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    Like the above poster says, it's a requirement to have a C grade. Getting a D won't make your application look any better, they simply won't look at it at all because it hasn't got that magic C grade on it.

    You can moan all day about how the QTS tests are unfair, how you won't ever possibly find a use for maths in your subject, but the fact is you are going to be faced with numerical problems to solve in your career and the tests are a fair standard to make sure that everyone's on the same standardised level when starting training.

    Personally, I would've focused on the maths GCSE in your AS year, as you would've also had another extra year (A2) to try again if you fail. Get a head start on it now and start revising for next year, build up every bit of knowledge you can. Look at mock exam papers online, ask people for help that you know are good at maths.

    Once you've got past the hurdle of GCSE maths, then it's on to the next hurdle of your QTS tests. The only thing to do for this is to practise, practise, practise! I was like you too - I was getting 4/28 on the first practice tests I was taking. You just have to keep going back to the tests, work out what keeps cropping up (i.e percentage/decimal/fraction conversions etc) and work on your speedy methods for those. If you're doing this alongside your GCSE though, it might come quicker to you as you'll be learning maths anyway at the same time. Take it back to basic level if you have to. I was referring back to a SATS maths revision book when I started looking at the QTS tests.

    If you're going to be teaching Secondary, I assume you'll be doing a PGCE...in which case, don't worry about the QTS tests for another 3 years until you've got your English degree first! Just concentrate on your GCSE!

    Good luck with next year.
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    I agree with everyone else that by thinking it's impossible for you to get a C, you are holding yourself back even if you don't realise it. I was the same at the beginning of year ten, I couldn't get better than a B grade in maths (which I know is still good but my target was an A*) and I thought it was ridiculous that everyone was expecting me to get an A*, because I honestly thought it was impossible, like you think it's impossible to get a C. But after a while I realised that thinking I couldn't do it was getting me nowhere, so I worked hard, got my teacher to explain some things to me, then I took my GCSE early in February and got an A* (11 marks over the boundary). Nothing is ever impossible.
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    (Original post by AbathaZoe)
    I agree with everyone else that by thinking it's impossible for you to get a C, you are holding yourself back even if you don't realise it. I was the same at the beginning of year ten, I couldn't get better than a B grade in maths (which I know is still good but my target was an A*) and I thought it was ridiculous that everyone was expecting me to get an A*, because I honestly thought it was impossible, like you think it's impossible to get a C. But after a while I realised that thinking I couldn't do it was getting me nowhere, so I worked hard, got my teacher to explain some things to me, then I took my GCSE early in February and got an A* (11 marks over the boundary). Nothing is ever impossible.
    Do you think maybe because you were already at a higher level of understanding, it was easier for you to get that A* overall?

    I mean it wouldn't make a difference because it's in the same grade boundaries i.e A*-C so it really wouldn't matter. But my point is, would it be easier for you because you already understand the basics of maths, whereas I forget maths so quickly, which makes it harder because it cannot stick in my head!
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    1. GCSEs become pretty much deprecated once you get a degree
    2. You could probably get the E to a C in a week or two if you really tried. As in work at it, watch math youtube tutorials etc...

    Source: myself
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    (Original post by aranexus)
    1. GCSEs become pretty much deprecated once you get a degree
    2. You could probably get the E to a C in a week or two if you really tried. As in work at it, watch math youtube tutorials etc...

    Source: myself
    This thread proves that GCSEs DO matter even if you have a degree.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    This thread proves that GCSEs DO matter even if you have a degree.
    Actually, threads prove very little...

    & in all of my interviews: I've never once been asked for/about GCSEs, as they'd been superseded by my degree's.
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    (Original post by aranexus)
    Actually, threads prove very little...

    & in all of my interviews: I've never once been asked for/about GCSEs, as they'd been superseded by my degree's.
    This obviously isn't the case with teaching though. I agree that in a lot of interviews for jobs I have never been asked for a Maths GCSE but there is no chance of getting that past any PGCE institution. Plus, a GCSE grade C is the standard for a lot of professions.
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    (Original post by Mikey)
    This obviously isn't the case with teaching though. I agree that in a lot of interviews for jobs I have never been asked for a Maths GCSE but there is no chance of getting that past any PGCE institution. Plus, a GCSE grade C is the standard for a lot of professions.
    I agree, they matter under certain circumstances.
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    (Original post by aranexus)
    Actually, threads prove very little...

    & in all of my interviews: I've never once been asked for/about GCSEs, as they'd been superseded by my degree's.
    My point was that THIS thread demonstrated that GCSEs are important. This is in the Education & Teaching forum... and you need certain GCSE grades to be able to teach.
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    Never say never, if you work hard for a grade C, be confident that you'll get it! it just means working / studying harder! Good luck
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    (Original post by Cool_JordH)
    I'm not saying it is unfair as a whole. But I'm saying it is unfair that from July 2013, they are making the tests harder which is unfair to students who struggle at Maths. Now the problem you seem to be not getting is the fact that I have NEVER been good at Maths, like NEVER and I know this and have realised this too. What makes it seem possible to achieve a grade C maths in within one year, when my I moved into my transition from KS3 to KS4 at a level 3a/4c.. And this was at the end of year 9, moving into year 10...

    To get a C within one year, when i tried to get a D in two.. That does not seem logically possible to me if I'm honest.
    GCSE Maths doesn't really require you to be a Euler-esque mathematician, if you practice enough you will get better at it, if your just gonna say that your no good and make yourself believe that you wont pass.
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    Might be harsh but...as a teacher, a whole load of your pupils will dislike English, think they're rubbish at English, have no motivation in English. If you have just written off a subject from an early stage as 'too hard' or 'not for you', then you'll be hypocritical to expect anything from your pupils who struggle with English.
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    I can't believe there is anybody who can't get a C in GCSE maths IF they're taught properly.
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    (Original post by paddyman4)
    Might be harsh but...as a teacher, a whole load of your pupils will dislike English, think they're rubbish at English, have no motivation in English. If you have just written off a subject from an early stage as 'too hard' or 'not for you', then you'll be hypocritical to expect anything from your pupils who struggle with English.
    QFT.

    It implies that you think teaching is a redundant career to go into if good teaching can't make a difference.
 
 
 
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