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    (Original post by longsightdon)
    Is university chemistry a massive step up from a level? And how much is the workload per week? Thanks
    I'd say so, yeah. A level Chemistry is so simplified that I feel like it doesn't prepare you for university chemistry. The step up from A level to first year isn't too bad but from the sounds of it the gap between first and second year is large. I'm not sure what you mean by the second question?

    (Original post by ChemistryLover97)
    Which year are you in? Also which other unis did you look at?

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    Starting second year this October. I applied to Oxford, Manchester, Nottingham and Southampton.
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    I'd say so, yeah. A level Chemistry is so simplified that I feel like it doesn't prepare you for university chemistry. The step up from A level to first year isn't too bad but from the sounds of it the gap between first and second year is large. I'm not sure what you mean by the second question?


    Starting second year this October. I applied to Oxford, Manchester, Nottingham and Southampton.
    Hi, by workload, I mean like hours spent at lectures, labs... self study etc
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    I'd say so, yeah. A level Chemistry is so simplified that I feel like it doesn't prepare you for university chemistry. The step up from A level to first year isn't too bad but from the sounds of it the gap between first and second year is large. I'm not sure what you mean by the second question?


    Starting second year this October. I applied to Oxford, Manchester, Nottingham and Southampton.
    Is there anything you would recommend doing to help prepare? I’m doing the chemistry olympiad next year, which has really helped so far
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    (Original post by longsightdon)
    Hi, by workload, I mean like hours spent at lectures, labs... self study etc
    You have about 11 hours of lectures (excluding optional units), an hour of tutorial, and you spend three hours in labs in your first year. It doesn't seem like a lot but we go through the material really quickly so you can fall behind easily.

    (Original post by ChemistryLover97)
    Is there anything you would recommend doing to help prepare? I’m doing the chemistry olympiad next year, which has really helped so far
    Hmm, I'd say brush up on your maths before you start uni. You do a lot maths in your first year (in Bristol anyway).
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    You have about 11 hours of lectures (excluding optional units), an hour of tutorial, and you spend three hours in labs in your first year. It doesn't seem like a lot but we go through the material really quickly so you can fall behind easily.


    Hmm, I'd say brush up on your maths before you start uni. You do a lot maths in your first year (in Bristol anyway).
    How difficult is the maths compared to A Level?

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    (Original post by ChemistryLover97)
    How difficult is the maths compared to A Level?

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    Personally I would say the maths is a lot tougher than A level. The concepts are the same and they don't teach a whole load of new stuff (unless you didnt do further maths). What makes it difficult is that they put it in a chemical context which can make it difficult to understand. It's easier to explain with a demonstration so I have (hopefully) attached a sample question. (i said hopefully as I'm on my phone and TSR is a bit dodgy on my phone).

    If you have a look at question 8 it looks horribly complicated but it is just in fact a simple differentiation question.
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    Personally I would say the maths is a lot tougher than A level. The concepts are the same and they don't teach a whole load of new stuff (unless you didnt do further maths). What makes it difficult is that they put it in a chemical context which can make it difficult to understand. It's easier to explain with a demonstration so I have (hopefully) attached a sample question. (i said hopefully as I'm on my phone and TSR is a bit dodgy on my phone).

    If you have a look at question 8 it looks horribly complicated but it is just in fact a simple differentiation question.
    Yeah that does look horrid :L no, don’t do further maths but am pretty good at maths generally predicted an A* in normal maths, so hopefully manageable

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    (Original post by ChemistryLover97)
    Yeah that does look horrid :L no, don’t do further maths but am pretty good at maths generally predicted an A* in normal maths, so hopefully manageable

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    That's good, you should be fine then
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    Personally I would say the maths is a lot tougher than A level. The concepts are the same and they don't teach a whole load of new stuff (unless you didnt do further maths). What makes it difficult is that they put it in a chemical context which can make it difficult to understand. It's easier to explain with a demonstration so I have (hopefully) attached a sample question. (i said hopefully as I'm on my phone and TSR is a bit dodgy on my phone).

    If you have a look at question 8 it looks horribly complicated but it is just in fact a simple differentiation question.
    So just dI/dr ?

    I/I0 = R x sin^2(theta)/ r^2

    I0 is a constant right, initial intensity? And R is also a constant.

    I/I0 = R . 1/r^2 . (1- cos2theta)/2
    I/I0 = R/2 (1/r^2 . 1 - cos2theta)

    then differentiate? Using implicit and product or?
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    Personally I would say the maths is a lot tougher than A level. The concepts are the same and they don't teach a whole load of new stuff (unless you didnt do further maths). What makes it difficult is that they put it in a chemical context which can make it difficult to understand. It's easier to explain with a demonstration so I have (hopefully) attached a sample question. (i said hopefully as I'm on my phone and TSR is a bit dodgy on my phone).

    If you have a look at question 8 it looks horribly complicated but it is just in fact a simple differentiation question.
    Looks like the kind of maths I really love to do. It is, actually, very similar to the American style of maths exam questions.


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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So just dI/dr ?

    I/I0 = R x sin^2(theta)/ r^2

    I0 is a constant right, initial intensity? And R is also a constant.

    I/I0 = R . 1/r^2 . (1- cos2theta)/2
    I/I0 = R/2 (1/r^2 . 1 - cos2theta)

    then differentiate? Using implicit and product or?
    You've gone very far from the answer. I think you're overcomplicating it a little.

    (Original post by William Turtle)
    Looks like the kind of maths I really love to do. It is, actually, very similar to the American style of maths exam questions.


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    It's tedious at first but once you do a couple you get the hang of it and it's actually cool how they can put stuff like vectors and complex numbers into a chemical context
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    You've gone very far from the answer. I think you're overcomplicating it a little.


    It's tedious at first but once you do a couple you get the hang of it and it's actually cool how they can put stuff like vectors and complex numbers into a chemical context
    It’s one reason I enjoy chemistry at the moment (well A2 stuff anyway), I love Maths
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    You've gone very far from the answer. I think you're overcomplicating it a little.


    It's tedious at first but once you do a couple you get the hang of it and it's actually cool how they can put stuff like vectors and complex numbers into a chemical context
    So not differentiating it lol
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So not differentiating it lol
    Yeah it is...
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    (Original post by InadequateJusticex)
    Yeah it is...
    So where Did it go wrong?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So where Did it go wrong?
    No need to turn the sin squared into 1 - cos squared phi. And you're only differentiating with respect to r.
 
 
 
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