Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Can I take the option of working the crappy, well paid job for a few years (and building up savings) and then switching to the job I love? I'd be ok with that.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juichiro)
    40/50? That's most of your life feeling miserable doing something you did not like. And just to be able to spend 20/40 years spending more money than you what you will ever use? Also, 30/40 years on working on something you don't like sounds like a recipe for unhappiness, anxiety, depression and an array of mental illnesses.
    No it's isn't. If you work until you're 40/50 and start work when you're 21 (which most graduates do) then you're dedicating 19-29 years to a job which you don't enjoy but pays really well.

    You then have (assuming you live until 80 - 100) a good 30 - 40 years of your life left to enjoy it.

    You don't know what people could do with their millions. They could become sparkling philanthropists who find enjoyment in giving rather than receiving. They could travel the world and have crazy bunny sex all across the globe. They could open up their own franchise.

    Many people can bite the bullet and do it. It's not a bad thing to do.

    If you can't do it, fair enough, but there are many who can and it's really quite absurd to state it'll lead to unhappiness and mental ailments. It's really not a career/life choice to look down on.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Job satisfaction easily.

    Being happy and earning a decent living > higher salary and misery

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Interesting. Been thinking about this question quite a bit recently. My week is always great because, cheesy as it sounds, I really like going to sixth form. I absolutely dread my weekends (even though my job isn't terrible) because I know I have work. Although obviously I get paid which is why I do it, I couldn't imagine what my life would be like if I had that job every single day. I can only just about bear it as a weekend job. Obviously there is the importance of being able to sustain yourself with the job but honestly, money is money and the materialistic things will eventually not mean much or have as much as importance as friends and good memories and just generally being happy. I'd love a job in journalism. I know how bad supposedly that pays but I know that it'll be a good challenge for me to really save my money well and also would just make me happy to have a job I was passionate about.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kagutsuchi)
    No it's isn't. If you work until you're 40/50 and start work when you're 21 (which most graduates do) then you're dedicating 19-29 years to a job which you don't enjoy but pays really well.

    You then have (assuming you live until 80 - 100) a good 30 - 40 years of your life left to enjoy it.

    You don't know what people could do with their millions. They could become sparkling philanthropists who find enjoyment in giving rather than receiving. They could travel the world and have crazy bunny sex all across the globe. They could open up their own franchise.

    Many people can bite the bullet and do it. It's not a bad thing to do.

    If you can't do it, fair enough, but there are many who can and it's really quite absurd to state it'll lead to unhappiness and mental ailments. It's really not a career/life choice to look down on.
    Well you can bit the bullet but good luck keeping your mental health. They work insane hours and mental health problems in the sector are on the rise. Investment banking and burnout go hand in hand. You might not make it to your late adulthood with a decent health. And even if you do, you forgot to say that those "good" 30/40 years belong in the decline stage where our physical and intellectual powers are in decline. Alzheimer, dementia among others could very well steal those years from you. Let's see how many IB go around having funny funny sex and travelling the world. Also, not all IB become millionaires. Hell, you don't even love your job and you want to become millionaire from working on it? :eek:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Well you can bit the bullet but good luck keeping your mental health. They work insane hours and mental health problems in the sector are on the rise. Investment banking and burnout go hand in hand. You might not make it to your late adulthood with a decent health. And even if you do, you forgot to say that those "good" 30/40 years belong in the decline stage where our physical and intellectual powers are in decline. Alzheimer, dementia among others could very well steal those years from you. Let's see how many IB go around having funny funny sex and travelling the world. Also, not all IB become millionaires. Hell, you don't even love your job and you want to become millionaire from working on it? :eek:
    We're talking about a job which you dislike but pays really well - my stating of an investment banker was just an example of a well-paid job which you might not enjoy, so try not to let it stick on your mind too much. It's when you start using little nit-picky details on which to base your whole argument that it becomes absurd.

    Nearly all of what you said is conjecture. Working for 20-30 years, then having 20-30 years of good fun (being subjective, of course) is a definite pay off, especially if the individual doing so values money over job satisfaction. Mental illnesses and physical decline may happen as one ages, but you could also get run over by a car tomorrow - the point being?

    To state people who value money over job satisfaction is a one-way ticket to mental illness-ville is slightly idiotic. There are plenty of fit individuals who work, don't enjoy their work and are paid a large amount. Accountants, lawyers, bankers, etc - the world is full of people in the aforementioned professions who may not enjoy their work but are paid handsomely from it. Who the hell are you to say they're making the wrong choice?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I love my job because it pays well.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kagutsuchi)
    We're talking about a job which you dislike but pays really well - my stating of an investment banker was just an example of a well-paid job which you might not enjoy, so try not to let it stick on your mind too much. It's when you start using little nit-picky details on which to base your whole argument that it becomes absurd.

    Nearly all of what you said is conjecture. Working for 20-30 years, then having 20-30 years of good fun (being subjective, of course) is a definite pay off, especially if the individual doing so values money over job satisfaction. Mental illnesses and physical decline may happen as one ages, but you could also get run over by a car tomorrow - the point being?

    To state people who value money over job satisfaction is a one-way ticket to mental illness-ville is slightly idiotic. There are plenty of fit individuals who work, don't enjoy their work and are paid a large amount. Accountants, lawyers, bankers, etc - the world is full of people in the aforementioned professions who may not enjoy their work but are paid handsomely from it. Who the hell are you to say they're making the wrong choice?
    Working extremely long hours in a job that pays well (most jobs that pay well require you to work insane hours) is one-way ticket to mental illness. IB is one such example. Money can only do so much when your mental health is damaged beyond the critical point. My point is that IB is tough work and getting into it just for the money needs a lot of consideration. You are paid extremely well but in turn, you dedicate 20/30 years of you life almost literally to just working as well as giving up a big chunk of your mental health. It is a big decision that should not be taken lightly (which is what you are encouraging). I did not say IB workers made the wrong choice. I only want to stress that you what you give in more than compensates the salary you get. IB is not a free ticket to easy money. It is not.

    P.S. Getting yourself in a living hell with plans to a future far-off happiness is not the best decision unless you are really desperate. As you said, you might die at 35. What did you spend the last period of your life on? Being happy? Nope. Working like a slave for future that was far away but never came. The "milkmaid and her pail" tale illustrates this point very well.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I just want you to know that I won't be replying to you any further if you choose to incorrectly repeat your line of mental illness - I'd much rather spend my time discussing and debating with reason rather than fabrication. Happy reading.

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Working extremely long hours in a job that pays well (most jobs that pay well require you to work insane hours) is one-way ticket to mental illness. IB is one such example.
    And I'm saying you're incorrect and completely absurd in stating a completely false statement as if it's fact.

    First of all, there are plenty of jobs which are paid extremely well but don't require you to work "insane hours". If you think so, then you are wrong. There are plenty which don't. 8am - 6pm for 4 to 5 days a week is completely reasonable for well paid individuals. What proof do you have that such a schedule will lead to your so preferred statement that it will lead to mental illness?

    Hell, my Head of Service is paid £80k - £100k and he worked 8am - 6pm 4 days a week. Many well paid individuals work office hours - they're well paid because of the responsibility and accountability of their role - not because they work like slave monkeys.

    It is entirely possible, and people do so, to find a well paid job and doing it without breaking yourself in the process.

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Money can only do so much when your mental health is damaged beyond the critical point. My point is that IB is tough work and getting into it just for the money needs a lot of consideration. You are paid extremely well but in turn, you dedicate 20/30 years of you life almost literally to just working as well as giving up a big chunk of your mental health.
    Are you under the warped delusion that all investment bankers, or any individuals with a fairly stressful job, will be rendered comatose by the age of 50 and will have to fed through a series of pipes and tubes for the rest of their life? Seriously?

    So essentially, you're saying no-one should do such a stressful job then. Even if you enjoy it, a stressful situation will be stressful regardless. If you think all well paid individuals work insane hours which in turn deteriorates their health and will force them to become mentally disabled by the age of 50, then no-one should do those jobs.

    Is that what you're suggesting? Because if so, I suggest you re-evaluate your mindset.

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    It is a big decision that should not be taken lightly (which is what you are encouraging). I did not say IB workers made the wrong choice. I only want to stress that you what you give in more than compensates the salary you get. IB is not a free ticket to easy money. It is not.
    No I'm not. I have said there are people who work a job they don't enjoy purely for the money aspect of it. I have never advocated it. I have merely said it is a way of life which people choose and individuals (like you) who mock it or call it wrong are completely out of order because people can live their lives however they choose to.

    Just because it isn't for you doesn't mean people shouldn't do it - neither does it mean they should. We have no right to tell someone how to live or work.

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    P.S. Getting yourself in a living hell with plans to a future far-off happiness is not the best decision unless you are really desperate. As you said, you might die at 35. What did you spend the last period of your life on? Being happy? Nope. Working like a slave for future that was far away but never came. The "milkmaid and her pail" tale illustrates this point very well.
    "living hell"? When did "job you don't enjoy" become "living hell"?

    One works usually with future investments in mind - one doesn't usually live in the moment. I am currently saving for a house. As such, I've cut my spending down to adhere to a very strict budget - this has limited my social life and not allowed me to purchase luxuries which I enjoy. Yes, a duck could land on me tomorrow morning and I could die - does that mean my strict budget and saving was wrong? No. No it doesn't. In that same aspect, neither is working a job you don't enjoy for future goals.

    You really must stop projecting your own bias onto this. If you can't work a job you don't enjoy for the money, then fair enough - but don't mock and insult those who do with the absurd notion that they'll fall to mental health by middle age. Honestly, how rude can you be?

    I have always said you're incorrect. That is because you are. I would not say you are incorrect if you aren't.

    You say individuals who work a job they don't enjoy purely for the money will work "insane hours". This is completely untrue. There are, of course, individuals who do do so, but many do not. You state working these "insane hours" will lead to mental health issues.

    You completely fabricate reality in order to try to be correct.

    This much is truth - if you choose to refute it, go ahead:

    There is nothing wrong with working a job you don't enjoy purely for the money.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Happy, any day, but a lot of jobs that people love, also could pay well? say if you're a yacht business owner
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 10, 2013
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.