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What Nationality Am I? watch

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    Born in England to Irish parents. Lived there till I was 14.

    Moved to Northern Ireland. Have lived here since and I'm nearly 27. Still speak with an English accent.

    I personally don't consider myself either.

    In England I was an Irish *******. Here in Northern Ireland, I have been called an English *******, Irish *******, fenian, taig, orange *******, or hun. Depending on whether you want to take a shot at my heritage or indeed my accent.

    I hold 3 passports, British, Irish and Canadian (father was born in Canada).
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    (Original post by hungryatafuneral)
    I've found the relevant information in a 1981 act but not an '83 act

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/61/section/1

    I did find an '83 act but it concerned the Falklands (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1983/6)

    You've got me questioning myself now! I think I must be a British citizen because I was born here, managed to register with school/hospital etc and I have a national insurance number.

    I don't have a British passport and nor have I ever tried to apply for one though
    Yes, I meant 1981, sorry. I am typing this on a phone and its a PITA.

    You can register with a school/hospital if you are resident in the UK, same with NI number, has nothing to do with your nationality.

    I will check with the Passport Office tomorrow as I have a personal interest in this.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    Yes, I meant 1981, sorry. I am typing this on a phone and its a PITA.

    You can register with a school/hospital if you are resident in the UK, same with NI number, has nothing to do with your nationality.

    I will check with the Passport Office tomorrow as I have a personal interest in this.
    That's okay, and research away and let me know if I can help. I thought you were just being argumentative, sorry about that.

    I've learnt a lot myself tonight!

    And the British or Irish passport office? Is it citizenship or passport eligibility you want to know about?
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    (Original post by hungryatafuneral)
    That's okay, and research away and let me know if I can help. I thought you were just being argumentative, sorry about that.

    I've learnt a lot myself tonight!

    And the British or Irish passport office? Is it citizenship or passport eligibility you want to know about?
    British Passport Office of course, citizenship and passport eligibility are one and the same thing. The question is about British passport eligibility, as I already said.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    British Passport Office of course, citizenship and passport eligibility are one and the same thing. The question is about British passport eligibility, as I already said.
    Ah, of course, sorry.

    I suppose you're looking for this then https://www.gov.uk/british-passport-eligibility
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    (Original post by hungryatafuneral)
    Ah, of course, sorry.

    I suppose you're looking for this then https://www.gov.uk/british-passport-eligibility
    Does that answer the question as to whether or not you are a British national then? I have checked there and it didn't answer the question as to whether the person I was speaking about earlier was a British national or not. It just said 'it's complicated', which was very useful, and necessitated a trip to the Passport Office, whereupon they were told 'no'.

    I notice it does say

    If you were born before July 2006, your father’s British nationality will pass to you only if he was married to your mother at any time.
    which was the point I made in an earlier post.

    The Passport Office appears not to have a leg to stand on though, because UKBA says :

    If you were born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983 but before 2 October 2000, you are a British citizen if, at the time of your birth, either of your parents was an EEA citizen who was exercising Treaty rights under European Community (EC) law. This is because your parent's stay is regarded as having been free of a time limit under immigration laws.
    So your EEA father can get you British nationality if he lives in the UK, but your British father living in the UK can't unless he is married to your (non British) mother? Bizarre.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    Does that answer the question as to whether or not you are a British national then? I have checked there and it didn't answer the question as to whether the person I was speaking about earlier was a British national or not. It just said 'it's complicated', which was very useful, and necessitated a trip to the Passport Office, whereupon they were told 'no'.

    I notice it does say



    which was the point I made in an earlier post.
    Yeah, since reading that page it isn't as clear but I assume that page's information is from the British Nationality Act 1981 in which case I am a British national (born in the country to parents who were "settled", it even named Irish nationals - I checked with my mum and there was six years between them moving over and my birth)

    Does
    "If you were born before July 2006, your father’s British nationality will pass to you only if he was married to your mother at any time."
    not just refer to one method of gaining citizenship? The act refers to four (birth/adoption, descent, registration and naturalisation) in which case my British National status is safe as it was gained by birth, not descent.
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    (Original post by hungryatafuneral)
    Yeah, since reading that page it isn't as clear but I assume that page's information is from the British Nationality Act 1981 in which case I am a British national (born in the country to parents who were "settled", it even named Irish nationals - I checked with my mum and there was six years between them moving over and my birth)

    Does not just refer to one method of gaining citizenship? The act refers to four (birth/adoption, descent, registration and naturalisation) in which case my British National status is safe as it was gained by birth, not descent.
    No, there are many ways of gaining it. You will only obtain it by birth by fulfilling certain conditions, same as for all of the other methods.

    As you are aware, simply being born here is not sufficient to get it by birth. I agree it is likely that you will have gotten it by birth although there is much contradictory information.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    That's likely to be wrong, as I happen to know someone in the same situation as you who went to the Passport Office and was told they were not entitled to a British passport. Although the Passport Office could be wrong..

    The relevant nationality law is the British Nationality Act 1983. Do you have a non-Wikipedia source?
    Are they Irish though? I can't remember the details, but I know that different rules apply to Irish people compared even to people from other EEA countries. I'd have thought that someone born in the UK to Irish parents would be entitled to British citizenship (or maybe even have it by default). If the OP's parents renounced his British citizenship, then that obviously means he would have had it by default otherwise.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Are they Irish though? I can't remember the details, but I know that different rules apply to Irish people compared even to people from other EEA countries. I'd have thought that someone born in the UK to Irish parents would be entitled to British citizenship (or maybe even have it by default). If the OP's parents renounced his British citizenship, then that obviously means he would have had it by default otherwise.
    As it happens they are Irish. I would have expected the Passport Office to be the authority on matters such as this though.
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    Interesting issue.

    You'd presumably acquire British citizenship by descent

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British..._law#From_1983

    I'm a British-Australian dual citizen; my Mum was born here to a British father and Australian mother, who met in Australia when my grandfather was in the Royal Navy submarine service in the 50s. They moved to Britain and then back to Australia, and my parents (my Dad was born in Australia) lived here for a little while when they were in their 20s.

    Incidentally, my maternal grandfather was born in Portugal to a British father and Portuguese mother, and my aunt was born in Nova Scotia when my grandfather was stationed in Canada.

    I definitely feel Australian, though I would also classify myself as a Londoner and I do feel vaguely British as well (though not English). Nationality in terms of your self-image can be complex, though legally it's usually fairly simple; you should be entitled to obtain a British passport through citizenship by descent. In fact, that might be wise just in case the EU referendum in 2017 goes to the noes.
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    You are in the north? Whereabouts?
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    As it happens they are Irish. I would have expected the Passport Office to be the authority on matters such as this though.
    I found this on Wikipedia

    "From 1 January 1983 an additional requirement was put in place that one parent should be a British citizen or 'settled' in the United Kingdom. Irish citizens are automatically deemed by British law to be "settled" in the United Kingdom."

    Although I don't suppose Wikipedia counts as a more authoritative source than the Passport Office

    It's partly backed up by this though

    "If one of your parents was a British citizen or settled in the United Kingdom at the time of your birth, you will automatically be a British citizen and do not need to apply for registration. You should read the page on British citizens for more information."
    http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/br...tion/borninuk/

    So if it's true that Irish people automatically count as "settled" then they would be British citizens.
 
 
 
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