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    (Original post by Noble.)
    I went to a worse school than you and I'm currently at Oxford...

    Generally, when it comes to GCSE, both Oxford and Cambridge are more interested in where you ranked in your year, to a point, as opposed to seeing straight As, A*s. Someone with 2 A*s, 4 As, 4 Bs and being top of the year group is more of an achievement than getting 5 A*s, 5 As and being in the bottom 20% of the year group.
    Do universities have access to all grades and scores for every school then? Because there's nothing on the ucas form about where you came in your year. I don't even know where I came in my year group myself.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    My school wasn't bad but I know about the distractions, and I sympathise because people who want to know are often pushed aside, ignored or pushed down because of: 1) government targets achieving Cs (which ignores people who want to aspire higher), 2) teachers trying to break student fights up, 3) lack of interest from parents etc, and 4) bullying/bad friends.

    Considering that you taught yourself you clearly have a good work ethic and attitude, that means you have the potential to go very far in life. Your grades are good too, some people achieve much worse, even with help or tutoring.

    Put it behind you and if you ever have children, you can be sure to give them the start you wish you had.

    This.


    Very true
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    (Original post by joseon)
    Do universities have access to all grades and scores for every school then? Because there's nothing on the ucas form about where you came in your year. I don't even know where I came in my year group myself.
    No, but universities use contextual data. They look at the 5 A*-C pass rates (including maths and science) for the school you attended to put into context your grades. Both Oxford and Cambridge (as well as plenty of other universities) also look to see whether you come from a poor area as this also has an impact on grades.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    No, but universities use contextual data. They look at the 5 A*-C pass rates (including maths and science) for the school you attended to put into context your grades. Both Oxford and Cambridge (as well as plenty of other universities) also look to see whether you come from a poor area as this also has an impact on grades.
    This seems somewhat flawed to me. For example, a school's 5 A*-C rate could be low not because of poor teaching standards but because of having a high proportion of low ability pupils. This would give average-high ability candidates attending these schools an unfair adantage over candidates from schools with better 5 A*-C percentage, but worse teaching standards.
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    (Original post by joseon)
    This seems somewhat flawed to me. For example, a school's 5 A*-C rate could be low not because of poor teaching standards but because of having a high proportion of low ability pupils. This would give average-high ability candidates attending these schools an unfair adantage over candidates with better 5 A*-C percentage, but worse teaching standards.
    No, because at Oxbridge they don't use this data to give offers, merely to reassure them a candidate with comparatively bad GCSEs has potential.
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    Meh

    I got admission into a private school but my parents weren't so keen on paying. It didn't affect me too badly. Admittedly, I had to deal with issues of state schools. Saying that, I was in the top set for most of my classes so it wasn't like teachers were trying to accommodate for the less-able students.

    I got good GCSE results (2 A*s, 7 As, 3 Bs, 2 Cs) but then I went to a proper trash "ghetto" college (my choice and fault). Kinda dragged me down as I always thought I was better than that and should have accepted boarding school.

    I got terrible A-Levels in 2010 (CDd) and I hadn't even done my politics A2, so I had to delay university for a year. I messed around a bit until April when I had to learn A2 Politics and get better grades in Maths and Economics. I got lucky as I scraped B's in both Economics and Maths (1 mark above B grade boundary in both) and I turned my d in AS Politics to a C so BBC altogether. I should've revised much harder than I did, although I left things slightly late

    I could've easily got CCD so I'm grateful for that. Anyway, I ended up at a good university (QMUL) so I'm not really too annoyed at the whole situation
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    I went to a pretty posh school and the students dint study there either. I sort of resent that I went there. I ended up with the grades I aimed for but I think in the long run it fuc*ed me up pretty bad.
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    (Original post by joseon)
    Not really. I managed to get 2 As 4 Bs and 4 Cs having attended a school in which only 42% of my year group got 5 or more A*-C grades. Had I gone to a better school it's reasonable to assume that I would have gotten better grades due to receiving higher quality teaching. Suppose, as a result of better schooling, I had acheived 1 grade higher in every subject, I would have gotten 2 A*s, 4 As and 4 Bs. People have been offered places at Oxbridge with lower grades than that.
    It's not that easy to get into Oxbridge, even with amazing grades. People may have been offered places at Oxbridge with lower grades than that but the vast majority would have 7A*+s. I go to a school where the average person gets 7/8A*s at GCSEs and 44% of A Level grades are A*s, yet 20-25% of the cohort go to Oxbridge every year (around half the people who applied got rejected in my year, including some with very high UMS percentage).
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    (Original post by yl95)
    It's not that easy to get into Oxbridge, even with amazing grades. People may have been offered places at Oxbridge with lower grades than that but the vast majority would have 7A*+s. I go to a school where the average person gets 7/8A*s at GCSEs and 44% of A Level grades are A*s, yet 20-25% of the cohort go to Oxbridge every year (around half the people who applied got rejected in my year, including some with very high UMS percentage).
    Then you go to an unusually high achieving school. I personally know at least two people who go to Oxford or Cambridge with far less than 7 A*s at GCSE. I don't think it's true that the "vast majority would have 7 A*s +".

    Anyway, this is kinda besides the point, all I said was that if I had gone to a better school I would probably be studying at a much better university right now (Oxbridge OR a Russell Group uni).
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    No, my schools have been good although my grades aren't amazing because I chose really hard subjects (biology, chemistry, music and maths AS and of course AS and A2 general studies) and not exactly the cleverest person! Life isn't all about grades. If you took away your grades what would you be left with? That's how you gage success!
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    (Original post by joseon)
    Then you go to an unusually high achieving school. I personally know at least two people who go to Oxford or Cambridge with far less than 7 A*s at GCSE. I don't think it's true that the "vast majority would have 7 A*s +".

    Anyway, this is kinda besides the point, all I said was that if I had gone to a better school I would probably be studying at a much better university right now (Oxbridge OR a Russell Group uni).
    This would say otherwise http://www.sel.cam.ac.uk/Prospectus/...%20Process.pdf. Maybe not the VAST majority but definitely the majority.

    Maybe they had other achievements which were of notable value or maybe they had great AS results or a likely reason would be that they performed very well in the admissions test, which would definitely outweigh GCSEs/ASes.


    _____EDIT: Oh, turns out you've been looking out for universities to apply for...troll thread?

    Plus, good grades don't guarantee you a place at Oxbridge as I said so I'd be careful with what you're saying; it makes the Oxbridge admissions process sound very straightforward. They do also look at contextual value and so do many other universities - did you not contact them to see how your application would be seen?
 
 
 

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