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    I'd recommend instigating a number of interesting activities each week that he can't resist wanting to go to. E.g. concerts, shopping, theme parks, short holidays etc. That way you're not telling him not to do something, instead positively showing him there is more interesting stuff out there.

    I used to play video games all the time and can still happily spend a day doing nothing else. I have no problem with it. It was interests in other things that eventually helped me limit my time.

    Does he have other interests?
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    (Original post by SecretDuck)
    Or any of the TES games :ashamed2:
    Agreed. Morrowind pretty much took away my entire life between 15 and 19 and now I'm back on it again at 24 The shame...
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    (Original post by Welsh_insomniac)
    Agreed. Morrowind pretty much took away my entire life between 15 and 19 and now I'm back on it again at 24 The shame...
    I have Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim to keep me occupied
    • #2
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I'd recommend instigating a number of interesting activities each week that he can't resist wanting to go to. E.g. concerts, shopping, theme parks, short holidays etc. That way you're not telling him not to do something, instead positively showing him there is more interesting stuff out there.

    I used to play video games all the time and can still happily spend a day doing nothing else. I have no problem with it. It was interests in other things that eventually helped me limit my time.

    Does he have other interests?
    Crap advice!!!!!!!... :eek:

    OP should help his ikkle bro study, it is good he's worried and concerned though which is sweet. Make learning fun for him when revising. Show him an e.g of how to balance working hard then playing... I never had my old sister there for me in life, instead I helped HER in every schoolwork etc to make sure she did well, not the other way around. He's lucky he has you!
    • #2
    #2

    If you must take him out during exams, go to the library, museum, galleries, holidays or some short trip which is relevant to a taught subject that makes it appealing for him. As a last resort, sports or yoga or similar which may simulate and relax his mind briefly for short periods
    • #2
    #2

    Maybe even encourage him to hang around with a group of aspiring nerds, to be study buddies
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    I am 16, and I am also addicted to consoles, I spend a lot of time playing on my XBOX 360 and my computer like League of Legends and GTA 5 on xbox. One of the reasons for this is that there is nothing at home to do. (I am trying to speak for him as we are in kind of the same situation) However my parents are different, what I want is to do more activities as a family together, but my parents don't do that, so I just go on gaming as it also takes my stress away. So if your parents are not like mine, tell them to take him out to places more, buy him some new clothes, basically more fun family trips and stop him from playing games. This has got nothing to do with parents being strict, my dad use to beat me, but I still play to this age, it is about if you parents understand you brother, or how they spend time with him. Unfortunately my parents don't spend time with me and I am addicted to gaming so my grades are suffering but I can't help it. So yh, I don't know if this helps but just saying what the problem MIGHT be!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Crap advice!!!!!!!... :eek:

    OP should help his ikkle bro study, it is good he's worried and concerned though which is sweet. Make learning fun for him when revising. Show him an e.g of how to balance working hard then playing... I never had my old sister there for me in life, instead I helped HER in every schoolwork etc to make sure she did well, not the other way around. He's lucky he has you!
    I don't disagree with you on helping him to study, of course that's what I want in the long term. So I totally agree with what you're saying. My suggestion was mainly to help show him that there is more interesting stuff to do than play video games. I know from experience it can be hard to ween yourself off of Playstation.
    • #2
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I don't disagree with you on helping him to study, of course that's what I want in the long term. So I totally agree with what you're saying. My suggestion was mainly to help show him that there is more interesting stuff to do than play video games. I know from experience it can be hard to ween yourself off of Playstation.
    Re-read what you'd wrote. Sorry, I think we mainly have the same point

    True, it is good to get out so he doesn't end up being socially awks. My sister is the opposite of me so she doesn't like talking to anyone, making friends, socialising and having fun, is very much only about studying and working or only watching TV at home... Which has meant that I'm glued to the internet at home really, it is really bad but my area isn't safe to go out and well I only really tell my parents if I'm drinking or going out as they don't judge me badly unlike my sister who looks down on that. I became a gamer really young and did lots of activities as a kid like karate and had extra tuition classes on the weekends and weeknights to keep me busy everyday and make friends. Gaming distracted me but was an escape mechanism, much like how I love to read, write and do art.

    Every older sibling should be like OP. Take him out drinking a bit but not for too many, watch over him when partying
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    I actually think to a certain extent, MMORPGs with the online communities did keep me behaved but very naive as I genuinely trust anyone in real life. Like reality, I look for role models on the internet and there have been very few like I surprisingly even met an academic financial man online who played an MMORPG and it shocked me that he works in Wharf! :eek: This was ironically a safer option for me than going out in my area with hoodrats...
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    PS3? I'd suggest he at least invest in purchasing a PS4. He's getting behind the times.

    But seriously, I'm amazed at people who having been 15 themselves at some point in their lives can't seem to grasp what this poor chap is going through. A non-conformist attitude, doing poorer than usual at school... It's called being a teenager.

    If you take away all his things, he will feel controlled and will rebel even harder. He'll find other outlets to chip away at you as 'revenge'. You can't fight fire with fire in this situation and controlling him even further will make him strongly dislike you, and/or your parents.

    Play a couple of games with him, get to know him, suggest he spend less time on it during. Don't force. Suggest. Escalate as required.
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    My oaremnts used to think I played a lot but I did alright:smug:

    Seriously, hide the controllers.
    • #1
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    #1

    Thank you to all of those who have answered my post with helpful advice.

    To those who say I am not much older and can't really say all of this... I myself do not play computer games and do not wish too. But the general change in my brother is not due to just hormones. He is my brother so i can say what I need to.

    Thank you to those who have replied with sensible answer and to those who can sympathize and are in the same situation, I hope we can get our siblings back soon
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi there, I am just looking for some advice really.

    I live with my mum, dad and 15 year old brother. He is currently in his first year of GCSE's. I am 20.

    Almost 2 years ago, my brother was given a PS3 as a gift for Christmas. He used to be limited to one hour a day.

    He has a PS3 Tv, laptop for coursework ONLY and a phone. His phone is to be left out of his room as is his laptop and PS3 controller.

    Now he is 15 and I fear he is becoming addicted. My reasons for this are:
    1. He is struggling to get off to sleep. He used to be so good at it.
    2. He is becoming aggressive. Yes, he is a teen and yes his hormones must be going mad but I mean more than normal. Not just with his mouth but he is physically aggressive sometimes too.
    3. His school work is suffering.
    4. He doesn't follow any instructions and always seems to bring people down.


    My parents are great parents.

    At night, there is always an argument about coming off the pS3 and this sometimes lasts for 2 hour though.
    When he is beyond control we take EVERYTHING off of him but for some reason this no longer works. He still manages to get around the ban and then we are back to square one.

    I guess what I am trying to say is that every waking minute that he is in the house, he is on that damn PS3.

    Does anybody have any tips for dealing with this? Any routines?
    I am a disabled woman and struggling to stand up to this 15 year old raging teen.
    Please don't say " Oh your parents aren't strict enough" or " he's got you wrapped around his little finger". We are really trying. We've enough going on in this family...

    Any help would be greatly received.

    From a desperate sister...
    Hello there,

    My name is Phillip and am currently doing a research portfolio on Video Game addiction and was hoping to ask if you would be available for an interview Hypothetically of course as this is for a university project which means it wont be used. I can also send you my research.

    Thanks
    Phillip
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    (Original post by ph2ll2p93)
    Hello there,

    My name is Phillip and am currently doing a research portfolio on Video Game addiction and was hoping to ask if you would be available for an interview Hypothetically of course as this is for a university project which means it wont be used. I can also send you my research.

    Thanks
    Phillip
    That sounds like the worse thing to do a project on since it's been proven its wrong so many times and been proven that playing games helps with certain things.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Taking things from me as a child would not work, (it looks like it won't work with him) it would just aggravate me even more.
    Treat him like an adult, and have a proper conversation with him, you or your parents about his addiction.
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    (Original post by Caedus)
    Throw the PS3 out of his bedroom window and onto the concrete below. He'll thank you in 3 years time... probably.
    As someone who became addicted to Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, I can only agree with this. It will eat at his life like no tomorrow and the best thing I ever did was sell my consoles on eBay before university. I totally changed my life and I see gaming as a major waste of time unless done in small spells. I'll play FIFA maybe once a fortnight now, if that, and two hours at most.

    Luckily for me I still done well enough at college to get good grades and move on to university but for 1 year - 2 years that game was all I'd do. I'd come in from college and play it until the early hours of the morning. I lost a girlfriend over it stupidly and thats my own fault but you live and you learn.

    These days I am far more interested in applying myself in the field I want to work in and earning qualifications that are going to help me or working to get paid.

    In all seriousness the best bet is to put the console in the living room and allocate a time he can go on it per week. People think game addiction isn't that serious and whilst it may not be as bad as drugs or drink it's still bad in the sense that you've thrown away precious time in your life. Yes at the time it seems like a lot of fun but when you grow up you look back and think 'really I wasted all that time playing that?'.
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    (Original post by kumori)
    That sounds like the worse thing to do a project on since it's been proven its wrong so many times and been proven that playing games helps with certain things.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I am also a gamer and I have done enough research to understand there is a problem involving many cases on this, Im looking at the extreme cases of the addiction. Its classed as an addiction when gaming is all they can think about. They are only happy when gaming, I have statistics to back this up.
    I also understand gaming can help children to develop.
    • #2
    #2

    I know quite a few people including myself who've had gamer issues. Surprisingly the person in Wharf has a top-flyer job but even he at work wasn't able to concentrate, would apparently look tired, just thinking about gaming and wanting to go home to cater to responsible roles on an MMORPG online. It was a learning point from me, as this person is nice and doing extremely well in career, highly academic
 
 
 
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