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"Literally" Watch

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    (Original post by 8472)
    I have seen like lots more people use it. Like I don't know why.
    And the use of the word 'like' very other word! Haha I hope you posted that for effect


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    (Original post by KMUequine)
    And the use of the word 'like' very other word! Haha I hope you posted that for effect


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    Yes. I did specifically post to have that effect. :laugh:
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    Damn grammar nazis. :fuhrer::fuhrer:
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    (Original post by 8472)
    Yes. I did specifically post to have that effect. :laugh:
    Thank god I was worried for the generation there. I am guilty of using the work like from time to time but it's probably the most used word in the dictionary right now!


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    But it produces such hilarious sentences as: "I was literally glued to my seat." and "He literally blew up in my face." How can you not like that?
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    I fear I'm turning into one of those 'satanic' people who use literally in contexts it should not be used in.

    Eitherway, I heard from someone a couple of weeks ago that the definiton of 'literally' has been altered in the dictionary, so that it can now be used as emphasis. I have no idea whether this is true or not. I don't enjoying reading the dictionary.
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    (Original post by Dani California)
    Damn grammar nazis. :fuhrer::fuhrer:
    Did I say I cry myself to sleep at night over the use of 'literally'?
    Or go around correcting people every time I hear it?

    No. It's an observation, so be quiet, instead of using a phrase (we've heard a million times) in search of rep.
    Do I care enough to try to stop other people from using it? Not at all. I just think it dumbs down whatever they're trying to communicate.
    Do I care enough to remind my younger siblings to stop using it? Yes.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    it is physically impossible to talk without using either filler words or just leaving


    big


    gaps

    in the middle of


    sentences.
    Gaps sound much better than using words such as "like" or saying "em".
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    (Original post by EatAndRevise)
    Gaps sound much better than using words such as "like" or saying "em".

    Yes but as I explained, if you leave gaps people assume you've finished speaking and so jump in half way through your sentence, so you need to use some kind of signal to indicate you're still talking. Filler words are the most effective way of doing this.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Yes but as I explained, if you leave gaps people assume you've finished speaking and so jump in half way through your sentence, so you need to use some kind of signal to indicate you're still talking. Filler words are the most effective way of doing this.
    Saying "like" takes about one second to say, and having a gap instead of the "like" is completely reasonable.
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    I've tried to stop using literally, unless whatever I described did actually happen.

    Also, if people keep abusing the word literally, respond with sentences containing "metaphorically" :cool:
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    This OP was literally too long. Did not read.
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    Literally in the heart of Jesus.
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    This comic puts everything into perspective: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/literally
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    (Original post by Anonymous Coward)
    Did I say I cry myself to sleep at night over the use of 'literally'?
    Or go around correcting people every time I hear it?

    No. It's an observation, so be quiet, instead of using a phrase (we've heard a million times) in search of rep.
    Do I care enough to try to stop other people from using it? Not at all. I just think it dumbs down whatever they're trying to communicate.
    Do I care enough to remind my younger siblings to stop using it? Yes.
    Oh my God, I was kidding, chill the **** out. And don't you dare tell me to shut up, not unless you want me to keep talking.
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    (Original post by Dani California)
    Oh my God, I was kidding, chill the **** out. And don't you dare tell me to shut up, not unless you want me to keep talking.
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    (Original post by EatAndRevise)
    "Literally" should only be used when the subject being described actually happened.

    For example:

    I literally drank four litres of water last night.

    For this case, unless four litres of water was actually drunk, "literally" should not be used. "Figuratively" should be used.
    Nope. The Oxford Dictionary has been updated and now literally means both what you described and as a way of exaggerating a certain situation so as to emphasise it
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    (Original post by Anonymous Coward)
    Obviously these days (I don't know for how long it's been this way; I haven't really paid attention) the word "Literally" can be used informally for emphasis:

    "I have received literally thousands of letters"

    And though it rarely adds anything meaningful to the sentence (for example "I'm literally starving" - you might as well take the "literally" out, as the "starving" says enough on it's own. Same for "I've literally been dead on my feet all day") It's pretty much accepted that lots of people (especially young people) will use it that way.

    But has anyone else noticed it's now just becoming a filler word for a lot of people?
    "I'm literally so hungry" for example.
    I only noticed a couple of weeks ago, but literally everyone (see what I did there?
    ) is doing it.

    People think this is the universal word to replace words like "basically".
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    (Original post by Luminz)
    Nope. The Oxford Dictionary has been updated and now literally means both what you described and as a way of exaggerating a certain situation so as to emphasise it
    I do not believe it is correct, the only reason it has been updated is because teenage girls do not know what the true definition of "literally" is, and therefore, it has been overused and misused. It may have changed in the dictionary but I am not willing to accept the new definition.
 
 
 
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