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    (Original post by el_architecto)
    Of the four unis, you mention, I have heard the best things about Northumbria, but that may be just because I'm from Newcastle, Manchester scores fairly well consistently on tables, I've heard very little about Trent though. I'm always skeptical of said tables though.<br />
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    And just since you mentioned the RIBA accreditation, if you're looking for a career as an 'architect' rather than in architecture, it is categorically not even worth considering a non-accredited uni.<br />
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    However, assuming you're going for the full architecture career, to some extent, where you go for your Part I degree doesn't matter so much, as long as you can make sure your portfolio is great and that you can get into some experience. Where you go Part II is more important, because after this you're realistically starting to look for a 'proper' job and getting into it as an actual career. Kind of like GCSEs compared to A Levels when your applying for uni.. To my knowledge, the Part I architecture criteria for RIBA accreditation is more restrictive than at Part II, so all universities offer fairly similar courses (or so I have heard).
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    Ok that's great because I am definitely considering it, I think you should be, I agree. That's what I was thinking, it would be a waste of time if I went to a university that wasn't accredited. Oh Ok thats very helpful thank you .
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    (Original post by Howard)
    My thoughts are - DON'T DO IT.<br />
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    The statistics are absolutely dire.<br />
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    44% of architecture graduates are unemployed and a further 18% are employed in a non-architecture-related business meaning only 38% of graduates are making it into the profession.<br />
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    That's a lot of time to invest into training for a profession that the chances are you'll never get work in.<br />
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    <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.archdaily.com/341449/bd-survey-reveals-22-of-uk-architects-unemployed/" target="_blank">http://www.archdaily.com/341449/bd-survey-reveals-22-of-uk-architects-unemployed/</a>
    <br />
    <br />
    That may be true but degrees like architecture and law are great foundations for other jobs even if you don't become an architect or a lawyer.
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    (Original post by Liz L)
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    <br />
    That may be true but degrees like architecture and law are great foundations for other jobs even if you don't become an architect or a lawyer.
    I don't think that's true.

    Surely the fact that 44% of graduates in architecture are unemployed tells us that architecture graduates are not in particularly high demand - within architecture, or outside of it.

    The statistics are for law graduates are equally dire. There are 3000 law graduates coming out of universities each year with zero chance of getting a training contract. And since law is no longer a particularly prestigious degree I doubt their services are in such special demand that they are being snapped up by employees outside of the legal profession.

    http://graduatefog.co.uk/2013/2600/l...ts-des-hudson/

    Regrettably, the fact of the matter is that universities are churning out many more graduates than there are jobs for graduates right accross the board. If you are just wanting a good education then by all means you should feel free to study architecture, law, or whatever else takes your fancy. If you see your degree as a means to an end - (a foundation to a long term career that will actually pay the mortgage!) then you might think twice about what you study.

    Architecture and law are both wonderful things to study - stimulating and challenging. But what then? Ask yourself what you ultimately want from a degree and do your research is all I am suggesting.
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    Your spot on Howard, couldn't have said it better myself. Law has been oversubscribed for about the last decade or so, looking at the charts (I think they may have them on the Prospects website or used to) of the number of people studying Law there is a huge increase that begun a decade or so ago. The numbers studying Law increased by thousands, far beyond other subjects and the general increase in uni numbers. Cases of Law grads who can't find jobs in Law are so numerous as a result and are struggling by in menial jobs because that's all they can get with their law degree, if that, they can't get a look in. Architecture also has too many students with many not a hope of getting a job in Architecture and are often again relegated to menial work. This news article from last year highlights the case,

    http://www.standard.co.uk/news/work/...s-8159842.html

    The above article is not an isolated case, if many people are saying the same thing there is often truth behind it, so its good to listen. Unfortunately, at the age of 16-18 its all too easy to be taken in by of the cuff remarks of uni course leaders, teachers, parents and the ill-informed. Many uni's just want to fill places they don't care what happens to you after you finish the course, they wash their hands with you for the most part, so they will tell you, 'yeah this course is suitable for a wide range of occupations'. Let me tell you now though Employers don't see it that way, they just want the best (i.e. skilled) person for the job (or at least the one that seems to be) there not bothered whether you got a degree in general, they do employ people from different subject areas or people without degree's at all, or people they think have the right attitude and put them through the course you've already qualified in and stood before them with your certificate. Don't expect getting any degree to do you any favours, the odds of it doing you any favours like that are slim.

    Kind of annoys me when I hear people that say they are just doing a degree in Architecture but aren't bothered whether they end up doing architecture or something else. If you want to do Architecture do Architecture, if you really want to do something else then do that something else. Don't see Architecture as a clever way of getting to do something else as your parents suggest, chances are you will be severely disappointed. Put if this way, if you follow what your parents say and it doesn't work out who would you be blaming? Personally, I am always happiest going with what I want (not to say I don't consider others advice) that way if it all goes pear shaped I feel better knowing its my fault rather than being led in the wrong direction by well meaning but misguided advice. Those committed to Architecture are well aware they may fail to get a job in Architecture but there is no plan B, its pretty much all they are into that is why we go into it knowing the risks that we may not get work in it, its not because we think it is a good career move that opens up doors, far from it.
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    (Original post by Stewie2011)
    From what I know they started the Architecture course up at CSM just a few years ago, believe it is now RIBA accredited, CSM is an arts type of school, Jeremy Till (ex-Westminster, ex Bartlett) took over last September I believe. Think the course looks ok, students seem quite positive about it as far as I have heard, would be interesting to hear from any though, what their thoughts are. Don't think it is quite your usual modular structure most courses use, could be wrong on this though or some of the above info so look into it. Fairly mediocre grades to get in I think but probably not as low as UEL - University of East London. So reputation ok to fairly good I think, perhaps a fairly smallish number of students on course, not really got the 'name' branding of Westminster, Bartlett or London Met which some people are attracted to, not myself personally.

    In any case I would say ID, PD and Architecture tend to be a whole different kettle of fish. Sure they're all design based but someone who is good at designing buildings isn't necessarily good at designing product or not as good and vice versa. With ID I think you need a particular interest in interiors, often people excel at designing exteriors, i.e. architecture but hold little interest in the interior beyond the floor plan, its a different interest thing, maybe a slightly different focus of the mind. Often Architecture students are asked to design interiors on the hoof with little training and the result I think are often mixed, often poor even as they have been given little training or time devoted to designing interiors. On Architectural Technology, CIAT courses there is often an avoidance of doing interiors which I believe is the best way. After all, they were split into several subjects for a reason, for efficient use of time and a different mindset I think, doesn't make sense to exhaust oneself treading on each others toes and risk a poorer overall result. Also if your naturally skilled in one subject area why waste time with other subject areas, I mean if your innovative in designing new products you can really cash in as they can be worth a mint when brought to market. Worth saying though that last time I looked most PD courses were hard to get into, high grades, quite a hard course perhaps.
    ok I think I got what you meant here.
    in fact, to be honest, people tried to push me towards so many fields that I completely lost the "what I really like" notion,
    and here as you mention, each job has been separated for a reason.
    I guess Interior design or interior architecture would be more suited for me than architecture on its own then.
    well I'm still so lost.


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