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    (Original post by heart/)
    english, and then international school (smlr to american)
    I have absolutely no idea what you mean by that
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    Durham is solidly upper middle class so the most widespread accent will be RP or Estuary. Since it's one of the more prestigious universities in the country, people who have benefited from a pro-learning middle-class environment and/or have had their confidence and knowledge of the system inculcated at private school are the ones to get in. The RP accent is native to the Home Counties but since rich people are always more mobile RP is widespread in middle-class areas certainly throughout the south, that is to say, below a line from the Severn to the Wash, and possibly in the richer areas of the north such as Cheshire and Yorkshire.

    The parallel spread of Estuary where RP traditionally trod represents the increase in social mobility since WW2.

    On our island we have to deal with accents like Geordie - in light of that I think your Kiwi accent will be eminently comprehensible
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    So essentially, as long as I learn the particularly unique elements of the dialect such as the vocabulary, I will be alright? Also, I guess it goes both ways as I will have to stop saying jandals, chilly bin, crib/bach, duvet etc. For those interested, jandals are flip-flops or slippers; chilly bin is a portable cooler where you keep beers; a crib or bach is a modest 2nd home; and a duvet is a quilt.
    There's nothing really to learn....and no need to get rid of your vocab either. Pick it up as you go along. And people will be more likely to find your different vocabulary more interesting than anything.

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    (Original post by Sheldor)
    There's nothing really to learn....and no need to get rid of your vocab either. Pick it up as you go along. And people will be more likely to find your different vocabulary more interesting than anything.

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    You reckon? Good to know, and thanks all for the replies. If anyone else has anything to add to this discussion, you are very welcome to do so.
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    You reckon? Good to know, and thanks all for the replies. If anyone else has anything to add to this discussion, you are very welcome to do so.
    Yup - you'll get some good natured teasing probably but nothing that's intended to offend
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    So essentially, as long as I learn the particularly unique elements of the dialect such as the vocabulary, I will be alright? Also, I guess it goes both ways as I will have to stop saying jandals, chilly bin, crib/bach, duvet etc. For those interested, jandals are flip-flops or slippers; chilly bin is a portable cooler where you keep beers; a crib or bach is a modest 2nd home; and a duvet is a quilt.
    Over here, "crib" is a 'gangsta' term for "home", that you'll probably never hear someone say unironically. I say duvet rather than quilt, though - I think most people are happy with "duvet"?

    I like the idea of this turning into a "British slang" thread. :P

    (Original post by Sheldor)
    There's nothing really to learn....and no need to get rid of your vocab either. Pick it up as you go along. And people will be more likely to find your different vocabulary more interesting than anything.

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    True, just important to understand why people stare at you when you say something you think is perfectly innocuous. XD
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    I have absolutely no idea what you mean by that
    Its a type of school, usually an american or english system. Students who went to them end up having an almost-american accent. you will see when you get to uni. also, im sure people will like your accent. they might not understand you initially for some words, but why are you worried?
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    You reckon? Good to know, and thanks all for the replies. If anyone else has anything to add to this discussion, you are very welcome to do so.
    yep! Could have some teasing and hilarious misunderstandings, but it would just be more entertaining.

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    I study at Durham and have a geordie accent-put it this way, I felt like a complete fish out of water and people were fascinated by me. You get used to it though.
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    Britain has such a crazy cocktail of accents (both from local dialects and immigration), I hardly doubt you'll stand out too much.

    Don't feel the need to get rid of your idiolect, either! If you wanna say crazy words we've never heard of, we'll probably just welcome it as quirky! (See: Arguments about scones, teacakes/barms/etc., Northerners vs. Southerners etc... It's all in good fun.)

    I'd warn you though that plenty of people are going to mistake you for an Australian... (I did this last year and a Kiwi got really annoyed at me, whoops ).
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    (Original post by dionysos4)
    So essentially, as long as I learn the particularly unique elements of the dialect such as the vocabulary, I will be alright? Also, I guess it goes both ways as I will have to stop saying jandals, chilly bin, crib/bach, duvet etc. For those interested, jandals are flip-flops or slippers; chilly bin is a portable cooler where you keep beers; a crib or bach is a modest 2nd home; and a duvet is a quilt.
    Hey

    We say 'duvet' and we know crib. Sometimes used in a jokey manner like 'welcome to ma criiiiib'.

    I'm Welsh and have quite a thick valley accent. I'm going to my local uni and was so embarrassed to speak on the open day as I was the only Welsh one there! They was a wide variety of English accents going on, and then when i spoke the group was like 'amygaaaaad say that again!" So if it helps at all, people are coming to my uni from only 2/3 hours away and I'll probably struggle with their accents for a while!
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    I have bath not a barth and I cut the grass and not grarss, I survived year 1.... The tutors even understood my essays despite the above impediment.


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