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    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    I know what you mean.

    It makes sense for him because he is a developer/programmer, and being a programmer is a very rewarding career, too, if you enjoy it. I am starting a master's in computing myself, too.

    But it has almost nothing to do with being a support analyst or ICT specialist. So unfortunately you do have to pick one path and stick with it.

    Programming is more creative and fun, and usually pays much better (at least in North America), but also much more difficult, and you have to get a Computing degree.

    However, if you do a computing degree, you will have a lot of difficulties getting a support analyst/network admin job, because there are a lot of people who have done courses designed for those roles, and they would be more qualified than you will be.

    It's like saying you want to be either an investment banker or a chef... They don't hire investment bankers with a degree in Culinary Arts, or chefs with a degree in Finance. It's the same thing with development/ICT. You just have to pick one.
    Oh right I see :s. hmm im not sure then i'll have to think. Because yes I've always wanted to learn how to program though but I aint amazing at maths and I worry if I wouldn't be able to cope. maybe ill look into these other course things you've been talking about.
    Okay so I'll be doing college soon for two years, should I think about doing the course related to support analyst/network after college then?
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    (Original post by lamar008)
    Oh right I see :s. hmm im not sure then i'll have to think. Because yes I've always wanted to learn how to program though but I aint amazing at maths and I worry if I wouldn't be able to cope. maybe ill look into these other course things you've been talking about.
    Okay so I'll be doing college soon for two years, should I think about doing the course related to support analyst/network after college then?
    That's something only you can decide. I would recommend researching into both options more, figure out exactly what they are like, before deciding on one.

    Computing does require a bit of math, but it's not very bad. Definitely not as bad as something like engineering. As long as you didn't have too much trouble with pre-university maths, you should be OK. There's a lot of logic, though. You need to be very good at reasoning, etc.

    Are you doing college in something else first? Or does college mean something else here?
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    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    That's something only you can decide. I would recommend researching into both options more, figure out exactly what they are like, before deciding on one.

    Computing does require a bit of math, but it's not very bad. Definitely not as bad as something like engineering. As long as you didn't have too much trouble with pre-university maths, you should be OK. There's a lot of logic, though. You need to be very good at reasoning, etc.

    Are you doing college in something else first? Or does college mean something else here?
    Ah okay well I'm a C/B grade student at maths. I got my GCSE's soon.
    Hmm im not sure if i know what you mean?? I start college this september "Computing and Infomation Technology - Extended Diploma 180 credits". is what ill be doing ?

    Also ive read up on other things and people have become like analysts etc from having a computing degree ;/ and its on the list of jobs for undergraduates. And surely a computing degree would seem good to employers even if it was for a support ict job (because they'll know that you know technical computing terms etc.
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    (Original post by lamar008)
    Ah okay well I'm a C/B grade student at maths. I got my GCSE's soon.
    Hmm im not sure if i know what you mean?? I start college this september "Computing and Infomation Technology - Extended Diploma 180 credits". is what ill be doing ?

    Also ive read up on other things and people have become like analysts etc from having a computing degree ;/ and its on the list of jobs for undergraduates. And surely a computing degree would seem good to employers even if it was for a support ict job (because they'll know that you know technical computing terms etc.
    Hmm ok... must be some education system differences I don't understand. In North America, college is equivalent to university (for the most part).

    Sure there are people doing those jobs with a computing degree. There are people doing software development jobs with an electrical engineering degree, too (myself). They will hire you if you have the skills no matter what degree you have, but computing doesn't teach you all you need to know for those jobs. You would have to learn most things on your own. It probably would not seem better to an employer than someone with specific training in those areas.
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    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Hmm ok... must be some education system differences I don't understand. In North America, college is equivalent to university (for the most part).

    Sure there are people doing those jobs with a computing degree. There are people doing software development jobs with an electrical engineering degree, too (myself). They will hire you if you have the skills no matter what degree you have, but computing doesn't teach you all you need to know for those jobs. You would have to learn most things on your own. It probably would not seem better to an employer than someone with specific training in those areas.
    Ah okay I understand what you mean. But yh I think I'll plan to do Computing at uni, and then after do ComptAI Certification, and the other for the job i want .?
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    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Hmm ok... must be some education system differences I don't understand. In North America, college is equivalent to university (for the most part).

    Sure there are people doing those jobs with a computing degree. There are people doing software development jobs with an electrical engineering degree, too (myself). They will hire you if you have the skills no matter what degree you have, but computing doesn't teach you all you need to know for those jobs. You would have to learn most things on your own. It probably would not seem better to an employer than someone with specific training in those areas.
    College in the UK is a separate school you can go to once you're 16 ^#^ we can choose to stay in high school and keep doing a range of subjects or go into something more specific by going to college :3
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    (Original post by Furandesu)
    College in the UK is a separate school you can go to once you're 16 ^#^ we can choose to stay in high school and keep doing a range of subjects or go into something more specific by going to college :3
    Ah! I see. That makes sense. Wish we had that here, too.
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    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Ah! I see. That makes sense. Wish we had that here, too.
    Yeah sorry haha I guess you were getting mixed up, I didn't make myself clear :P
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    (Original post by lamar008)
    Okay that's the thing, I would do computer science but I anit fantastic at maths? im a C Grade student?
    Depends what uni you apply to some such as Brunel Kent and Westminster have a more practical approach than mathematical which is why they can take you with a grade c in maths

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    (Original post by lamar008)
    Hey okay then, so are you doing Computing right now? and do you t hink it's good?
    but what i want to know is would I be capable of doing jobs like a ICT Support analyst, network administrator, or ict specialist etc...from having a Computing Degree?? Not a computer science degree? or can i with both? any anyone answer this question pls
    Yes with both you can get any basic job in the IT industry

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