if the subjects had guessed. They had no innate ability to transfer their tactile shape knowledge to the visual domain. However, the experimenters could test three of the five subjects on later dates (5 days, 7 days, and 5 months after, respectively) and found that the performance in the touch-to-vision case improved significantly, reaching 80–90%.[9][10][11]

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    Obviously from wikipedia: Full page :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molyneux%27s_problem
 
 
 
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