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Sterling Moss says women don't have the mental strength for F1 Watch

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    I always wanted to be an F1 driver...unfortunately there's no way that'll happen as never got into karting or motorsports at a young age. I'd be really happy to see a female F1 driver, but only if she merited it. Don't want positive discrimination of any kind.
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    You need to be fitter generally for F1 to stand the strain but when it goes wrong in horse riding, the word battering soon shows its true meaning.
    Are you serious?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._One_accidents
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    women F1 drivers? please...
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    if there are female fighter pilots then a female f1 champion doesn't sound outrageous
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Try getting thrown into a rock solid cross country fence followed by a 17hh horse landing on top of you.
    Im taking it, that driving the cars round a track doesnt mean a broken pelvis, broken back, broken neck, broken arms, legs etc? (Yes this did happen to my semi pro friend btw)

    You need to be fitter generally for F1 to stand the strain but when it goes wrong in horse riding, the word battering soon shows its true meaning.

    The mental demands for high level horse riding are just as hard (for competition) as the physical ones though

    You have to work out the course, striding, angles, pace, position, work your horse's mood out (because we dont have all those nice controls that dont change)

    This article is mainly about showjumping but it puts the point across well

    http://www.globalchampionstour.com/f...-in-the-drivi/


    And anyways after this, apologies for hijacking the thread.
    Hold on, you could put them on a par for the sake of not creating an argument, but suggesting that F1 driving is easy is mad. Suggesting that Horse riding is much harder, is mad also.

    In F1 those cars are travelling at speeds that boggle the mind, they're hitting up to 5Gs in some of the corners and the inertia on their bodies as they speed up to 200mph and then slam down to 60 multiple times every lap is insane. They do this for an hour and a half at a time. And they have to know the track like the back of their hand, they have to cope with over 30 independent settings in their car, and make on the fly adjustments for a whole host of things, from tyre wear, to air temperature, to the guy infront of them. They do all of this whilst travelling at inasane speeds where a miscalculation of a tenth of a second could very easily mean death. Noone is suggesting being an olympic level equestrian is easy, but don't ruin your own argument by being petty and trying to belittle F1.
    (Original post by Zerforax)
    Old people saying old crazy things? Surprised it's made into such a huge deal.

    Frankly, if you count the number of young girls who have taken up karting or other motorsports from a young age, had similar number of hours on the track and others who have now made it to F1 - I bet the numbers would be very low as a ratio to the male counterpart.

    For all this talk of aggression - frankly it's more about judgment and calculated assessments (or inflated egos frankly) than being aggressive.

    If you took 100 or 1000 men and women and gave them all the same track time, do I think on average men would do better? No, I think it would be roughly even.
    I have to disagree with your last point, the men would probably do better, better spacial awareness is innate, generally speaking obviously.
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    (Original post by James A)
    This doesn't represent the physical and mental strength that F1 drivers go through.

    (Original post by Hopple)




    A horse won that medal, not the rider.
    I was replying to a poster who wasn't commenting specifically on F! but who said

    It's no coincidence that women are much lower down in every single professional sport, physical or not.
    and was showing that this was not true.

    If you want an example of a sport that is more physically demanding it is ultra-long distance swimming where the fastest times are virtually always held by women.

    http://www.channelswimmingassociation.com/swim-results

    As to Formula 1, a woman will be competitive when one comes along with the right sponsorship package. There is no woman driver (there is a co-driver) competing in the World Rally Championship but we know that in the past Michelle Mouton competed successfully at the highest levels and in cars more powerful than those permitted today.
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Try getting thrown into a rock solid cross country fence followed by a 17hh horse landing on top of you.
    Im taking it, that driving the cars round a track doesnt mean a broken pelvis, broken back, broken neck, broken arms, legs etc? (Yes this did happen to my semi pro friend btw)

    You need to be fitter generally for F1 to stand the strain but when it goes wrong in horse riding, the word battering soon shows its true meaning.

    The mental demands for high level horse riding are just as hard (for competition) as the physical ones though

    You have to work out the course, striding, angles, pace, position, work your horse's mood out (because we dont have all those nice controls that dont change)

    This article is mainly about showjumping but it puts the point across well

    http://www.globalchampionstour.com/f...-in-the-drivi/


    And anyways after this, apologies for hijacking the thread.
    Evidentally not pro enough

    I would have to agree that although horseracing is very dangerous and demanding, F1 is far more so, both in the endurance required and the precision involved.
    As to the original thread topic, I reckon a women driver could perform to the same standard as the top F1 drivers, but they're simply not encouraged to get into it at any point in their adolescence which is why there's so few who can remotely compete.
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    Tbh there are women fighter jet pilits etc which requires higher g forces, up to 9 and similar amounts if other processes going on.




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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Try getting thrown into a rock solid cross country fence followed by a 17hh horse landing on top of you.
    Im taking it, that driving the cars round a track doesnt mean a broken pelvis, broken back, broken neck, broken arms, legs etc? (Yes this did happen to my semi pro friend btw)

    You need to be fitter generally for F1 to stand the strain but when it goes wrong in horse riding, the word battering soon shows its true meaning.

    The mental demands for high level horse riding are just as hard (for competition) as the physical ones though

    You have to work out the course, striding, angles, pace, position, work your horse's mood out (because we dont have all those nice controls that dont change)

    This article is mainly about showjumping but it puts the point across well

    http://www.globalchampionstour.com/f...-in-the-drivi/


    And anyways after this, apologies for hijacking the thread.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/moto...ne/6980337.stm

    You have no clue. Do you even realise how hard it is to concentrate when travelling at speeds of 190mph?

    Let me guess, you ride ponies/horses every now and then in some private track, like a rich girl?
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Show me the person that can stop a true bolter of a horse. I know professional male riders who have had to bale out before.

    Less people than would have the ability to drive the f1 cars basically. Mostly anyone who got their fitness to a really decent level and did some training can drive those cars.

    Takes far far more skill to do what the olympic equestrians do.
    This is just :facepalm:

    More people know how to ride a race horse than drive a F1 car, fact.

    As for them needing more 'skill', I presume you speak on comparative terms based on the experience of having done both? You've driven an F1 car yeah? :rolleyes:
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    Tell that to this woman:

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    (Original post by Hopple)
    It's true that fewer girls go into sport, and this reduces the pool from which talent can arise, as well as reduced competition for that talent to be honed against. We all know at least a few reasons why girls tend to back away from sport, but I don't think we can say one way or another if there's a mental strength issue, and if there is, whether it's innate or created by society.




    A horse won that medal, not the rider.
    What nonsense.

    Neg me all you like, that's just like saying it's the car that wins the race not the driver.
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    I've no idea if there will ever be a female F1 driver or not. However if there is not it will not be because women are mentally weak because they are not.
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    I'm fairly sure if a woman can make it into The Red Arrows one can make it into F1, even thought it's hardly a common occurrence.
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    I find it really amusing how about 5 people have rightly pointed out that we have female fighter pilots, a much more dangerous and thus physically and mentally challenging job, and no one agreeing with the title have even acknowledged what they've said.

    Yes we are a sexually dimorphic species and there may be a high proportion of men able to physically meet the demands of F1 driving. That does not mean all women are incapable of meeting the physical demands and has no bearing whatsoever on their mental faculties. To write off one gender from being able to do something (not directly related to reproduction) because they have two X chromosomes is retarded.
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    I find it really amusing how about 5 people have rightly pointed out that we have female fighter pilots, a much more dangerous and thus physically and mentally challenging job, and no one agreeing with the title have even acknowledged what they've said.

    Yes we are a sexually dimorphic species and there may be a high proportion of men able to physically meet the demands of F1 driving. That does not mean all women are incapable of meeting the physical demands and has no bearing whatsoever on their mental faculties. To write off one gender from being able to do something (not directly related to reproduction) because they have two X chromosomes is retarded.
    The argument is not whether woman can drive a F1 car or not. The argument is whether women can drive as competitively as men.

    Women can drive F1 cars, no problem, much like how they can fly fighter jets, kick a ball, hit a tennis ball, run the 100m etc. But they don't necessarily compete together in all of those examples, do they?

    The question being asked here is synonymous to asking something like whether Serena Williams can play in the men's draw...except the grey area comes with not actually knowing how much of a limitation physical/'mental' capabilities are in F1.

    What do you know about how female fighter pilots compare to male fighter pilots? Does a credible comparison exist? For example what if I were to ask which of the two genders in the Red Arrows can best sustain complex aerobatics maneuvers for 2 hours straight? I don't know the answer to this, but the point is it is not as straight forward as you make out.
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    (Original post by kunoichi)
    Try getting thrown into a rock solid cross country fence followed by a 17hh horse landing on top of you.
    Sounds awful!

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    The people saying "one woman will someday" is a bit of a red herring.

    There have been five female f1 drivers in the past (wiki), which shows, at least to some extent, that some women do have the skills (just as some men have the skills). The fact that men far outnumber women in the top rankings cannot be ignored, so we should ask why this is the case. The two options I can see:

    1. There are not enough opportunities given to women to allow them to enter f1.

    2. A lower proportion of women than men have the skills to race at the highest level.

    I hope the first point isn't the case. It does seem like there are plenty of opportunities, although it also seems that most of the commercial funding goes towards men's sport. However, perhaps this is justified if men compete at a higher level, which is however a feedback loop.

    I don't know, physiologically, if there is evidence to support the second point.
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    (Original post by pjm600)
    The people saying "one woman will someday" is a bit of a red herring.

    There have been five female f1 drivers in the past (wiki), which shows, at least to some extent, that some women do have the skills (just as some men have the skills). The fact that men far outnumber women in the top rankings cannot be ignored, so we should ask why this is the case. The two options I can see:

    1. There are not enough opportunities given to women to allow them to enter f1.

    2. A lower proportion of women than men have the skills to race at the highest level.

    I hope the first point isn't the case. It does seem like there are plenty of opportunities, although it also seems that most of the commercial funding goes towards men's sport. However, perhaps this is justified if men compete at a higher level, which is however a feedback loop.

    I don't know, physiologically, if there is evidence to support the second point.
    There's also the number of women who are interested enough in F1 to want to compete which needs to be taken into account I think. Guys are generally more into cars and such than women are.
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    I don't agree with Moss's comments but I do think people are making a big thing about his attitudes lately. He is an 83 year old man with attitudes from a different era.

    Not long ago the press made massive deal about his comments on not wanting in his words a 'poofter' to play him in a film. In the same interview he also said "I think it would be difficult for someone of the other persuasion, who is homosexual, to take on the part, as I have spent my life driving cars and chasing girls". Although I don't necessarily agree with him I can see his point of view it would be quite hypocritical.

    Stirling Moss is one of my child hood heroes and have met him on a few occasions. People need to remember he's from a different era and I could be wrong but I think interviewers have been very manipulative in there questions.

    On the topic of women F1 drivers I think it is just a matter of time until a woman makes it into F1. There have been some outstanding women drivers in other motorsport especially rally, Michèle Mouton springs to mind and even Stirling Moss's sister Pat Moss.
 
 
 
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