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    HOW CAN YOU PEEPS SAY NOTHING HAPPENS?!?!

    yeah ok we dont know if anything happens neither...but it is silly to say nothing happens neither

    We are all uncertain here!!!
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    (Original post by Captain Titanic)
    You can't die 3 times in one life.
    Depends on how you define 'death.' If you mean Clinical death, then yes you can die 3 times in one life.
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    (Original post by KickboxingOli)
    'Mission failed. Would you like to play again?'
    Not bad.
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    “To die, to sleep -
    To sleep, perchance to dream - ay, there's the rub,
    For in this sleep of death what dreams may come...”
    William Shakespeare, Hamlet
    There is a point in a man’s life when he thinks of death and of what lies beyond the doorway. It is at this time when life takes a back seat, when the bags are packed and he contemplates the journey ahead, into the unknown. I’m sure I’m not dying, not anytime soon, I thought. But who can say, really? Life is so fragile; this bag of meat and bones is so… “mortal” that we can never be certain when it will expire. Till then we will carry on asking the above question
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    I'd like to think I believe in reincarnation, although I don't think I really do. I'm not religious or theist in any way, I just think the concept of afterlife is one that comforts me slightly. Everyone has a second chance at life. I find it hard to visualise in my mind a world where once you're gone you're gone, I find it much easier to visualise a world where you simply take the form of something else, animate or inanimate.

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    There was a magician once that said he could come back from the dead

    he killed himself

    but never came back

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Or did he?


    Edit: I'm really not into the idea of reincarnation, could you imagine coming back as a potato?
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    This is why I'm not scared of death, I wouldn't mind dying just to see what would happen. As long as my death was quick and painless of course.
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    (Original post by james1211)
    I'd like to think I believe in reincarnation, although I don't think I really do. I'm not religious or theist in any way, I just think the concept of afterlife is one that comforts me slightly. Everyone has a second chance at life. I find it hard to visualise in my mind a world where once you're gone you're gone, I find it much easier to visualise a world where you simply take the form of something else, animate or inanimate.

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    well if it comforts you, the individual atoms that make up your body will end up as part of someone else's body
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    All the organic molecules in your body decompose and are then recycled and used by surrounding organisms. If a tree was planted above your grave, you could contribute salts which will then be absorbed into the tree's xylem. So you can technically become part of a tree!

    (This is so damn hippy...)
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    So I got my friend saying he knew a friend who died 3 times in his life. He said that when he died he experienced lot of pain and no sight. It was all pitch black.

    So I'm going to get to the bottom of this by asking TSR. I trust you will have the true answer.

    Thks


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    Near death experiences aren't actually dying, so your friend didn't die...

    There's no reason to suppose anything happens after death, aside from decomposition.
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    (Original post by incipientT)
    Near death experiences aren't actually dying, so your friend didn't die...

    There's no reason to suppose anything happens after death, aside from decomposition.
    There's no reason to suppose it, but there's equally no reason not to. Nobody will likely ever be able to say with confidence what, if anything, happens after death.

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    (Original post by james1211)
    There's no reason to suppose it, but there's equally no reason not to. Nobody will likely ever be able to say with confidence what, if anything, happens after death.

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    That's not a reason to consider them equally probable.
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    (Original post by incipientT)
    Near death experiences aren't actually dying, so your friend didn't die...

    There's no reason to suppose anything happens after death, aside from decomposition.
    If you stop beating and breathing... you are not dead? Of course you are!


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    (Original post by incipientT)
    That's not a reason to consider them equally probable.
    Why isn't it? You can make educated assumptions but since you can never prove either answer is correct, weighing up the relative probability is ultimately futile.

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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    If you stop beating and breathing... you are not dead? Of course you are!


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    Depends on your definition. That's not enough any more to be sure that someone is dead.
    (Original post by james1211)
    Why isn't it? You can make educated assumptions but since you can never prove either answer is correct, weighing up the relative probability is ultimately futile.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I could suggest that a teapot was in orbit around pluto and there wouldn't be any evidence either way. That doesn't mean it is equally likely to be true as not.
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    (Original post by incipientT)
    I could suggest that a teapot was in orbit around pluto and there wouldn't be any evidence either way. That doesn't mean it is equally likely.
    We know that it is unlikely because we can understand that for one to be there, the events that would have to precede it would be unlikely to happen. We can make a more educated guess on the subject than we can about what happens after death.

    It is much harder to disprove or prove that something or nothing happens after death because we cannot judge it's likeliness based on preceding events. Therefore there is no reason to presume to any large extent that one outcome is more likely to be correct than the other.

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    You void your bowels.
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    If he had no sight how could he picture this pitch black scenario...
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    (Original post by james1211)
    We know that it is unlikely because we can understand that for one to be there, the events that would have to precede it would be unlikely to happen. We can make a more educated guess on the subject than we can about what happens after death.

    It is much harder to disprove or prove that something or nothing happens after death because we cannot judge it's likeliness based on preceding events. Therefore there is no reason to presume to any large extent that one outcome is more likely to be correct than the other.
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The teapot is just a random example, you pick anything you like and the same argument would apply.

    We can do studies to see what happens to people with, for instance, damage to a part of their brain and see how it affects them. Why should we expect a persons mind to remain any more intact in a person who is dead than a person who has severe brain damage?
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    (Original post by incipientT)
    The teapot is just a random example, you pick anything you like and the same argument would apply.

    We can do studies to see what happens to people with, for instance, damage to a part of their brain and see how it affects them. Why should we expect a persons mind to remain any more intact in a person who is dead than a person who has severe brain damage?
    The point is we shouldn't expect either outcome. We have concrete evidence of what happens to a persons brain when they suffer brain damage, but not what happens to the mind. Expecting either outcome over the other when there is no evidence to suggest any particular outcome is fruitless.
 
 
 
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