Why do Internation Students have such a Reputation? Watch

Ivanka
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#21
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#21
I'm an international student as well. I don't think that all internationals are antisocial, but some may face problems because of their lack of English proficiency, cultural misunderstandings, etc.

Personally, I try to be friendly towards everyone, but, for some odd reason, I have mostly made friends from non-British backgrounds at uni, I only have like one british friend. One of my classmates who I got on really well with seemed to be British, but I only found out at the end of the academic year that she had an Irish passport! :teehee:
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Origami Bullets
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(Original post by Ivanka)
Personally, I try to be friendly towards everyone, but, for some odd reason, I have mostly made friends from non-British backgrounds at uni, I only have like one british friend. One of my classmates who I got on really well with seemed to be British, but I only found out at the end of the academic year that she had an Irish passport! :teehee:
Pfft it's close enough! Ireland is part of the British Isles and it was all one country until 1921, and it shares a similar culture.
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Abblecrumble
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#23
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I will make it my mission to include international students! Makes me feel quite sad to think that they would feel isolated because we've got a different culture and lifestyle.
What don't some people like about British culture? Not all of us are mad drinking party animals (if that is what puts some people off). :confused:
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zaback21
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(Original post by Abblecrumble)
I will make it my mission to include international students! Makes me feel quite sad to think that they would feel isolated because we've got a different culture and lifestyle.
What don't some people like about British culture? Not all of us are mad drinking party animals (if that is what puts some people off). :confused:
Hi Abblecrumble, Thanks for your effort though. Well the difficulty in mixing with local mostly stems from drinking. if you wanna hang out go to pub with your uni mates or get left behind. Drinking is like a bonding thing for local guys. I hope people also find some other means to hang out.
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Abblecrumble
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#25
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#25
(Original post by zaback21)
Hi Abblecrumble, Thanks for your effort though. Well the difficulty in mixing with local mostly stems from drinking. if you wanna hang out go to pub with your uni mates or get left behind. Drinking is like a bonding thing for local guys. I hope people also find some other means to hang out.
I do! I think the pub is a nice place to socialise, but I'm not really big on clubbing. Sometimes I just prefer to stay in and watch a good film of have a good chat over coffee and cakes.
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zaback21
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(Original post by Abblecrumble)
I do! I think the pub is a nice place to socialise, but I'm not really big on clubbing. Sometimes I just prefer to stay in and watch a good film of have a good chat over coffee and cakes.
I know. What happened to the good old ways of socializing. Why can't we watch a great movie, listen to great music, have a discussion about something or hang out. I feel like I belong to the 50s lol.
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desdemonata
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I could be considered an international student (though SFE considers me to be a home student) because I moved from abroad to go to uni. In my flat were two Cypriot twins who never talked to us. They actually used to leave notes on the kitchen table to complain about things rather than talk to us, which I personally just found unbearably rude. Their English was fine, one of them was actually studying English and the other Biochemistry. To get into uni you have to take an English test anyway, so it's actually hard to be bad at English and still manage to take a test (including conversational/oral skills) and do well enough.

They didn't stay in their rooms all the time (when they did it you could tell because they had rooms next to each other and would often speak loudly/shout rather than go into the other person's room, and I was opposite them in the corridor), they often brought people back if they were home or went to their places... all of their friends were Greek.

Seems kind of sad to me to come here and not interact with anybody but those you could speak to at home. Though this is obviously anecdotal and doesn't mean anything, from what I've seen, it's an unfortunately accurate stereotype. It's also really difficult to just go over and start speaking to an international student when they're speaking in their native language with a group of people from their country :sad: It's hard enough to just walk over to a group that seem to already know each other and introduce yourself, let alone when talking to them would mean that they had to speak in your language rather than their own.

That said, keeping an open mind is the best policy. I wouldn't want to have it in my head that all International students are like this, espeically seeing as personally I'd find it really interesting to speak to people from other places and would like to have more International friends.
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pmc:producer
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#28
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The language barrier can definitely be one thing that proves to be a barrier to forming relationships. As can different cultures and values. As long as both home and international student is happy and has the option to socialize with other people when they want, there's no harm in this.
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zaback21
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#29
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(Original post by desdemonata)
I could be considered an international student (though SFE considers me to be a home student) because I moved from abroad to go to uni. In my flat were two Cypriot twins who never talked to us. They actually used to leave notes on the kitchen table to complain about things rather than talk to us, which I personally just found unbearably rude. Their English was fine, one of them was actually studying English and the other Biochemistry. To get into uni you have to take an English test anyway, so it's actually hard to be bad at English and still manage to take a test (including conversational/oral skills) and do well enough.

They didn't stay in their rooms all the time (when they did it you could tell because they had rooms next to each other and would often speak loudly/shout rather than go into the other person's room, and I was opposite them in the corridor), they often brought people back if they were home or went to their places... all of their friends were Greek.

Seems kind of sad to me to come here and not interact with anybody but those you could speak to at home. Though this is obviously anecdotal and doesn't mean anything, from what I've seen, it's an unfortunately accurate stereotype. It's also really difficult to just go over and start speaking to an international student when they're speaking in their native language with a group of people from their country :sad: It's hard enough to just walk over to a group that seem to already know each other and introduce yourself, let alone when talking to them would mean that they had to speak in your language rather than their own.

That said, keeping an open mind is the best policy. I wouldn't want to have it in my head that all International students are like this, espeically seeing as personally I'd find it really interesting to speak to people from other places and would like to have more International friends.
You just explained the same experience I had before. Lets hope my new uni friends(starting this Sept) arent like them .
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desdemonata
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(Original post by zaback21)
You just explained the same experience I had before. Lets hope my new uni friends(starting this Sept) arent like them .
I think it was exacerbated by the fact they were twins, and they must have had to specifically ask for rooms right next to each other in the same flat as they are normally randomly allocated. They definitely mainly stuck together, and only had that small group of Greek friends. It wuold have been OK if they just weren't so rude - they were pretty bad flatmates and complained to us about us without seeing the hypocrisy, especially when they did the exact same things we did!

But yeah, I think you'll find bad flatmates in any group. Some of the worst flatmates are those that just treat shared living spaces like their second bedroom - AKA try to turn it into a tip and leave their stuff lying around. Or those that steal food! I don't think international students do these things, so yeah
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zaback21
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(Original post by desdemonata)
I think it was exacerbated by the fact they were twins, and they must have had to specifically ask for rooms right next to each other in the same flat as they are normally randomly allocated. They definitely mainly stuck together, and only had that small group of Greek friends. It wuold have been OK if they just weren't so rude - they were pretty bad flatmates and complained to us about us without seeing the hypocrisy, especially when they did the exact same things we did!

But yeah, I think you'll find bad flatmates in any group. Some of the worst flatmates are those that just treat shared living spaces like their second bedroom - AKA try to turn it into a tip and leave their stuff lying around. Or those that steal food! I don't think international students do these things, so yeah
Ok so you lived with them in uni accommodation ? Then perhaps you can help me decide if I should move into residence hall of 65 people or a nice house of 6. Pros and cons.
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desdemonata
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(Original post by zaback21)
Ok so you lived with them in uni accommodation ? Then perhaps you can help me decide if I should move into residence hall of 65 people or a nice house of 6. Pros and cons.
Yes, I go to a campus university, so first year firmers were guaranteed accommodation on campus We were in a flat of 8.

I'd be more than happy to, but rather than derail this thread, maybe make a new one, and I can reply there? Better to get opinions of just one person, anyway
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Abblecrumble
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#33
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#33
(Original post by desdemonata)
I think it was exacerbated by the fact they were twins, and they must have had to specifically ask for rooms right next to each other in the same flat as they are normally randomly allocated. They definitely mainly stuck together, and only had that small group of Greek friends. It wuold have been OK if they just weren't so rude - they were pretty bad flatmates and complained to us about us without seeing the hypocrisy, especially when they did the exact same things we did!

But yeah, I think you'll find bad flatmates in any group. Some of the worst flatmates are those that just treat shared living spaces like their second bedroom - AKA try to turn it into a tip and leave their stuff lying around. Or those that steal food! I don't think international students do these things, so yeah
I'm a twin going to the same university as my twin, but we have made a pledge to not make a big deal about it and try to not bring it up (hopefully we'll be in different accommodation so no one needs to know). I'd hate for people to think that I didn't want to interact with anyone else but my twin! I can have plenty of time to talk to her if I want. A lot of university is about being independent.


(Original post by zaback21)
I know. What happened to the good old ways of socializing. Why can't we watch a great movie, listen to great music, have a discussion about something or hang out. I feel like I belong to the 50s lol.
Well I'm glad there are plenty of others who like the simple things in life. Haha. I'm too laid back and relaxed to party.
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zaback21
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(Original post by Abblecrumble)
Well I'm glad there are plenty of others who like the simple things in life. Haha. I'm too laid back and relaxed to party.
Thats cool :cool: !!! I will try when I start uni this time to find like minded people like me.
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desdemonata
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(Original post by Abblecrumble)
I'm a twin going to the same university as my twin, but we have made a pledge to not make a big deal about it and try to not bring it up (hopefully we'll be in different accommodation so no one needs to know). I'd hate for people to think that I didn't want to interact with anyone else but my twin! I can have plenty of time to talk to her if I want. A lot of university is about being independent.
I agree :yep:

Well they were identical twins, so it was hard not to know but yes, they stuck with each other too much in my opinion. I mean, I love my siblings, but I wouldn't want to just be with them all the time, just like I love my best friend but wouldn't want to just be with her all the time.

I also think having a twin would be reassuring to fall back on, and that in turn would allow you to go out and try and meet as many people as possible. Just sticking with your twin would make you miss out on a lot!
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jelly1000
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We tried saying hi to an international student one day when we were just talking in the kitchen and she came in but she ran away from us. We thought that was pretty rude. You might be shy but surely you can't be surprised when someone tries to say hi to you in halls.
And the other international student in my flat admitted to us his English wasn't very good.
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zaback21
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(Original post by jelly1000)
We tried saying hi to an international student one day when we were just talking in the kitchen and she came in but she ran away from us. We thought that was pretty rude. You might be shy but surely you can't be surprised when someone tries to say hi to you in halls.
And the other international student in my flat admitted to us his English wasn't very good.
How come someone who doesnt even have good English to say hi get into university ? I think unis should stop their business with English foundation courses. Its just a money making scheme for unis taking advantages from those who doesnt have satisfactory IELTS score. If you can't get satisfactory IELTS score, then perhaps you should improve before joining uni.

I don't believe 6-12 months of uni English foundation course at 5000+ pounds is guaranteed to improve your English when IELTS costs 250 pounds max. Lets face it, anybody who pays 5000+ pounds knowingly that the same certificate can be achieved from 250 pound IELTS exam pretty much knows their English won't improve in 6-12 months and hence if they can get into uni by (bribing) 5000 pounds to uni, why not ? And why would unis miss out on such money. UK and other countries should stop unis from offering foundation English course and NO IELTS NO VISA pretty much.
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Abblecrumble
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#38
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How do these students with poor English understand lectures or write essays? I hear that international students get good grades so they must have good English. :confused:
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zaback21
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(Original post by Abblecrumble)
How do these students with poor English understand lectures or write essays? I hear that international students get good grades so they must have good English. :confused:
Well they do. I am one such international students But there are some who are not so good. One have to understand most people may be able to write or read good English but will struggle in a conversation. In reading and writing you have plenty of time to make up the sentence. In speaking, its instant.

You will understand if you perhaps studied a foreign language lets says French or Spanish. Writing you can easily pass but speaking takes time, attitude, practice and confidence.
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clareyyyyyyy
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#40
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there's loads of international students on my course and i'm pretty sure all of them are lovely! i know quite a few pretty well but there are several with very poor english, but it noticeably improved over the year
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