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    (Original post by pbunny)
    I was just about to recommend economics! I was recommended to take it by my counselor since my other highers are pretty hard (bio/chem), she said it's a pretty simple group 3 subject and few people have problems with it. Plus, it has a high percentage of 7's relative to other subjects which is an added bonus!
    Glad to hear it, I heard it was a very interesting subject.
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    I haven't read through the posts so I might be saying the same thing someone else has already said and in that case, my apologies.

    I personally have taken both in HL and here's my opinion.

    Chemistry – each topic is different. Organic Chemistry is used in almost all topics, but except that, you won't lose any marks in a topic cuz you didn't do well in another. For example, you won't lose any mark in Energetics if you don't know anything about Stoichiometry or Acids or Bases or whatever.
    In extra material for HL, you don't learn "new topic", but you just go into more detail and solving problems can get "trickier" due to that. Difficulty wise it's not that difficult, but it can get pretty "tricky" to get the right answer.

    In a nutshell, chemistry is easy if you take it as SL, but becomes very tricky (not hard, but tricky) when taken as HL.

    Physics – even if you take it as SL, it's hard – and tricky. When you take it as HL, you don't necessarily go much more in depth, but you rather learn more material. So if you're gonna take a SL, I would say chem would be much more easier, but if you're taking HL, both would be almost equally challenging.







    If you're gonna be doing either of them, here are some hints that I wish I knew earlier.

    For both subjects, ALWAYS check the syllabus. The syllabus CLEARLY outlines what EXACTLY you need to know for the IB. There will be – I repeat – there WILL be materials that your teacher provide you that's not necessarily in the syllabus, but helps you to understand what IS in the syllabus. But for exam purposes, you can discard them. So please check with the syllabus for both physics and chemistry. If the syllabus says you need to "define" a term, you should be able to. On the other hand, if the syllabus doesn't say you need to define it, you don't need to regardless how important that word/concept might be. If the syllabus says "explain", you really gotta know your **** about that etc. The syllabus is pretty much useless for most subjects, but for natural sciences, I think they're extremely helpful. (And for social sciences as well, to some degree)

    2nd tip: for physics, you really need to know what each symbols represent. Even if it's the same alphabet, say F, it could mean elastic force (F=kx), gravitational force (F=Gmm/r^2), electric force (F=kqq/r^2) or F=BILsinx or F=qvBsinx etc... so you really MUST know which is which.

    3rd tip: for physics, you MUST know about topic 4: waves and oscillation (topic 11 also if you're HL), topic 5: electric currents (topic 12 also for HL) and topic 7: atomic and nuclear physics (topic 13 also for HL). All the other topics are based on these 3 topics (6 for HL), so if you can't do these, you're basically ****ed – which I was and had to work my ass off to catch up before the IB.

    I hope this helps. I'm getting my result tomorrow and it's quite amusing to see new people entering the IB. Best of luck to ya.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Glad to hear it, I heard it was a very interesting subject.
    I took economics IGCSE and I agree it is quite interesting but some topics are outright dry.
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    (Original post by SPark9625)
    I haven't read through the posts ...Best of luck to ya.
    Thanks, this was very useful. I'll probably end up taking Physics at HL and Chemistry at SL.
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    (Original post by qewrtyu)
    I guess if you don't need chem for your degree its best to do economics cos it sounds easier and will maximise your score.
    hmm thats really strange, guess biology is seen as the easiest science. haha i don't exactly love bio, I just prefer it to the other sciences.
    True, there really is no need to burden myself with a difficult subject if unnecessary! So i'll go with economics despite the fact that I enjoy chemistry more (but only slightly).

    I agree, it is quite odd but oh well. Just prefer it? I'm not trying to interrogate you, promise. But why plan on doing a degree in the sciences if you only ''prefer'' them? Surely, other subjects interest more since you aren't very keen about the sciences. It's better to think these sort of things through deeply. Trust me, been there done that!
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    (Original post by pbunny)
    True, there really is no need to burden myself with a difficult subject if unnecessary! So i'll go with economics despite the fact that I enjoy chemistry more (but only slightly).

    I agree, it is quite odd but oh well. Just prefer it? I'm not trying to interrogate you, promise. But why plan on doing a degree in the sciences if you only ''prefer'' them? Surely, other subjects interest more since you aren't very keen about the sciences. It's better to think these sort of things through deeply. Trust me, been there done that!
    Well sciences are basically the only subjects I'm good at, plus I'm not really sure what else I could do a degree in. I enjoy history but I'm not even taking it next year as it isn't possible to do two sciences and two humanities
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    Ohkay, skimmed through most of the conversation. I personally took Math, Chemistry and Economics HL and got 7 in Chemistry and Economics and was 1 mark away from getting a 7 in Math HL (I know...unlucky but hey what can I say ) . So I hope my suggestion helps (I will also be talking a BIT about physics since my friend took it and he takes it in HL and got a 7 in it)

    1. Are you passionate in Chemistry + Hardworking?
    This is the most underrated yet cliched question, yes, but it's true (and I'm generally a proponent of people taking subjects they're passionate in). Depending on your teacher, don't get me wrong I love my teacher, but he didn't really teach me anything over the past 2 years. He has only taught me the basic parts for each topic (like for example in further organic option G he has only taught me the mechanisms and I had to further understand what activating and deactivating groups are that is required to explain the acidity and basity of different organic compounds) but he has also motivated me to read the textbook and self study for most parts - ie. to work hard on your own. Chemistry is a tough subject and there is a great discrepancy between SL and HL Chemistry. I would suggest if you really like chemistry, you would definitely have the dedication to read through the textbook and gain knowledge on something you don't understand (the concepts aren't simple so reading the textbook and writing notes on your own beyond classes is definitely useful). So if you like chemistry, go for it.

    2. Economics is definitely easier than chemistry, but don't underestimate how if you find it easy, others will as well
    Yes, Economics is definitely easier to get a 7 than say, chemistry, physics, or maths. It constitutes a lot of theories, curve drawings, understanding, memorization of different definitions and terms and good analysing skills. Some topics - ie. development - can be a pain/bore in the ass since it's mostly common sense. However, things like Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and International Economics are really interesting (I personally love Theory of the Firms in Micro, analysing policies in Macro and the Marshal Lerner Condition in Int. Econ). Generally if you're a person who likes analysing stuff, who can write a detailed response and argument, who can memorise a LOT of definitions (by definition i mean precise definitions) and who can do a bit of mathematical economics (you need to memorise formulas for that as well for paper 3 econ) then you'll do just fine in Economics. However, what bugs me is that when people tend to say "Yes economics is one of the easier way out," Yes it is yet at the same time I differ - It is the easier way out, yet at the same time it can be difficult if you cannot get the concept or if you simply analyse things in the wrong way (the structure goes like - define, diagram, diagram analysation, example, argument, conclusion) - there is a set structure for analysing economics - and hence that is why some people may not like economics since it rather forces people to answer things in the way that 'economics examiners' like and that may be different to how you usually analyse things. Moreover, if generally people find it easy, then the grade boundaries will be usually higher (like all other papers, if people internationally find it easier, eventually the grade boundaries will be higher).

    PS. People who do not have prior knowledge to Economics as a subject will not be at a disadvantage and therefore this is why many people choose Economics HL as they won't be behind and everyone will be at the same level as not everyone will have taken Economics IGCSE/GCSE.

    3. Are you good at maths?
    By being good at maths, I'm not saying whether you like maths or not, but I literally mean are you actually good at it? If you're not, don't even attempt Math HL (It's so virtual I was about to die learning vectors). However interesting story, my friend who 'likes' maths but is not really good at it (he originally did math HL but couldn't handle it the 2nd year and therefore dropped to Math SL) got a 7 in physics HL. So if this rather clears your doubt about whether you should do Physics HL yet at the same time you're not that good at maths...then there you go, from this example SL Math seems to be 'adequate' for Physics HL. But I've heard that Physics HL is one of the hardest HL in IB but don't count this on me since I didn't do Physics (But am still proud of that A* in IGCSE Physics haha )

    4. Your school and the IB
    By that I mean, how well did your school do in general for IB? Look at the past results from different students, the stats and stuff. Most importantly, your teachers - are they good at teaching? if not, at least are they good at motivating students to learn independently? IB, to me - since most of my teachers aren't good teachers but are great at motivating me to work hard - is all about hardwork and learning independently. Make sure if you are going to take Economics, Chemistry, Physics or Maths (I don't think you want to take Maths HL right?) HL, and your teachers aren't that type of teachers who teaches well, then be prepared to put in extra work in your free time to learn everything stated in the syllabus and write good quality notes on your own.

    5. The IA's and Courseworks
    Is a PAIN IN THE ASS for Chemistry - and trust me I thought I was going to get a 6 due to my IA's and Paper 2 but thank lord. It constitutes 'Design,' 'Data Processing,' and 'Evaluation,' and if you don't like doing this/have second thoughts about this then I guess don't take Chemistry. But at the same time, if you believe you can do well in the papers and pull your IA marks up then go for it!

    Economics IA's are fine - find some articles that are 6 months old and analyse+evaluate+construct an argument using the theories you've learnt - so I would go ahead and do Economics if you feel like doing this

    I hope this helps...PM me if you want to know more about Economics, Chemistry or Maths HL ! And Good luck with everything!
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    (Original post by SPark9625)
    I haven't read through the posts so I might be saying the same thing someone else has already said and in that case, my apologies.

    I personally have taken both in HL and here's my opinion.

    Chemistry – each topic is different. Organic Chemistry is used in almost all topics, but except that, you won't lose any marks in a topic cuz you didn't do well in another. For example, you won't lose any mark in Energetics if you don't know anything about Stoichiometry or Acids or Bases or whatever.
    In extra material for HL, you don't learn "new topic", but you just go into more detail and solving problems can get "trickier" due to that. Difficulty wise it's not that difficult, but it can get pretty "tricky" to get the right answer.

    In a nutshell, chemistry is easy if you take it as SL, but becomes very tricky (not hard, but tricky) when taken as HL.

    Physics – even if you take it as SL, it's hard – and tricky. When you take it as HL, you don't necessarily go much more in depth, but you rather learn more material. So if you're gonna take a SL, I would say chem would be much more easier, but if you're taking HL, both would be almost equally challenging.







    If you're gonna be doing either of them, here are some hints that I wish I knew earlier.

    For both subjects, ALWAYS check the syllabus. The syllabus CLEARLY outlines what EXACTLY you need to know for the IB. There will be – I repeat – there WILL be materials that your teacher provide you that's not necessarily in the syllabus, but helps you to understand what IS in the syllabus. But for exam purposes, you can discard them. So please check with the syllabus for both physics and chemistry. If the syllabus says you need to "define" a term, you should be able to. On the other hand, if the syllabus doesn't say you need to define it, you don't need to regardless how important that word/concept might be. If the syllabus says "explain", you really gotta know your **** about that etc. The syllabus is pretty much useless for most subjects, but for natural sciences, I think they're extremely helpful. (And for social sciences as well, to some degree)



    I hope this helps. I'm getting my result tomorrow and it's quite amusing to see new people entering the IB. Best of luck to ya.
    Thanks for your reply . I think I will probably end up doing chemistry as it will probably be more useful to me.
    Hope you got the results you wanted
 
 
 
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