Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

The fault in 'The Fault in out Stars' Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zoe.louise)
    I think it was the fact that he already had a large following of young adults due to his shared youtube channel. I agree though, there are so many other books out there that deserve the popularity and praise.
    Ah okay, thank you for answering! x
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WhiteRose100)
    Ah okay, thank you for answering! x
    You're welcome! :-) x
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rileyj)
    I suppose different people make different connections. Personally, I feel as though you were given just enough background into their characters for you to be able to feel who they are and to act out scenes in your head with your own depiction of what the characters would be like.

    the fact that they speak in that manner emphasises that they are different. they aren't your average close-minded teenagers, they are LIVING and I think the book is inspirational.

    i like how the book is real like they know they're dying because everybody is. the story is intriguing i.m.o
    I read something once about a metaphor in the book linked with the grenade on the video game that Augustus and his friend. It went on about how the character on the game jumped on top of the grenade to save the people on it, and then describes how (SPOILER ALERT) Augustus' death was him jumping on the grenade that Hazel described herself to be. Can't quiet remember exactly how it went, but it was something along them lines and it was pretty cool.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    The purpose of books isn't necessarily to be realistic,but rather to make you think. Tfios did just that,so props to John Green.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaslight182)
    I read something once about a metaphor in the book linked with the grenade on the video game that Augustus and his friend. It went on about how the character on the game jumped on top of the grenade to save the people on it, and then describes how (SPOILER ALERT) Augustus' death was him jumping on the grenade that Hazel described herself to be. Can't quiet remember exactly how it went, but it was something along them lines and it was pretty cool.
    Also the part where they were watching a movie on the plane,and although they both pressed play at the same time,Augustus' movie ended first,symbolising how he'd die before Hazel.
    ****ing genius
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I never read the book and wasn't interested at all in going to see the film but me and my friend somehow ended up going to see it as we wanted to see 22 jump street but it turned out there was some problem with the screen
    We didn't want to go home so decided to see tfios, and is it bad that we laughed at the parts that were meant to be sad? Meanwhile all the other girls in the cinema were crying and we're sitting there trying to stifle our laughter.. Especially like when he died and stuff.. Not that I find cancer funny, it was just the acting
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by itsRochana)
    Also the part where they were watching a movie on the plane,and although they both pressed play at the same time,Augustus' movie ended first,symbolising how he'd die before Hazel.
    ****ing genius
    There are so many metaphors hidden in the book, which makes me sad that most of the audience (teenage girls) probably missed.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by itsRochana)
    Also the part where they were watching a movie on the plane,and although they both pressed play at the same time,Augustus' movie ended first,symbolising how he'd die before Hazel.
    ****ing genius
    Didn't realise that! I presume there are lots of hidden metaphors in the book, but for me, if a book is enjoyable and unforgettable then it's a great book. I don't really care for all the literary stuff in them, had enough of that with English Literature and Language. For me, TFIOS wasn't a good book. I tend to read a lot of horror though, so that may be why I'm not too keen on it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Finally some people who don't find the Fault in Our Stars to be a work of literary genius.

    People kept recommending it to me so I read it about a year ago and it was frankly a waste of my time. The characters were cliches and the book was a formulaic 'this will make teenage girls cry' money making plot.

    Whilst reading it, I realised that the reason for its popularity was that it pandered to the majority of teenagers hopes and dreams. A lot of young people are confused about where life is going and want to make meaning of it; the protagonists of this novel are the type of teenagers who are intelligent and use metaphors in every other bl**dy sentence. Teenage girls want a hot guy. August is a hot guy who falls in love with Hazel; it is blatantly obvious that her character was created with the idea that readers would easily be able to use her as a self-insert. These factors amongst other things made me think that it was not a very heartfelt book but instead extremely manufactured.

    Augustus was a pretty annoying male lead; him being so pretentious made me want to put the book down a lot of the time. However, a lot of defenders of TFioS say 'OH but John Green wrote him to be pretentious so that you could see it was all an act when he dies'...
    No! Maybe John Green meant him to be an annoying little sh*t, but that doesn't mean I like him any more!

    Finally (sorry for the long post) this book was just too similar to all of Green's other YA novels. Main character meets romantic lead who is mysterious and meaningful. They go on a sentimental journey together and realise ultimate truths about the world. Romantic lead dies and main character is left to ponder their existence and why romantic lead was taken so young. The only difference here was that the roles were genderbent and cancer was added to the mix.
    I didn't feel as though this book portrayed young people, let alone young people with cancer well at all.
    There are definitely books which deal with the sensitive subject matter better.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saibhandari)
    Finally (sorry for the long post) this book was just too similar to all of Green's other YA novels. Main character meets romantic lead who is mysterious and meaningful. They go on a sentimental journey together and realise ultimate truths about the world. Romantic lead dies and main character is left to ponder their existence and why romantic lead was taken so young. The only difference here was that the roles were genderbent and cancer was added to the mix.
    I didn't feel as though this book portrayed young people, let alone young people with cancer well at all.
    There are definitely books which deal with the sensitive subject matter better.
    Hit the nail on the head here, it's why I'm not a huge fan of his books, nearly all his books have characters with similar voices and plots to some extent as you've mentioned. That same humour that all his main characters have, similar sidekicks to the protagonists etc. He's not that great a writer.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saibhandari)
    Augustus was a pretty annoying male lead; him being so pretentious made me want to put the book down a lot of the time.
    This. I hate pretentious characters. How can people swoon at him?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Deshi)
    Hit the nail on the head here, it's why I'm not a huge fan of his books, nearly all his books have characters with similar voices and plots to some extent as you've mentioned. That same humour that all his main characters have, similar sidekicks to the protagonists etc. He's not that great a writer.
    Definitely; I can just about accept it in Looking for Alaska, seeing as it was his first book.
    But the same thing doesn't work as many times as he's obviously hoping it will - or more accurately, it IS working even though it really shouldn't be.

    I honestly don't know why so many people my age lap it up without questioning the lack of originality.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by VikingLemon)
    This. I hate pretentious characters. How can people swoon at him?
    I think a lot of people were taken by the idea of an intelligent guy making ridiculous improvised love speeches at them, but in all honesty, I have no clue why they put him on a pedestal.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I agree. I read the first couple of chapters and I honestly found it quite patronizing and obnoxious. I felt like the characters were too overworked, like they were trying too hard to be relatable to teenagers.

    Idk, it might just have been me
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ahappydyl)
    I agree. I read the first couple of chapters and I honestly found it quite patronizing and obnoxious. I felt like the characters were too overworked, like they were trying too hard to be relatable to teenagers.

    Idk, it might just have been me
    Accurate! I got so pissed off reading it plus the language was just arrogant! Couldn't understand what was being said most times!:mad:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dijonnay)
    Accurate! I got so pissed off reading it plus the language was just arrogant! Couldn't understand what was being said most times!:mad:
    It really was. The characters were far from their charming descriptions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lolarose8)
    I have never come across teens that spout long sophisticated monologues in the middle of conversations, therefore I found it a little hard to connect with the characters. I also found them a little to pretentious and try hard; but john green does seem to have a way with words.
    Totally agree with this. If some guy started talking to me the way Augustus did i would be like wut pls stop.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ahappydyl)
    It really was. The characters were far from their charming descriptions.
    So true!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I don't see the appeal either. But that's more due to his writing style, I couldn't get into the book.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I thought the book was pretty fun.

    It wasn't very deep or sophisticated, but I liked the use of language.

    No, it's not how teenagers talk. The dialogues are much more beautiful than what most dialogues between teenagers sound like.

    And I'm truly grateful for that. If he made Hazel and Augustus talk like how teenagers actually talk, it would have been a very boring book (just look at the "Chat" forum on TSR).

    That said, I think I enjoyed his other books more - Looking for Alaska and Paper Towns.

    (not An Abundance of Katherines... that's just silly)
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.