COmmute for 3 hrs to UNI.......Feasible? Watch

HannahZ
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#21
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#21
Once you move on to university you are unlikely to keep on with life as it was in the 6th form. You friends will be moving on too. However much you think you will be able to keep everything the same, things just change.

You also said that you don't care about uni experience. How can you know that you don't care about it when you have never experienced it. IMO it is one of the most important parts about going to uni. To miss out on it deliberately beats me. I'm dumbfounded. :confused: Getting to know people and mixing with other students is such an important part of uni life. I feel you're missing the point of what it's about. It's not just about collecting a piece of paper at the end. For mature students I could understand not wanting to mix socially with 18 year olds and having a home and family might give them different priorities. But for any young person, being part of everything that's going on and taking part in sports or social activities are just as important as academic study. Living there with other students is what it's all about.

It's not just the social life. The actual work is easier to do when everyone else is having to study/write essays/revise etc. You can bounce ideas of friends, discuss projects, share books panic together. It's just so much better to be living with other people doing the same thing and understanding what you are going through and sharing ideas etc. Some courses make you do group projects and you really need to be in close contact with the people that you are working with. Once you get to uni level work you can't always discuss it with your Mum.

You coluld always get a part time job near uni. or go home at weekends to work and see friends.
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nikki
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#22
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#22
I think it's a very bad idea.

Firstly, you don't know how many days you'll be at uni. If you have to go in for 2 hours a day, 5 days a week, it will be very expensive. Living so far away will make taking full advantages of the resources at the uni much harder and uni is an ideal time to learn to be independent because you'll be surrounded by people in the same boat as you.

Also, if you're anything like me, 3 hours on a train will be completely shattering.

(Original post by Dez)
To be fair, train delays/cancellations are not the big problem everyone makes them out to be. After taking the train into college for two years (10-minute ride), I'd estimate that 95% of all the trains I caught were within two minutes of their schedule.
It varies around the country and a 10 minute journey is nothing like a 1.5 or 3 hour journey. I've done quite a bit of short distance, medium distance and long distance train journeys and I'd say that the longer the journey, the more likely delays are simply because there's more time and distance for something to go wrong.
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Alan Smithee
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#23
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#23
Not feasible. Not if you're serious about study anyway.
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Dez
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#24
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#24
That's true, but it's still nowhere near as bad as some people think.
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smilee172
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#25
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#25
notice how you haven't had a single positive response here yet, in favour of commuting. i was going to comment on the fact that you say you would be able to keep a part-time job, but frankly the only free time you would have is the weekends and by the then you would probably be shattered! i realise this has already been commented on, as has the fact that you assume you will be in for only 3 days but the likelihood is you have 1 hour on one, 5 hrs on another, and that would be a damn expensive lecture. if you're serious about commuting, really seriously think this through. try and find some people who have commuted themselves for uni and see what they think.
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Pseudomuse
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#26
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#26
i dont think its a good idea. you also run the risk of missing lectures due to the bad transport!
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la fille danse
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#27
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#27
Or if you're really into this whole "commuting" idea, you could always, you know, go to a university less than three hours away from you...
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nikki
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Dez)
That's true, but it's still nowhere near as bad as some people think.
True... but sod's law, the day you have to go to an important lecture, the trains'll all be delayed.
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El Scotto
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#29
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#29
(Original post by jo_ukcrew03)
I was wandering if it was a good idea to commute to uni for 3 hrs if one could not get cheap accomodation from uni or their uni landlord lists. Dont care about the uni experience because I am more worried about my debt at the end of my degree than anything else. So far I have come up with these:
Pro:
--can continue working on a part-time basis
--Still have same life as in sixth form
--I know people who have previously drove to their uni which was 3-4 hours away from their home, 3-4 days a week. At least I will be taking the train and sitting on my A** throught most of the journey.
--If I was living in uni accomodation then I would have to spend more than £150 on rent+food+entertainment. If living at home then food is free, and 3 days(dont know how many days I will have lectures or classes) train journey cost which should be below £150 possibly.
--No train cost for all the weeks in holidays. (christmas,easter NOT summer vac)

Cons:
--Missing out on uni experience>Dont care.
--if there is a class at 9:00 Am then will have to get up early>it's only 3 days a week possibly (I am not sure how many days a week though)
long journeys may tire me and reduce study time>that's why got the weekends and any days I wont be travelling.

Sorry for the long post. But, any advice, comment or addition to above list will be really appreciated .


personally I think you'd be off your tits to do a 3hour commute.
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santogold
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#30
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#30
I would strongly recommend against it. If you have a day like 9 am lecture and 3 pm seminar, you will be spending so much time just hanging around. I bet your thinking right now is that you will do work on the train, but it isn't always possible. Also, trains can get very crowded, cancelled and whatnot.

Try to get a room in a flatshare and eat healthy. That should keep your costs low. If you don't care about the uni experience, then you won't have to go out that often either.

And, you probably won't be able to work p/t anymore, because you may end up spending 18 hours or more on the train. In that case you could nearly get a f/t job at uni!
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santogold
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#31
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#31
Also, you can't just pop into the library if needed.
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tommorris
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#32
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(Original post by laurah)
notice how you haven't had a single positive response here yet, in favour of commuting.
I posted a positive response in favour of commuting. I commute to uni, and it's easy as pie. But I'm not sure whether the thread started meant a three-hour round trip or three hours each way. The former is easy, the latter is excessive.

(Original post by HannahZ)
You also said that you don't care about uni experience. How can you know that you don't care about it when you have never experienced it. IMO it is one of the most important parts about going to uni. To miss out on it deliberately beats me. I'm dumbfounded. :confused: Getting to know people and mixing with other students is such an important part of uni life. I feel you're missing the point of what it's about. It's not just about collecting a piece of paper at the end. For mature students I could understand not wanting to mix socially with 18 year olds and having a home and family might give them different priorities. But for any young person, being part of everything that's going on and taking part in sports or social activities are just as important as academic study. Living there with other students is what it's all about.
Student life: it's overrated. I spent a year in halls. The people were okay, but I ended up spending a lot of money living in a fairly crappy place without the comforts of home, and the only opportunities for a social life was a couple of crappy bars and a student union that looked a bit like one of those pubs you find in railway stations.

I don't buy the student social life stuff - I think it's a big myth constructed by advertisers to get people to buy more beer and Pot Noodles and think they have disposable income when in fact all they've got is debt.
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amie
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#33
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(Original post by tommorris)
Student life: it's overrated. I spent a year in halls. The people were okay, but I ended up spending a lot of money living in a fairly crappy place without the comforts of home, and the only opportunities for a social life was a couple of crappy bars and a student union that looked a bit like one of those pubs you find in railway stations.

I don't buy the student social life stuff - I think it's a big myth constructed by advertisers to get people to buy more beer and Pot Noodles and think they have disposable income when in fact all they've got is debt.
But at least you gave it a try. Personally I don't think it's overrated, I've had an absolutely fantastic time and can't wait to get back. Out of my friends at my own university and various others, I don't know anyone who hasn't enjoyed the student lifestyle. Point is, some people like it and others don't. How will the OP know whether he likes it or not until he actually experiences it for himself? At least then he'll be able to make an informed decision.
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HannahZ
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#34
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#34
If you are going to commute make sure that your uni has a good communication system set up. I know someone who commuted 2 hours in each direction. Quite frequently lecture times got changed and on several occasions cancelled altogether. She travelled 2 hours there only to find a piece of paper stuck to the door to say that the lecture was cancelled or re-scheduled for another time. She only came in a few days a week and then only for a few hours. She didn't really make any good friends and seemed quite isolated and a bit lonely. I felt sorry for her.

Stay at uni for the first year so that you get a chance to meet people and make friends. If after the first year you don't rate university life particularly, then try out commuting to save money. Also the numbers of lectures often goes down for second and third years.
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hugsnkisses
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#35
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#35
Goodness me, that is a long way isnt it!
I am commutting this year first year at uni, first year commutting,i have never done it before, quiet scared to be honest, however i cant afford to live in, as it would cost me 2-3000 a year whereas by commutting it is going to cost me 357 because of a special card you can buy in south yorkshire that means i pay the 357 and get travel on all buses trains and trams free.
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Happy1
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#36
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#36
Are you serious!? Thats a ridiculous distance to commute. If you go to uni, youll have debt... fact.

Look, you'll send more on petrol or transport in that ridiculous commute than you will on accommodation if you do this. I think you're mad to even consider it.
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Arminius
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#37
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#37
Also with sucha commute i don't think you'll be able to have a socail life at home, OR at uni.

I think you need tod ecide if uni is for you. if not, do something at home. if yes take the plunge like everyone else. This half-way measure is not practical in the slightest,
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sexysax
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#38
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#38
I think that students commuting a short distance isn't too bad, but 3 hours is a long way to commute, and I would recommend against it.
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ladyportacabin
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#39
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#39
That is just... silly! Have you looked at train fares? Try qjump.co.uk or thetrainline.com.

When I was at college, I had 16 hours a week of classes but they were so spread out that I had to go in every day. You might end up having a 6 hour round trip for one hour at uni. And in peak time you won't get a seat so don't have any misty eyed visions of being able to sit with your laptop and do essays.

I know debt is really scary, but maybe you could see a financial advisor at uni? You can live cheaply, and if you work part time you can keep debts to a minimum. (The student loans are an incredibly low rate and repayments start at £7 a month when you earn 15k).

Good luck!
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smilee172
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#40
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#40
like ladyportacabin said, you may end up making a 6hr round trip for an hour long lecture - imagine how annoyed you would feel if you turned up to this lecture after a long 3 hr train journey and the lecture was a bit of a waste or u didn't find it very helpful/interesting, then had to make the 3 hr journey home. I think you'd find it a rather large hassle!
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