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    Interesting you say Biology A Level isnt necessarily all that helpful... currently stuck in predicament, got a B in Biology and an unexpected A in History AS's, which would be better to keep for A2 in your opinion? Baring in mind Biology would probably be more helpful in securing me a place .. Sorry bit of an unrelated question haha but having difficulty getting answers! Thanks
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    (Original post by larajg12)
    Interesting you say Biology A Level isnt necessarily all that helpful... currently stuck in predicament, got a B in Biology and an unexpected A in History AS's, which would be better to keep for A2 in your opinion? Baring in mind Biology would probably be more helpful in securing me a place .. Sorry bit of an unrelated question haha but having difficulty getting answers! Thanks
    Well, I don't know is the honest answer to that!

    Some of Biology can be useful in terms of background knowledge - the point I was making before was that it's equally possible to do well in biology-related modules without having done Biology before, as long as people have the right mindset.

    The other thing about keeping Biology is that some places might give you a lower offer if you have science subjects - they value scientific experience because psychology is after all, a science. For instance, when I got my offer, it was AAB because I had science-subjects, whereas other people's offers for the same course were AAA - definitely something to consider!

    I haven't studied History since year 9, so I can't comment much on it - although I've heard it's useful for developing essay-writing skills...

    What other subjects are you keeping?
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    Ah ok yeah thanks i see what you mean too much of a difficult decision to make for someone so indecisive haha! I'm keeping Psychology, but will have to resit the AS exams as got a C when was expecting an A, which is a bit annoying... and then keeping English Literature, which is why Bio is probs better cos then I've covered the essay side and the science side
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    This might not be very relevant to the general topic, but how hard is it to get a job/work experience with a psychology degree from UoB? & how difficult is it to progress onto MSc/MRes after BSc?
    Any stories and experiences from friends in psychology field?

    I'm currently researching these topics and I am getting quite worried, seeing as there is a lot of graduates complaining they cannot use their degree because of the huge competition and smaller demand for psychology related jobs.
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    (Original post by OliOliOliOli)
    This might not be very relevant to the general topic, but how hard is it to get a job/work experience with a psychology degree from UoB? & how difficult is it to progress onto MSc/MRes after BSc?
    Any stories and experiences from friends in psychology field?

    I'm currently researching these topics and I am getting quite worried, seeing as there is a lot of graduates complaining they cannot use their degree because of the huge competition and smaller demand for psychology related jobs.
    Tricky question, and one that I hope has a good answer in reality!

    I think the bragging theoretical 'standard' answer is that at least 90% of graduates have either a job or progression onto further study within 6 months of graduation.

    A more realistic response is that is depends on things like:
    • What you actually want to do. Bear in mind that you might not even realise what you'd like to to until halfway through what you're currently doing - I didn't!
    • How good you are at 'selling' psychology and the skills it gives you to potential employers if you go for something that 'isn't psychology-related'
    • Other experience, e.g. it's probably good to get things that are relevant if you can, e.g. if you want to to an MRes or PhD etc, apply for research assistant placements during the course


    I know that clinical psychology is massively competitive, but I don't think the same can be said of all psychology-related fields.

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    (Original post by Magdatrix >_<)
    Tricky question, and one that I hope has a good answer in reality!

    I think the bragging theoretical 'standard' answer is that at least 90% of graduates have either a job or progression onto further study within 6 months of graduation.

    A more realistic response is that is depends on things like:
    • What you actually want to do. Bear in mind that you might not even realise what you'd like to to until halfway through what you're currently doing - I didn't!
    • How good you are at 'selling' psychology and the skills it gives you to potential employers if you go for something that 'isn't psychology-related'
    • Other experience, e.g. it's probably good to get things that are relevant if you can, e.g. if you want to to an MRes or PhD etc, apply for research assistant placements during the course


    I know that clinical psychology is massively competitive, but I don't think the same can be said of all psychology-related fields.

    Hmmm... Clinical psychology was actually an area that I was mostly interested in. Counselling is a second option.
    I guess I'll just have to keep going and keep motivated despite all the negative opinions.
    It's not easy though, while reading things like 'based on all the Psychology Graduates I've ever met, they're all complete nutters that you'd not touch with a barge pole. Completely unemployable the lot of 'em.'
    or
    'They take Psychology to understand their own "issues".
    And when these graduates all feel depressed and develop self-esteem issues, they can go and see one of their colleagues!'.


    Makes my blood boil to see how underestimated psychology is as a degree by some people.

    Thank you for your reply once again!
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    (Original post by OliOliOliOli)
    Hmmm... Clinical psychology was actually an area that I was mostly interested in. Counselling is a second option.
    I guess I'll just have to keep going and keep motivated despite all the negative opinions.
    It's not easy though, while reading things like 'based on all the Psychology Graduates I've ever met, they're all complete nutters that you'd not touch with a barge pole. Completely unemployable the lot of 'em.'
    or
    'They take Psychology to understand their own "issues".
    And when these graduates all feel depressed and develop self-esteem issues, they can go and see one of their colleagues!'.


    Makes my blood boil to see how underestimated psychology is as a degree by some people.

    Thank you for your reply once again!
    Man, those kinds of comments drive me mad too!

    But then, I guess other subjects get flack too - from time to time, everyone thinks theirs is the best and most useful subject ever...

    I actually also had a thought about going on to clinical or counselling when I was in first year, but after looking further into it, decided that it isn't really for me (at least not at this moment in my life anyway - never say never and all that) and I think I'll be most likely to go down a more research-focused path. In honesty, I don't think I thought enough into it, and I probably wasn't thinking about it for the right reasons.

    I think the trick is probably to acknowledge, but not be intimidated by the fact that there's competition. If you want something enough, and for the right reasons, and work hard enough towards it, it usually happens eventually!

    There'll probably be careers seminars in first semester, so look out for the ones that you're interested in and go along - that way you'll get decent information and fairly early on so you can see what kind of situation you'd face.

    But yeah, try not to let any negativity about Psychology get you down - some people don't really know what they're on about after all!

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    (Original post by Magdatrix >_<)
    Man, those kinds of comments drive me mad too!

    But then, I guess other subjects get flack too - from time to time, everyone thinks theirs is the best and most useful subject ever...

    I actually also had a thought about going on to clinical or counselling when I was in first year, but after looking further into it, decided that it isn't really for me (at least not at this moment in my life anyway - never say never and all that) and I think I'll be most likely to go down a more research-focused path. In honesty, I don't think I thought enough into it, and I probably wasn't thinking about it for the right reasons.

    I think the trick is probably to acknowledge, but not be intimidated by the fact that there's competition. If you want something enough, and for the right reasons, and work hard enough towards it, it usually happens eventually!

    There'll probably be careers seminars in first semester, so look out for the ones that you're interested in and go along - that way you'll get decent information and fairly early on so you can see what kind of situation you'd face.

    But yeah, try not to let any negativity about Psychology get you down - some people don't really know what they're on about after all!


    'I think the trick is probably to acknowledge, but not be intimidated by the fact that there's competition. If you want something enough, and for the right reasons, and work hard enough towards it, it usually happens eventually!'

    I like that a lot! Big competition makes it more challenging and the reward and a sense of accomplishment after we find that 'dream job' in such competitive field can therefore also be greater. I just don't like the uncertainty that it comes with. :confused:
    It also it annoys me that people judge how successful graduates are in certain fields based on how much they earn. Surely there must me more to it that just money? Psychology seems like a very rewarding profession, despite the earnings. Can't help but feel like the world is getting more and more greedy/shallow with time.


    Sorry if it seems like a rant haha, I was just doing a lot of online research recently and got a bit frustrated reading some very harsh opinions.
    I just really don't want to make any mistake, so when I see some posts from Psychology graduates who haven't managed to do anything productive with their degree, it makes me wonder if the path I'm choosing is the right one. But I am probably just over thinking.
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    (Original post by OliOliOliOli)
    'I think the trick is probably to acknowledge, but not be intimidated by the fact that there's competition. If you want something enough, and for the right reasons, and work hard enough towards it, it usually happens eventually!'

    I like that a lot! Big competition makes it more challenging and the reward and a sense of accomplishment after we find that 'dream job' in such competitive field can therefore also be greater. I just don't like the uncertainty that it comes with. :confused:
    It also it annoys me that people judge how successful graduates are in certain fields based on how much they earn. Surely there must me more to it that just money? Psychology seems like a very rewarding profession, despite the earnings. Can't help but feel like the world is getting more and more greedy/shallow with time.


    Sorry if it seems like a rant haha, I was just doing a lot of online research recently and got a bit frustrated reading some very harsh opinions.
    I just really don't want to make any mistake, so when I see some posts from Psychology graduates who haven't managed to do anything productive with their degree, it makes me wonder if the path I'm choosing is the right one. But I am probably just over thinking.
    I think I agree with what you're saying, there. As long as I earn enough to live, then earnings are certainly no measure of what my success is. Success is subjective anyway - On some days, success for me is simply turning up to a lecture haha! :P

    I think there's a lot of people who do a degree just for the chance of 'job prospects' and whatever, as opposed to a solid interest in their subject and simply wanting to study it. Of course, part of wanting a degree is to allow yourself more opportunities and the like, but I really don't think it should just be a means to an end because getting a degree isn't exactly a few stepping stones across to a job - within reason, I think that people are still the same people (if that makes sense) that they were before getting a degree. The certificates and graduation pictures hung on your wall won't go out and find you what you want, right?

    A lot of the time, I do hate the uncertainty I have about what I'm going to do next, but at the same time, actually doing the degree itself is something that I've wanted to do for ages. And I don't think it's productive to judge what graduates do straight away or how much they're earning...in fact I always wear my "so what?" face when people tell me statistics about what graduates are up to because, let's face it, I'm not them. So what if it takes a while to find the right job or the right course for afterwards - my friend said something along the lines of "there's no stats on how many birds build their own perfect nest immediately after leaving their parents' nest, is there?"

    What you said about not wanting to make mistakes - try not to worry about that too much because mistakes can turn out to teach you useful things, even if it means you have a regret about something else. (and that sounds like just a poncy thing that people say, but I do think it's true)
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    Just seen confirmation from the psychology society that there will be a book sale day at some point in the first few weeks!
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    (Original post by Magdatrix >_<)
    Just seen confirmation from the psychology society that there will be a book sale day at some point in the first few weeks!
    Have you got any idea how much these books are likely to be?
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    (Original post by ceotel3)
    Have you got any idea how much these books are likely to be?
    I think last year's ranged from £10 to £30 depending on which book you want. All of them are second hand and you will probably get an exact price-list emailed to you before the day of the sale
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    First semester timetables have been/should soon be released and emailed out to you!
 
 
 
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