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    Exams are of roughly the same standard as they were 'back then'. People that sat the exams back then and are involved in education: teachers etc, say so.
    I think that the better performance of students is explained by all the things stated above.
    Teaching has got better. Students are more receptive to teaching. Past-papers complete with examiners reports and mark schemes are available widely. You can be much better taught for a particular exam these days than you could 'back then'. You have the opportunity to do re-sits till you die etc etc
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    I have seen a-level papers from ages ago, and not only was the content far greater and therefore the detail bigger so the exam harder but apparently they marked more strictly. For instance for chem a-level there would be like 8 points to cover in a 5 mark question, but as long as you got 5/8 you got the marks when i did it!! Which is ridiculous. The content is slowly being cut down, and so as a result i would suggest that the syllabus is becoming easier.

    once again i reiterate, dad told me stuff he did for GCSE maths (like logs) which aren't done nowadays until half way thru AS... point taken? the same was true for phys and chem where they did far more advanced stuff, and way cooler practicals lol.
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    i agree that a levels are getting easier. i have just recieved my a level results where i gained full marks in one of my modules despite one of the questions asking me to write about two situations and i only had time to mention 1.but then again i'm not complaining bout the A grade i recieved! i also read on the AQA website that they are going to reduce the amount of modules that candidates sit from 6 to 4.i mean how much easier are they making it? in the end they'll be giving us the answers on the answer booklets!
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    Crikey, open book exams for all!! Having said that, at uni in Singapore the open book exams mean that you can take literally anything you want in except a computer, so basically you can have essay plans, your full notes ... EVERYTHING... saying that, they must expect a higher level of detail or something to make it a chalenge.
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    (Original post by Dilly)
    i agree that a levels are getting easier. i have just recieved my a level results where i gained full marks in one of my modules despite one of the questions asking me to write about two situations and i only had time to mention 1.but then again i'm not complaining bout the A grade i recieved! i also read on the AQA website that they are going to reduce the amount of modules that candidates sit from 6 to 4.i mean how much easier are they making it? in the end they'll be giving us the answers on the answer booklets!
    It's so they can go into further detail with the topics int the modules.
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    Keep telling yourself that... the ones they go into more detail on will be the easier topics ... did you never hear your teachers say at school "they have deemed this too hard so axed it/made it A2 etc", i heard this all the time in chemistry.
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    There's no need for me to keep telling myself that it's simply what has been said on the exam board websites. I wont be doing a 4 unit A Level.
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    (Original post by Lewis-HuStuJCR)
    I have seen a-level papers from ages ago, and not only was the content far greater and therefore the detail bigger so the exam harder but apparently they marked more strictly. For instance for chem a-level there would be like 8 points to cover in a 5 mark question, but as long as you got 5/8 you got the marks when i did it!! Which is ridiculous. The content is slowly being cut down, and so as a result i would suggest that the syllabus is becoming easier.

    once again i reiterate, dad told me stuff he did for GCSE maths (like logs) which aren't done nowadays until half way thru AS... point taken? the same was true for phys and chem where they did far more advanced stuff, and way cooler practicals lol.
    Yes but my point is that the exam system has got better not worse (with the exception of coursework particularly at GCSE level).
    'Back then' they didn't have the organisation of syllabuses that they have today. We do the right content at exactly the right time.
    The only real change that has been made is the ones that I mentioned in my last post and therefore that is the only explanatory factor.

    The 'standard' of the student is the real problem and has been slowly decreasing. 'Back then' people probably didn't do NVQs/media studies and the like because it was considered sub-standard. Well, of course they really are sub-standard qualifications but its just that more people are doing them instead of 'good' A-level subjects.
    The number of people that are doing science subjects at degree level has gone down, Why? Because they are considered too hard.
    The number of people that are doing easier/social sciences such as Sociology/Psychology has gone up, Why? Because they are considered easier.
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    Lets accept the real reason all of these problems exist: the govt loves statistics, andin order to get its stats up make the necessary changes to massage the public into thinking its education system works. Of course, we ... with an ounce of sense see through this, but I doubt the vast majority of voters do (especially if they have no current involvement in the education system of this country). for instance, the fact that the next school along to me could use their GNVQ as equiv to 3 GCSEs at A*-C is ludacris, and therefore their percentage of ppl with 5 was full, remove that and it went down hugely (this is one of the worst comps in the country). Indeed, my headmaster wrote an article in the local press slating this practice, and also the fact that they listed their results in the paper as those students obtaining grades A*-G, what a joke.
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    Oh and another point.
    I don't think that our 'western' and 'developed' society really value the education system as a whole as 'eastern' societies like China and India do.
    Education is seen as the way forward in those latter two countries (and others) there are so many more graduates being produced in those countries (factoring in the relative size of those two countries compared to the UK).
    Its very strange that the same cannot be said for teenagers in the UK, the majority of which are trying to find the easiest route out of education and as fast as possible.
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    Its the asian work ethic, for instance they treat things such as bankruptcy as a serious social stigma and you are basically outcast if that happens to you. Look at the UK, after 3 years you get auto discharge from bankruptcy, not exactly a huge stigma there... OK so there are problems with it but auto discharge is a terrible idea.

    But you are right, they are proper drilled into being hardcore in asia...
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    Personally, I haven't taken the A-levels but most of my friends have, both the Hong Kong and British ones. In Hong Kong, only around 1% of the population taking the tests get an A in a subject test. The people who get 3 A-levels here in Hong Kong are considered cream of the crop, no question. Some people might say that the education system here in Hong Kong is about drilling info into the students, that may be the case (memorization being most important) in the HK-style GCSEs, but when it comes to HK A-levels a lot more depth, understanding and analysis is needed.

    However, if someone even suggested making a limit of "A"s in a subject, or like in Hong Kong, only 1% of the population of test-takers achieve this grade, I think that person would be forced out of his job.
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    IB is the way forward, at least its testing.
 
 
 
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