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    (Original post by Greenlaner)
    I have never been a fan of parents who simply shove their young kids into day-care everyday while they work,
    A lot of parents don't have the luxury of being able to afford to live on one income whilst the other looks after the children all day. I was "shoved into" nursery and i've suffered no psychological damage.

    (Original post by Happy Boy.)
    My uncle is 34 and has actually never had a proper paid job apart from some volunteer work he did in the past, he drives and has his own car so that will open up job aspects for him I guess if he wanted to find a job.

    Anyway he has a 3 year old son and he his girlfriend works as a midwife, she is the main source of income right now as she works and he doesn't, however he does all the housework, takes the baby out, does the shopping when she can't.


    is my Uncle a complete layabout or is he actually doing some good whilst being unemployed?
    OP i find it really weird that your uncle at 31 years of age had never had a paid job (before he even had his child...) what has he been doing/living off of?
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    (Original post by LolaLowe)
    to some maybe, but not me. If I worked at my partner didn't then I wouldn't expect to have to shop and clean on my days off, likewise if I was at home with a child all day and my other half was out working I'd make damn sure he didn't have to know where the hoover was or how to work the washing machine!
    You do know that being a housewife / househusband is a full time job, right? You are aware that looking after a young child is tiring and challenging, right?

    So when does the stay-at-home parent get any shred of time off then?

    If you're out working 8 hours a day / 5 days a week, you get to come home on an evening and chill out, and do whatever you want on a weekend...
    but the stay-at-home-parent just basically doesn't get any time off. Not at all. Not ever. Only when the child sleeps and even then they have to see to the house (because it's damned hard to clean a house whilst you're looking after an awake child).

    You might assume being a stay-at-home parent is the easy option. Take it from somebody who has experienced both sides of the coin...it's not.
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    (Original post by A-Dog)
    What a ****, he should be out there hunting buffalo and defending his offspring and wife from nearby men, whilst his wife forages in the nearby woods for berries and fetches jugs of water from the river.

    Apparently men who are stay at home dads have small balls (This is actually a fact, less testosterone, it was on bbc news a few weeks ago)
    Lots of things they say on the BBC news are crap...
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    We know it's you, OP. It's not someone I'd go for but if it works then I guess it's fine.
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    (Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
    You do know that being a housewife / househusband is a full time job, right? You are aware that looking after a young child is tiring and challenging, right?

    So when does the stay-at-home parent get any shred of time off then?

    If you're out working 8 hours a day / 5 days a week, you get to come home on an evening and chill out, and do whatever you want on a weekend...
    but the stay-at-home-parent just basically doesn't get any time off. Not at all. Not ever. Only when the child sleeps and even then they have to see to the house (because it's damned hard to clean a house whilst you're looking after an awake child).

    You might assume being a stay-at-home parent is the easy option. Take it from somebody who has experienced both sides of the coin...it's not.
    all true. I too have experienced both sides of this coin, and being at home with children is a full time job its true, but spending the day playing and going out for walks and on adventures, and reading and drawing and making cookies is a joy! laundry/cooking/cleaning and maintaining a large house can easily be fitted in with a bit of organisation. Whilst its true that I am 'on duty' 24/7, I spend time in the day playing on the beach, riding bikes, chasing bees, painting, playing with train sets, dressing up etc which cant exactly be described as hard, and as such I would never expect someone who goes out to work to share the domestic responsibilities. Other systems of distributing responsibility works for others, but this works for me.
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    (Original post by Happy Boy.)
    My uncle is 34 and has actually never had a proper paid job apart from some volunteer work he did in the past, he drives and has his own car so that will open up job aspects for him I guess if he wanted to find a job.

    Anyway he has a 3 year old son and he his girlfriend works as a midwife, she is the main source of income right now as she works and he doesn't, however he does all the housework, takes the baby out, does the shopping when she can't.


    is my Uncle a complete layabout or is he actually doing some good whilst being unemployed?
    you try raising a kid and then come back and say stay at home parents dont do any work.

    if shes happy to support him and hes happy to raise the child then let im carry on.
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    (Original post by DavidRoberts)
    Lots of things they say on the BBC news are crap...
    No, I don't agree (I think you mean Fox news). Also, this is scientific fact, it is in a scientific journal.
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    (Original post by Happy Boy.)
    My uncle is 34 and has actually never had a proper paid job apart from some volunteer work he did in the past, he drives and has his own car so that will open up job aspects for him I guess if he wanted to find a job.

    Anyway he has a 3 year old son and he his girlfriend works as a midwife, she is the main source of income right now as she works and he doesn't, however he does all the housework, takes the baby out, does the shopping when she can't.


    is my Uncle a complete layabout or is he actually doing some good whilst being unemployed?
    is his surname by any chance gallagher, i think i might know him?

    i think hees pretty cool
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    I have a better example. I live with my mate. I pay for his tuition fees, living expenses, traveling, etc. I often cook and wash clothes and dishes. We are just friends, like family friends. No sex is involved. Pure friendship, pure communism based. He does not work. So what?
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    not your business, sonny.
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    If his partner is supporting him and he is doing the lion's share of housework and childcare then so what. If they are happy with their arrangement then it is no one else's business really.

    I am at uni now, but before that, I had not worked for a few years and my partner was supporting me. No kids either. The amount of people that felt the need to comment on our relationship was ridiculous.
 
 
 
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