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    I think that entire RGU guarantees employment is not true, for now, for international students. Perhaps it was a couple of years ago, but definitely not now. This mostly has to do with the UK law of preferring UK citizens, then EU then Tier 4s. Its almost false advertising at this point...

    Also before applying for the university, I think its worthwhile to somehow findout how many students are usually expected in a year for a program and how classes are structured.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I work in industry and know of a lot of people, some of whom very high up now, who have done the MSc in oil & gas/offshore engineering. In reality the core content of both degrees looks very similar, although the Aberdeen one seems to have a slightly greater subsurface focus, whereas the RGU one has a slightly broader engineering focus.

    Aberdeen has a good name and connections, but so does RGU. One good thing about RGU is that it really tries hard to ensure good employer contact, which is reflected in the amount of employers that turned up the careers fairs I was at there, and the amount that visit the campus and who offer scholarships to undergrads. Not worth paying thousands of pounds extra for, if that's what they're charging (I know RGU can be on the pricey side compared to Aberdeen), but it's definitely something to think about, especially if the course is also more appealing too.
    I dont think the Aberdeen course is still relatively new, and I don't think RGU has a slightly broader engineering focus as well.

    My friend did Oil & Gas Structural Engineering from Aberdeen University, who got a job offered from shell singapore once he graduated(2012).
    He told me, all his friends got job offered within one month.

    http://www.agr.com/news/agr-s-tracs-...neering-course

    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/courses/...gas_structural

    http://www.capturing-the-energy.org.uk/news.php
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    Just saying, when I speak of employment offers, I mean here in the UK. If the country your coming from has foreign operators or service companies (Shell, BP etc) doing business, getting a job back at your home country when applying to those operators here is pretty much guaranteed.

    But does RGU have an edge over other universities in scotland (UA, HW), in this area? I dont think so.
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    (Original post by catinahat)
    Just saying, when I speak of employment offers, I mean here in the UK. If the country your coming from has foreign operators or service companies (Shell, BP etc) doing business, getting a job back at your home country when applying to those operators here is pretty much guaranteed.

    But does RGU have an edge over other universities in scotland (UA, HW), in this area? I dont think so.
    Catinahat,
    One of his friends from Aberdeen, who works in shell uk since 2009.
    To be honest, Aberdeen University is very dedicated in this field.
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    (Original post by waynelaw)
    Catinahat,
    One of his friends from Aberdeen, who works in shell uk since 2009.
    To be honest, Aberdeen University is very dedicated in this field.

    I want to understand something, please does it mean that having oil and gas engineering degree from Aberdeen guarantees jobs in other countries, since Uni of Aberdeen is well known?
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    (Original post by Kunle Junior)
    I want to understand something, please does it mean that having oil and gas engineering degree from Aberdeen guarantees jobs in other countries, since Uni of Aberdeen is well known?
    This might be one of the reasons too, but the candidates have to perform well during the job interview.

    Aberdeen is one of the top 200 universities in the world, and so highly respected in the worldwide.
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    (Original post by waynelaw)
    This might be one of the reasons too, but the candidates have to perform well during the job interview.

    Aberdeen is one of the top 200 universities in the world, and so highly respected in the worldwide.

    Thank you for the quick response .Appreciate.
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    (Original post by c2uk)
    Always good to know whether somebody really knows what he's talking about or not - but how do you explain the poor experience of the current student in this thread? Based on that, and a few other things I've heard about RGU - though admittedly in a different field, I wouldn't go anywhere near that programme.
    I don't, since I didn't do an MSc.

    (Original post by waynelaw)
    I dont think the Aberdeen course is still relatively new, and I don't think RGU has a slightly broader engineering focus as well.
    The differences in modules clearly shows that there is a slight difference in the courses. Aberdeen is teaching the subsurface aspect in greater detail, as they have two modules covering it, likely because they have an established geology and petroleum engineering faculty. They're also teaching some chemistry and flow assurance too, likely leveraging on their chemistry and chemical engineering departments.

    RGU is teaching well engineering to a greater degree, having two modules covering it, and also materials & corrosion as well.

    My friend did Oil & Gas Structural Engineering from Aberdeen University, who got a job offered from shell singapore once he graduated(2012).
    He told me, all his friends got job offered within one month.
    That's fascinating, but not really relevant to an oil & gas engineering degree.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I don't, since I didn't do an MSc.



    The differences in modules clearly shows that there is a slight difference in the courses. Aberdeen is teaching the subsurface aspect in greater detail, as they have two modules covering it, likely because they have an established geology and petroleum engineering faculty. They're also teaching some chemistry and flow assurance too, likely leveraging on their chemistry and chemical engineering departments.

    RGU is teaching well engineering to a greater degree, having two modules covering it, and also materials & corrosion as well.

    For Aberdeen's oil & gas degree,
    This programme is fully accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Energy Institute (EI)

    But, rgu's oil & gas,
    This course is accredited by the Energy Institute only.


    That's fascinating, but not really relevant to an oil & gas engineering degree.
    More or less the same, related to the oil and gas field.
    My advice is, before anyone go for a degree, please take the below factors into the considerations,
    university ranking,
    graduate prospects,
    course relevant,
    what do you want to be,
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I don't, since I didn't do an MSc.



    The differences in modules clearly shows that there is a slight difference in the courses. Aberdeen is teaching the subsurface aspect in greater detail, as they have two modules covering it, likely because they have an established geology and petroleum engineering faculty. They're also teaching some chemistry and flow assurance too, likely leveraging on their chemistry and chemical engineering departments.

    RGU is teaching well engineering to a greater degree, having two modules covering it, and also materials & corrosion as well.

    That's fascinating, but not really relevant to an oil & gas engineering degree.
    For Aberdeen's oil & gas degree,
    This programme is fully accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Energy Institute (EI)

    But, rgu's oil & gas,
    This course is accredited by the Energy Institute only.

    I am not going to give comments on this, but I am sure everyone here can see/understand the differences btw these two universities in terms of its strength and weakness.
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    (Original post by waynelaw)
    Catinahat,
    One of his friends from Aberdeen, who works in shell uk since 2009.
    To be honest, Aberdeen University is very dedicated in this field.
    I understood that. What I meant was, that his friend is probably from Singapore, and the big companies dont have problems hiring natives studying here to send them back to their base of operations in that country. Pretty much any 3 of the unis being discussed here would have landed him/her a job in that scenario (not going into the specifics - assuming oil and gas)

    (Original post by waynelaw)
    For Aberdeen's oil & gas degree,
    This programme is fully accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Energy Institute (EI)

    But, rgu's oil & gas,
    This course is accredited by the Energy Institute only.

    I am not going to give comments on this, but I am sure everyone here can see/understand the differences btw these two universities in terms of its strength and weakness.
    I think HW has more relevant accreds (unless you want to diff bet OG and PE programs)

    "The MSc Petroleum Engineering is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IMMM) and the Energy Institute (EI)."

    So I think it would be HW>UA>RGU
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    (Original post by waynelaw)
    For Aberdeen's oil & gas degree,
    This programme is fully accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Energy Institute (EI)

    But, rgu's oil & gas,
    This course is accredited by the Energy Institute only.

    I am not going to give comments on this, but I am sure everyone here can see/understand the differences btw these two universities in terms of its strength and weakness.
    That doesn't mean anything. If you're not capable of reading module titles/descriptions, or do not understand what they mean in context of the industry, there's little point in continuing this discussion.
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    (Original post by catinahat)
    Pretty much any 3 of the unis being discussed here would have landed him/her a job in that scenario (not going into the specifics - assuming oil and gas)
    I agree with this. If you're a good candidate, you'll get a job. You don't even need an oil & gas specific masters. People trying to argue about which university is going to get them a job are likely people who have never been through the interview process.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I agree with this. If you're a good candidate, you'll get a job. You don't even need an oil & gas specific masters. People trying to argue about which university is going to get them a job are likely people who have never been through the interview process.
    I agree too, a candidate must have a good performance, otherwise hard to get a job, irrelevant to the university.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    That doesn't mean anything. If you're not capable of reading module titles/descriptions, or do not understand what they mean in context of the industry, there's little point in continuing this discussion.
    WHY doesn't mean anything ??
    Accreditation by Professional Recognition, which confirms the value of the programmes, and also fulfilled the std requirements which set by the professional bodies.

    Accreditation is a process through which the IMechE/EI confirms that the programmes offered by an institution generate the necessary evidence for Fellowship to be awarded.

    For Aberdeen's oil & gas engineering, which is fully accredited by these two professional bodies.
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    (Original post by waynelaw)
    WHY doesn't mean anything ??
    Accreditation by Professional Recognition, which confirms the value of the programmes, and also fulfilled the std requirements which set by the professional bodies.

    Accreditation is a process through which the IMechE/EI confirms that the programmes offered by an institution generate the necessary evidence for Fellowship to be awarded.

    For Aberdeen's oil & gas engineering, which is fully accredited by these two professional bodies.
    Accreditation confirms that a course meets a set of requirements given by the engineering council. It has absolutely nothing to do whatsoever with the "value" of said degree; in fact you'll find that a hell of a lot of engineering MSc degrees out there are not accredited because their scope of focus is too narrow, or the university simply hasn't bothered to submit the course for accreditation.

    It's very important in the context of undergraduate courses in the traditional disciplines, but not something I would be particularly fussed about at masters level. What I'd be most concerned about is the course content: is it what you want to study? And is it relevant to what you want to become your future job? If the IMechE deems that modules on hangers and running tools are not suitable for accreditation, doesn't mean that industry doesn't think it's useful.
 
 
 
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