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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    I was happy to, but I'd sooner argue with Cambridge (where, in all probability, I'm never going near) than with my college.
    11A*s, 2As GCSE. 3As and a B, averaging 85-88%, predicted 2 A*s and an A.
    And it's a world youth championships which I would have considered not attending, had I not been told due to its importance and academic nature that they would do everything possible to avoid it being an issue
    Maybe you have simply been mislead in that they told you it wouldn't be a problem but it is.. However, there's loads of fab unis out there who will snap you up so don't worry about 1, especially Cambridge who have very few places for a very high number of applications - 16,500 or something this year in total!
    It's better to be rejected very early than after an interview leaving you even more confused at to what happened (I'm sure that's going to be my case in January lool)
    Also, about the Gap Year - Why not get a super good job and pay your way for a year while doing some exciting things tk add to your P.S. and apply to Oxford next year? Prove to your parents you can do it with little of their help

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    To be fair you should have been atleast given an interview, but your UMS is on the low side and your personal statement and reference may not have been the greatest. Cambridge themselves say that they look at the whole package, which includes GCSE grades, AS grades, A2 predictions (although this isn't considered as seriously as the others), personal statement, reference and your interview. From the looks of it if your p.s. and reference aren't good then it is likely the reason why you were rejected as your GCSE's were the only good thing about you. Best advice anyone can give now is that move on with it, if your heart is really set on Cambridge I suggest working your socks off this year, get all a stars (or the most you can) and reapply next year with a stronger application and personal statement. If you can give your full UMS scores here maybe someone could give a definite advice on what to do next.
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    If you genuinely think it was unfair, then I think you should send an email to enquire about it - there is nothing to lose by doing so.
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    Thanks guys, you've given me some really solid advice for where to go from here, and most of you are right in telling me to just accept it and move on. But like I say, I figure wasting a hour on a letter to get either an explanation or ignored completely is fine. Anyone know where I'm best sending it? I'd phone up to ask, but don't think they'd appreciate me phoning to ask how to complain about them
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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    Thanks guys, you've given me some really solid advice for where to go from here, and most of you are right in telling me to just accept it and move on. But like I say, I figure wasting a hour on a letter to get either an explanation or ignored completely is fine. Anyone know where I'm best sending it? I'd phone up to ask, but don't think they'd appreciate me phoning to ask how to complain about them
    I don't understand why you're complaining, you just need to ask why you were rejected. Considering your UMS, it's far more likely that you were rejected on the basis of them than the alternative.
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    Cambridge is a hole of a town anyway


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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    I'm fairly sure they've not treated me unfairly, but I would like to write a letter in case I get lucky and it changes anything, or even gets them to tell me that it was down to my UMS or something. Even if it does nothing (so 99% likely), I'll still be able to say I did the best I could. Cheers
    Look at this thread, in which a Cambridge admissions tutor answered questions about the process, for details about UMS and lots of other helpful insights: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2439538
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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    Hi guys, recently got a letter from Downing saying that they won't be offering me an interview. Obviously I was gutted, but my college have told me that I should appeal on grounds of bias, and that I was misled whenever I asked them for information. They've told me to write a letter explaining how I was unfairly treated, and they've given me one to send with it. I know that it's very unlikely to be successful, but since I can't apply next year, has anyone got any advice on what I should say, or where it needs to be sent? Thanks in advance
    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    I don't think that my college is right calling it bias, but I have a genuine reason that I can't attend an interview on a certain few days. When I asked at the open day, and phoned them up, they said that my reason was enough for them to accept it and give me a fair chance. Unfortunately, the interview dates for my course are all when I can't make (I didn't know this when I applied) and I got a swift rejection letter. My school assumes that it's due to them not wanting to make an exception by inviting me for an interview at another time, or showing my application to other colleges.
    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    And everyone else, I know that I'm probably wasting my time, but my college is insistent that it's worth trying, and after going to an open day, applying early, phoning them to make sure I'm not disadvantaged by not being free to interview on some dates, I'm okay wasting a little bit more time on this
    You should start by asking why you were rejected, if they haven't said. If (say) your UMS was not high enough, you'd have little to complain about. But if it's because you have declared yourself unavailable for interview, then they are not being unfair. AFAIK, it's a standard clause in any invitation to interview that they do not guarantee to offer an alternative date, and it's up to you to decide whether you have higher priorities.

    HOWEVER... if you've mentioned those dates to Downing at an open day and/or in a phone call, and they said it wouldn't be a problem, AND everything else in your application was satisfactory, THEN you may have grounds for an appeal. Basically, that would mean they told you one thing, and now they are telling you something different. Is that what you were saying in your second post? If so, focus on that point, and give dates and names if you can, but don't pursue 'bias' - that isn't remotely the right grounds for an appeal. And get the letter reviewed - tbh, your first post was very confused and not at all compelling in terms of setting out your case. You should also be clear about what you want them to do about it (ie, what remedy you are looking for). I can suggest three things... (1) that they look again at their diaries and offer a date which doesn't clash with dates you previously said you cannot make, (2) that they help you put your application in front of a different college, and/or (3) that they will guarantee you an interview in next year's round (obviously, you'll have to deal with your parents on that one).

    Incidentally, my old school would take the case on themselves, if they thought it had merit - they wouldn't expect a student to pursue it. The teacher who has told you to appeal may not be the right person to be helping you, and you should maybe ask (or get your parents to ask) a different member of staff to phone Downing and ask them to reconsider. Good luck!
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    With those GCSE and A/S it probably would have been more sensible too apply for oxford (oxford give more weight to GCSE than UMS)

    in terms of the appeal. Might as well do it if you want to. I can sort of relate to the situation. I've applied to Oxford. Pretty sure I will get a rejection. But I'd rather know definitively than have that lingering doubt. Mathematically speaking my chance of being accepted is 15%. If I didn't apply it was 0%. 15 vs 0 why not ?.

    and remember when it comes to oxbridge. its just a funny old system and given the calibre of applicants some of the finest students in the UK will not have the chance to study there. there is truly no shame in simply being rejected.
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    Mate don't listen to the utter nonsense on this forum, appeal if you want, your college knows more than we do, this 90% UMS benchmark is nonsense, my friend got in averaging less than 90 in each of his 4 subjects, he was given a difficult offer and he worked hard to make it. They've already said no, if you appeal and it doesn't work out, they say no again, no big deal. If it does work out however, then you have a chance of getting in. You have nothing to lose, everything to gain, if your school's backing you just go for it.
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    It's just as wrong to assume that you didn't get in because of 'low' UMS as it is to assume that you didn't get in because of you being unavailable for interview. Call them up to check why (I think unis are obliged to give feedback?), and since you're not re-applying, I cannot see how then can be any negative consequences of appealing whatsoever, you only have something to gain.
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    (Original post by KnapAttackUK)
    and 3As and a B at AS. The three As were in maths, f. maths and physics, averaging 85-88% in all of them. I'm applying for physical NatSci, never had any serious discipline issues, high attendance, etc.
    that's why you were rejected i think. Your AS's were poor (UMS wise), but yeh, as others have said, don't listen to us, call the college up and try get feedback!
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    (Original post by R.P.Everything.)
    It's just as wrong to assume that you didn't get in because of 'low' UMS as it is to assume that you didn't get in because of you being unavailable for interview. Call them up to check why (I think unis are obliged to give feedback?), and since you're not re-applying, I cannot see how then can be any negative consequences of appealing whatsoever, you only have something to gain.
    You think wrong. Unis don't have to give feedback. Many will, but for lots it will be something vague and generic like "the standard was high and others were better"
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    (Original post by Juno)
    You think wrong. Unis don't have to give feedback. Many will, but for lots it will be something vague and generic like "the standard was high and others were better"
    Does the Freedom of Information Act not oblige them to do so in the same way that they are obliged to release specific application statistics if requested? I have yet to hear of a university that does not provide application feedback (even if it is a bit vague), and I have a hard time believing that universities would spend large amounts of time providing feedback simply out of the kindness of their hearts. Cambridge definitely provides feedback for applications though; I decided to check their website.

    http://www.study.cam.ac.uk/undergrad.../feedback.html
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    If your school were very knowledgeable in Oxbridge applications in the first place, they would have advised you to apply to oxford instead seeing as your GCSEs were perfect for them.

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    (Original post by Pastaferian)
    You should start by asking why you were rejected, if they haven't said. If (say) your UMS was not high enough, you'd have little to complain about. But if it's because you have declared yourself unavailable for interview, then they are not being unfair. AFAIK, it's a standard clause in any invitation to interview that they do not guarantee to offer an alternative date, and it's up to you to decide whether you have higher priorities.

    HOWEVER... if you've mentioned those dates to Downing at an open day and/or in a phone call, and they said it wouldn't be a problem, AND everything else in your application was satisfactory, THEN you may have grounds for an appeal. Basically, that would mean they told you one thing, and now they are telling you something different. Is that what you were saying in your second post? If so, focus on that point, and give dates and names if you can, but don't pursue 'bias' - that isn't remotely the right grounds for an appeal. And get the letter reviewed - tbh, your first post was very confused and not at all compelling in terms of setting out your case. You should also be clear about what you want them to do about it (ie, what remedy you are looking for). I can suggest three things... (1) that they look again at their diaries and offer a date which doesn't clash with dates you previously said you cannot make, (2) that they help you put your application in front of a different college, and/or (3) that they will guarantee you an interview in next year's round (obviously, you'll have to deal with your parents on that one).

    Incidentally, my old school would take the case on themselves, if they thought it had merit - they wouldn't expect a student to pursue it. The teacher who has told you to appeal may not be the right person to be helping you, and you should maybe ask (or get your parents to ask) a different member of staff to phone Downing and ask them to reconsider. Good luck!

    This is by far the best response on the thread,

    Two things worry me about your school. Firstly that they are putting the onus on you to take this up with Downing and secondly the reference to bias. It is obviously not bias and whist one might expect a person with little education who has been turned down for say a social security benefit or who has lost a county court small claim to immediately jump on the bandwagon of bias, one would not expect that from a school which should be assuming professionalism in fellow education professionals.
 
 
 
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