Why are calculators not allowed in C1? Watch

TenOfThem
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#21
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#21
The harder the maths, the less the need for a calculator
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Kvothe the Arcane
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#22
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
The harder the maths, the less the need for a calculator
Because there's more algebra and trig using regular values?
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TenOfThem
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#23
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(Original post by keromedic)
Because there's more algebra and trig using regular values?
Because there is more algebra

I worry about A Level students who jump to the calculator too quickly

Even if there is a need to "evaluate" that really should only be done at the end of a question

The boards could test the same level of understanding without the use of a calculator for the vast majority of the material covered
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Kvothe the Arcane
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#24
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Because there is more algebra

I worry about A Level students who jump to the calculator too quickly

Even if there is a need to "evaluate" that really should only be done at the end of a question

The boards could test the same level of understanding without the use of a calculator for the vast majority of the material covered
I suppose so, thinking about it. Even things like binomial expansion could be done mentally (or on paper).
I'm just trying to think of a topic where it'd have to break down but I'm drawing a blank but would you say it'd be hard to do that in stats?
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Dragonfly07
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#25
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The long multiplication problem is something that got me in GCSE but never in A-level. If it happens in a paper without a calculator, all it means is that you probably failed to see a simplification of an equation and so you went about it the wrong long unnecessary way.
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Maid Marian
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Because C1 is hardly rocket science! :facepalm:
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TenOfThem
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#27
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(Original post by keromedic)
I suppose so, thinking about it. Even things like binomial expansion could be done mentally (or on paper).
I'm just trying to think of a topic where it'd have to break down but I'm drawing a blank but would you say it'd be hard to do that in stats?
Ok

I agree that some parts of Stats do need calculations that would be better with a calculator

But then, I do not really think of Stats when I think of Maths (oooo controversial)
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Kvothe the Arcane
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#28
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Ok

I agree that some parts of Stats do need calculations that would be better with a calculator

But then, I do not really think of Stats when I think of Maths (oooo controversial)
Yep.
Lol. I was just about to say that, I'd agree if you said Decision instead of stats but then I remembered that discrete maths is a genuine part of maths at degree level!
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davros
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#29
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There is probably very little material in the A Level Core modules that requires a calculator - numerical methods/approximations being the obvious exception.

Applied modules are clearly different where the emphasis is on applying a particular method and coming out with a real world, numerical answer.

Personally I'd make all the Core modules non-calculator with the exception of one of them and put all the numerical stuff in the remaining module
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GottaLovePhysics! :)
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#30
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#30
(Original post by WGR)
I can understand GCSE maths because that's (mostly) everyday maths but A level?
Well put it this way, three years on from C1 im in second year doing a Maths degree and we arnt allowed a calculator for any of our modules, we are expected to perform a certain level of mental arithmetic.
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