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    A level maths - C1 - 100 UMS, C2 - 100 UMS, C3 - 97 UMS..... C4 - 78 UMS. Gutted
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    You make what can out of life regardless of grades. I have friends who got great A-level grades and friends that didn't - the ones who are now doing well for themselves are the ones who work hard and keep going regardless of set backs, not necessarily the ones who were the most academic.

    This is not the most popular thing to say on TSR, but academics can only get you so far in life. Most of adult life is about networking, being willing to go out of your comfort zone and a lot of luck. You can't control everything, life isn't like being stuck to some train tracks - things happen that are unexpected, lots of things go wrong. In fact most of the things that have happened to me - I never expected (both good and bad). At 17/18 this is what you're starting to experience - especially if you're one of the one's that got unexpectedly low grades.

    This might sound crazy, but it will probably benefit you - a lot of people have good things happen to them all their lives and never really experience set backs until they get into adult life and when bad things happen they don't know how to deal with it because they've never had to deal with failure or the feeling of under performing. If you've ever failed at something and you have an ambitious character you know that it spurs you on to try harder or to find another way of succeeding - so if you didn't get the grades you wanted then take it on the chin and figure out what your plan of action is.

    It's all about how you deal with it and learning to accept that you can't control everything - you've just got to keep going and keep trying. This is just the beginning, believe me. Life is full of ups and downs and challenges - getting the ''wrong'' exam results won't ruin your life. I read a funny but true quote the other day, it was something along the lines of ''when something unexpected happens in my life I shout PLOT TWIST and move on''. That's exactly what you ought to do - deal with it, remain positive but most of all move on, move forward. What gets me is the people who either get seriously down about 'bad' grades as if it has ruined their life, or at the opposite end of the spectrum, people who get incredibly happy over their results as if it has completed their life. You shouldn't be placing your happiness or self worth on your GCSEs/A-Levels/Degree - none of them will guarantee you the life you want. None of them will guarantee you a job. None of them will guarantee you anything. They are just stepping stones to where you're trying to get to - if you 'mess them up' - find another path! Simple. They are not the be all and end all.

    I get that it's a big deal to you right now - just don't freak out. You'll wonder what you were ever stressing over in a few years - you could easily spend your whole life stressing out over things: GCSEs, A-levels, Uni, Jobs, Taxes, Rent, Bills, the rain - the bloody position of the moon - whatever! But after a while you suddenly realize that it won't make a blind bit of difference how much you over analyse things and worry - only action will change things. So revise, resit, reapply, re-assess you goals - do whatever. Just do something and move on, no big deal.

    Anyway, I'm done with imparting my wisdom on the youth. Go forth and get trollied celebrating or drowning your sorrows!
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    I know that feel
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    You make what can out of life regardless of grades. I have friends who got great A-level grades and friends that didn't - the ones who are now doing well for themselves are the ones who work hard and keep going regardless of set backs, not necessarily the ones who were the most academic.

    This is not the most popular thing to say on TSR, but academics can only get you so far in life. Most of adult life is about networking, being willing to go out of your comfort zone and a lot of luck. You can't control everything, life isn't like being stuck to some train tracks - things happen that are unexpected, lots of things go wrong. In fact most of the things that have happened to me - I never expected (both good and bad). At 17/18 this is what you're starting to experience - especially if you're one of the one's that got unexpectedly low grades.

    This might sound crazy, but it will probably benefit you - a lot of people have good things happen to them all their lives and never really experience set backs until they get into adult life and when bad things happen they don't know how to deal with it because they've never had to deal with failure or the feeling of under performing. If you've ever failed at something and you have an ambitious character you know that it spurs you on to try harder or to find another way of succeeding - so if you didn't get the grades you wanted then take it on the chin and figure out what your plan of action is.

    It's all about how you deal with it and learning to accept that you can't control everything - you've just got to keep going and keep trying. This is just the beginning, believe me. Life is full of ups and downs and challenges - getting the ''wrong'' exam results won't ruin your life. I read a funny but true quote the other day, it was something along the lines of ''when something unexpected happens in my life I shout PLOT TWIST and move on''. That's exactly what you ought to do - deal with it, remain positive but most of all move on, move forward. What gets me is the people who either get seriously down about 'bad' grades as if it has ruined their life, or at the opposite end of the spectrum, people who get incredibly happy over their results as if it has completed their life. You shouldn't be placing your happiness or self worth on your GCSEs/A-Levels/Degree - none of them will guarantee you the life you want. None of them will guarantee you a job. None of them will guarantee you anything. They are just stepping stones to where you're trying to get to - if you 'mess them up' - find another path! Simple. They are not the be all and end all.

    I get that it's a big deal to you right now - just don't freak out. You'll wonder what you were ever stressing over in a few years - you could easily spend your whole life stressing out over things: GCSEs, A-levels, Uni, Jobs, Taxes, Rent, Bills, the rain - the bloody position of the moon - whatever! But after a while you suddenly realize that it won't make a blind bit of difference how much you over analyse things and worry - only action will change things. So revise, resit, reapply, re-assess you goals - do whatever. Just do something and move on, no big deal.

    Anyway, I'm done with imparting my wisdom on the youth. Go forth and get trollied celebrating or drowning your sorrows!
    Wow you sound like my dad xD well i agree with everything you said but i would like to point out some things where academics help. You mentioned networking well networking first starts from your uni mates and more importantly the people in your batch there is a reason why people are successful if they are from a premium institute as they have benefits of the alumni network . And the intial step in the job market and further progression is much easier from those contacts example if i graduated from harvard bussiness school i would have some sort of familarity with the majority of the top 500 companies consultants hence making me more employable possibly ?. The other point is in some carriers you just need academics for example if you want to be a medic you need to have your academic side covered. Other than that what you said is GOLD
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    It seems so petty now, but anyway... I got a b in one of my econ modules, which came as such a shock. I've been predicted full marks in both units, and I just missed it in unit 1 (97), but got 74 in unit 2. I'm getting back the script, but it really annoys me - while exams I thought had gone terribly went really well, I felt happy coming out of these ones.
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    (Original post by bloodwolfi)
    Wow you sound like my dad xD well i agree with everything you said but i would like to point out some things where academics help. You mentioned networking well networking first starts from your uni mates and more importantly the people in your batch there is a reason why people are successful if they are from a premium institute as they have benefits of the alumni network . And the intial step in the job market and further progression is much easier from those contacts example if i graduated from harvard bussiness school i would have some sort of familarity with the majority of the top 500 companies consultants hence making me more employable possibly ?. The other point is in some carriers you just need academics for example if you want to be a medic you need to have your academic side covered. Other than that what you said is GOLD
    Well your Dad must be a great guy!

    Yeah, there are careers such as medicine where grades are very important. In fact I had quite a few friends who took Medicine at uni and are now qualified doctors. Without their academic abilities they simply wouldn't have been able to become doctors - that's very true and you are right that if someone wants to pursue such a career then they will need the academic ability too.
    However, I also said that if you fail or under perform you need to take action - ''revise, resit, reapply, re-assess you goals - do whatever''. So in the case of someone who had below par grades but who wanted to be a doctor and study medicine then the advice would be to re-assess their goals.

    That doesn't mean to say 'give up' though. It means that you need to give it 100% but if your best still isn't good enough and you've genuinely given it everything you've got, then either re-assess what you want in life and maybe find something else that you could be good at and enjoy OR make your dream a longer term plan so that you have more time to improve. For example, I had friends who took their A-levels, did their degrees, worked in London for 10-15 years and then went back to college to do access courses. I know at least 3 of them are graduating this year (in medicine) and they are in their 30's. Life isn't a race and not everyone is a fast learner - if it takes someone 15 years to finally be in a place in their lives where they know they can get an A* standard in level 3 Mathematics then so be it - they won't care so long as it gets them where they want to be.

    As for contacts/networking - Alumni networks might be very useful for some people but personally I find it much easier to network through the online community/local community events. Our generation (teens to to those in their 20s) is so lucky to have the internet as a resource for talking to people/networking because it can literally build you a career if you're savvy enough.
    For example, I used interest specific websites (I'm an arts graduate and I do lots of creative things) so social media, blogs, students websites etc are really good for getting in touch with like minded people as are community arts events/visiting galleries/attending art classes in my spare time. You don't need university connections to be successful - if someone is determined they'll find a way - just look at people on twitter who get internships/work experience through contacting people i.e TV producers - there are loads of people who get TV Runner jobs through sheer persistence on social media. If you want to get in touch with the 'right' people - the internet makes it possible.

    But if it's academic type people that you need to contact then having a degree from a particular uni is very helpful but it's also not the only way to network with academic types. You can Google almost any university and any department and you can find the e-mail addresses of pretty much all of the lecturer's/professors.

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    E.g. these were random searches off the top of my head:

    http://author.oit.ohio.edu/pols/facultyAndStaff.cfm
    http://biology.stanford.edu/faculty
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/maths/Courses/Office_Hours.aspx

    E-mail addresses everywhere! I actually e-mailed a random professor in the US when I was doing my dissertation at uni because I found an article he'd written years ago and wanted to discuss it with him.


    Nothing is stopping anyone who wants to from contacting them. We live in an age where you can network without having to have your foot in the door already. It's awesome! It's all a case of being brave, not thinking ''oh, I can't just talk to this person - they don't know me and they're so well respected!''. Most people are flattered when you politely e-mail them for advice or opinions.

    Also, I graduated from a good uni in the UK and they have links with a lot of Times 100 companies. That sounds great and a lot unis really make a big deal about their links to companies, but in reality that doesn't translate into much. It just means that if you say you're interested in, let's say, working for Adecco for example - they could get you a place at an Adecco presentation where some employee will tell you and a room full of other students/grads about the company and their values etc. In other words, if you didn't graduate from my uni you could just Google 'Adecco' and educate yourself about the company using their website and how to apply for vacancies.

    So yeah, a lot of life is just learning how to get where you want to be by finding your own way and contacting the right people - not necessarily following a straight and narrow path. Unfortunately that saying ''it's not what you know, it's who you know'' is quite true, especially in the current climate.

    But anything you can do to improve your employ-ability is great - so if you can, stick with education and do your best with it but just know that if it doesn't work out for you right now, there are plenty of chances to go back to it or if you don't enjoy it, there are plenty of ways to be successful without a degree if you work very hard and put yourself out there. Success is about about your ambition, work ethic, vision, and persistence. You can have all that without amazing grades.
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    (Original post by InternetGangster)
    A level maths - C1 - 100 UMS, C2 - 100 UMS, C3 - 97 UMS..... C4 - 78 UMS. Gutted
    Is C4 really difficult? It must be seeing as you got such high UMS's for the other modules. I got my AS modules yesterday, and I just got an A. Does that mean i'm very unlikely to get an A* next year?
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    I got AAAABB and I was upset about one of the B-grades because it was the subject which I got the lowest UMS.

    It was computing ... I had been programming since I was 12; my dad had taught me tonnes about how computers work (his job); and in mocks I always got high A-grades.

    My past experience served to my detriment though because the way they expect you to program in the exam was different to the way I had learnt.

    As a result I flopped the programming module getting a C - requested my paper back and the examiner was annoyed because I didn't stick to conventions . On the theory paper although I got a high A or didn't count because it was weighted 40% compared to the programming paper.

    No one accepted how disheartening this was for me. I was the person who would always answer the questions the teacher asked; I would be the who to help others when they were stuck; I was supposed to get an A.

    I had to revoke my UCAS application for computer science out of embarrassment; drop computing; and apply to Uni the following (this) year to maths. But everyone thought I was being unreasonable because I achieved higher than the average and because my other grades were good.

    The other B was in biology which I didn't care about because I completed it in half a year lol
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    (Original post by cookiess)
    Is C4 really difficult? It must be seeing as you got such high UMS's for the other modules. I got my AS modules yesterday, and I just got an A. Does that mean i'm very unlikely to get an A* next year?
    C4 isn't hard per se compared with C3 but it does have vectors and trigonometry which stumps a lot of student, particularly vectors.

    C3 is more of a progression from C1 and 2 whereas C4 is a bit of an entity in its own right.

    On my exam board OCR MEI we had to to a 1 hour 30 min exam for C4 and then a 1 hour comprehension paper. If English isn't your strongpoint because of the wordiness of the questions you can lose marks. Also if all your gcse knowledge isn't on point you could very easily lose marks here.

    Oh and C4 comprehension introduces abstract concepts of mathematics quite frequently; the ability to learn, understand and use a new concept very fast is necessary.
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    I got an A in one history exam and a C in the other (one mark off a B) and my grade is B overall (AS results). Its not a bad result but I would be lying if I said I wasn't disappointed. Should I risk a remark?
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    I was 1 mark off an A* in Human Biology....... so close, yet so far!
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    (Original post by cookiess)
    Is C4 really difficult? It must be seeing as you got such high UMS's for the other modules. I got my AS modules yesterday, and I just got an A. Does that mean i'm very unlikely to get an A* next year?
    It's not nearly as bad as my result makes it out to be. Some of my friends got an A* in maths, and I was getting over 90% in nearly all of the C4 past papers I was doing. I think the reason I did so poorly was because of bad time management - I spent way too long on one five mark vector question (which I couldn't solve in the end), and I didn't manage to double check any of my previous answers so easy marks would've been lost.
 
 
 
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