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JK Rowling writes new 1,500 word Harry Potter story Watch

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    I read the story, but it was written from Rita Skeeter's point of view (it's a newspaper article) so it's not really a big deal because Rowling's already done tons of newspaper articles for Pottermore before apparently (this one just happened to feature the Potter family).

    I also agree that Dumbledore shouldn't have been revealed to be gay, it just put an unneeded human twist on his kind of grandfatherly all-knowing image. There wasn't much of a gap between Dumbledore, Gandalf and Merlin until it was revealed that he was gay, and though he's still one of the most notable wizards in fiction the idea of him ever loving Grindelwald etc. just distracts from the true and important reason of their temporary relationship (temptation, corruption, good vs evil, greater good etc.) and that has widened the gap between him and the others. Suggesting that Dumbledore is gay makes it look like he only went along with Grindelwald because he fancied him as opposed to going along with him because he himself was not strong enough to avoid the allure of the Deathly Hallows. If Gandalf had refused to take the ring because it turns out he was gay and used to fancy Sauron as opposed to fearing what he might become with that sort of power then that would ruin his image too and I would be equally critical of Tolkien. It wasn't a smart choice on Rowling's part really. That's just my two cents anyway :moon:
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Dumbledore had always been given a human side. When he talked to Harry about setting fire to his dormitory curtains, making a mistake when appointing Lockhart, accepting Tom Riddle into Hogwarts despite his background and behaviour, being angry with Harry out of care when demanding if he put his name in the Triwizard Cup, not letting Umbridge kick Trelawney out of Hogwarts, wearing Gaunt's ring, thinking the fake locket was real and drinking the Drink of Despair, I could go on. Giving him a sexuality further showed that he was just as human as the rest of the world.
    All those things you've mentioned are evidence of Dumbledore showing his good morality, his forgiveness and his aim to teach these lessons to Harry. For me that still places him in a role of a holy-like figure, always acting to do what is right and good. For example, if he started to be swayed by desires, such as money & possessions, instead of acting morally, then this would have made him more human as we all are. But the fact that he always chooses good, for me, places him still up there as being god-like rather than a human.
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    I've heard so many religious people complaining about Dumbledore being gay and how it isn't right for a film that kids can watch.
    Religious people
    complaining about a film
    that includes magic/witchcraft/wizardry
    and they only complain about sexuality rather than the fact it's about MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT?! I guess this just follows the 'pick and choose which parts of the religion to follow which suit my needs' mentality.
    '“A man or a woman who is a medium or a necromancer shall surely be put to death. They shall be stoned with stones; their blood shall be upon them.”
    "
    “You shall not permit a sorceress to live."
    "
    And a number of those who had practiced magic arts brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all. And they counted the value of them and found it came to fifty thousand pieces of silver."
    "
    “Do not turn to mediums or necromancers; do not seek them out, and so make yourselves unclean by them: I am the Lord your God."
    "
    And a number of those who had practiced magic arts brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all. And they counted the value of them and found it came to fifty thousand pieces of silver. So the word of the Lord continued to increase and prevail mightily."
    "
    "Avoid the seven deadly acts which are: ascribing partners to God, magic, killing the human self which Allah prohibited except with right, eating usury, devouring the orphan's wealth, defecting from the battle-field (without a justified reason) and slandering chaste, unwary believing women. Thus Islam has closed the door for practicing magic, simply because it is against its teachings, and it is deceptive and harmful."
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    (Original post by Luminz)
    Dumbledore is gay makes it look like he only went along with Grindelwald because he fancied him as opposed to going along with him because he himself was not strong enough to avoid the allure of the Deathly Hallows.
    That's the whole point; he was never interested in the hallows and being the master of death. He gave the cloak to Harry, put the stone in the snitch and yes he possessed the elder wand, but not because it was a hallow. He only went along with Grindelwald and considered practising the dark arts out of love, not because he wanted the hallows. He knew what the hallows were and giving away two of them shows he never wanted to control them; he was strong enough to avoid the allure and he did. His love for Grindelwald indirectly caused the death of his sister, showing how his love for one impacted on his love for another.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    That's the whole point; he was never interested in the hallows and being the master of death. He gave the cloak to Harry, put the stone in the snitch and yes he possessed the elder wand, but not because it was a hallow. He only went along with Grindelwald and considered practising the dark arts out of love, not because he wanted the hallows. He knew what the hallows were and giving always two of them shows he never wanted to control them; he was strong enough to avoid the allure and he did. His love for Grindelwald indirectly caused the death of his sister, showing how his love for one impacted on his love for another.
    Er no, he went along with Grindelwald because he started believing in the good he could do by possessing the Hallows, not because he fancied him. There is no way Dumbledore would be such a champion of love if the biggest mistake he made in his life resulted purely from being in love. It may have been a factor, as Rowling suggests by telling everyone his sexuality, but it's not the ultimate reason, otherwise she would have made it explicit in the books that he did it because he was gay. She did not do that, and Dumbledore is not infalliable as you believe. He didn't resist the allure and as a result of that his sister died.

    "In his youth, Albus Dumbledore, along with soon-to-become Dark Wizard Gellert Grindelwald, entertained dreams of finding and appropriating the Hallows for himself. This quest for power also manifested itself in his vision of a future where wizards would rule over and control Muggles "for the greater good". A family argument later caused him to revise and reconsider his beliefs after the death of his sister.[2] Up until his death, he never trusted himself with power, refusing the post of Minister for Magic three times - yet his yearning to find the Hallows never left him."

    In other words, you're the one who has got it backwards.
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    (Original post by i-love-coffee)
    All those things you've mentioned are evidence of Dumbledore showing his good morality, his forgiveness and his aim to teach these lessons to Harry. For me that still places him in a role of a holy-like figure, always acting to do what is right and good. For example, if he started to be swayed by desires, such as money & possessions, instead of acting morally, then this would have made him more human as we all are. But the fact that he always chooses good, for me, places him still up there as being god-like rather than a human.
    Morality is separate from mistakes, which Dumbledore made plenty of. Holy and god-like figures would not make as many human mistakes as Dumbledore did. Wanting money and desires are only parts of being human.
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    (Original post by Luminz)
    Er no, he went along with Grindelwald because he started believing in the good he could do by possessing the Hallows, not because he fancied him. There is no way Dumbledore would be such a champion of love if the biggest mistake he made in his life resulted purely from being in love. It may have been a factor, as Rowling suggests by telling everyone his sexuality, but it's not the ultimate reason, otherwise she would have made it explicit in the books that he did it because he was gay. She did not do that, and Dumbledore is not infalliable as you believe. He didn't resist the allure and as a result of that his sister died.

    "In his youth, Albus Dumbledore, along with soon-to-become Dark Wizard Gellert Grindelwald, entertained dreams of finding and appropriating the Hallows for himself. This quest for power also manifested itself in his vision of a future where wizards would rule over and control Muggles "for the greater good". A family argument later caused him to revise and reconsider his beliefs after the death of his sister.[2] Up until his death, he never trusted himself with power, refusing the post of Minister for Magic three times - yet his yearning to find the Hallows never left him."

    In other words, you're the one who has got it backwards.
    Would he have actually been seeking the hallows with Grindelwald if he was not in love with him? I don't see anything that says Dumbledore wanted the hallows when Grindelwald was not involved. To me it seems that he was influenced by Grindelwald so much that he would do anything to be with him, even convincing himself to do the things you've quoted, his mind being manipulated by Grindelwald, taking advantage of Dumbledore's love.

    I've never said Dumbledore was infallible; I've mentioned his many mistakes numerous times in this thread.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Would he have actually been seeking the hallows with Grindelwald if he was not in love with him? I don't see anything that says Dumbledore wanted the hallows when Grindelwald was not involved. To me it seems that he was influenced by Grindelwald so much that he would do anything to be with him, even convincing himself to do the things you've quoted, his mind being manipulated by Grindelwald, taking advantage of Dumbledore's love.

    I've never said Dumbledore was infallible; I've mentioned his many mistakes numerous times in this thread.
    "The two made plans to find the Deathly Hallows and wield their new-found power as Masters of Death, leading a Wizarding revolution with the aim of ending the International Statute of Secrecy and creating a benevolent global order led by wise and powerful witches and wizards. Their partnership fell apart after the two were involved in a three-way duel with Aberforth Dumbledore that resulted in Ariana Dumbledore's death."

    Pretty sure he wouldn't agree to all that if he was merely in love, he had to have some desire of his own, and Dumbledore says himself in the King's Cross chapter in Deathly Hallows that he was obssessed with the Hallows. It absolutely is not because he was gay and wanted to please his boyfriend, sorry.

    To suggest that he only made mistakes out of being in love rather than being tempted by power downplays his wrong-doings because people do stupid things when they're in love and so you tend to forgive them. Fact is he craved power in his youth like Grindelwald did, and only realised his mistake after he'd lost his sister. If he only made mistakes from being in love then I don't really see why he would have refused the position of Minister for Magic, he would have been able to do more good in that position than anyone, but from the books it looks like he didn't trust himself after having had a taste of power previously and seeing where it got him.

    Edit - Oh, and again, he wouldn't be such a champion of love if all his mistakes came from falling in love.
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    I was most annoyed when various ignorant news outlets reported she was doing a new book causing people to go 'she's milking it' when it was a filthy lie.

    She's done short stories before from Harry Potter. It's a nice way to revisit the universe without getting sick of it. It doesn't ruin it, it just fleshes out small details about the future lives of characters. It's also worth noting that she tells the story from different characters in these short stories. I think that's unique enough and is fine.

    I haven't read the new one, hopefully someone will copypasta it for me as I haven't got a Pottermore account.
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    Dumbledore being gay ruined the books?
    How?
    Spoiled my memories of the books. I really hate authors revealing stuff about literary characters outside of the literature itself - sorry.
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    I like hearing about them. Because remember, J.K Rowling created a whole world rather than just some stories about a wizard boy. I enjoyed hearing about the history of the wizarding world through J.K's new pieces that's she puts into various chapters on Pottermore. I also like hearing her thoughts on her decisions, and the regrets she had that she often signs these pieces off with. To me, hearing more about Harry and his friends just expands the world. There was a world before Harry, so we've heard about that. They grew up, so it only makes sense to hear what happens AFTER them.

    And she is the author. If she wants people to know that Dumbledore was gay, she can very well can! It's her story and her fictional world. I liked to know that Dumbledore was gay. He was human, and I never saw him anything other than that. He made human mistakes, he made human relationships! And the reason you all see him as wise is because of these mistakes he made. He's allowed to have a sexuality because he isn't a "God" and never has been. I like her reminder that even the wise and successful have their own desires and regrets.
    In the mirror of Erised chapter, he told Harry he saw himself with socks. I think she made it clear that he was lying. The only person I think that would see themselves with socks is Dobby. He may have seen Grindelwald, if that's what you believe. I personally think it makes sense. :dontknow:

    But of course, if you just want the books to be the books, with no expansions or anything, then you're free to think of it like that. It's a bit boring, but your imagination to do with as you please.
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    I like how this has just turned into a debate about Dumbledore :lol:
    (Original post by Numberwang)
    Spoiled my memories of the books. I really hate authors revealing stuff about literary characters outside of the literature itself - sorry.
    I agree with this - his sexuality doesn't matter in the slightest, what bugged me was that Rowling felt the need to point it out. I think once you've written something, it should be left alone. She wrote it in a certain way, meaning that there were aspects left open to interpretation, I don't understand then going back and being like "oh, this is what I meant when I said this..." I just don't think it's necessary.

    I think it's the same kind of concept with her writing new stories. Writing about the same characters just seems so obvious, even if it is looking at where they are now.
    I love the books, but I think the series ended in the right place. I think I'd prefer just imagining where the characters are now
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    The only thing about Dumbledore is that it's kinda like talking about a grandparent's sex life... if you thought about it then yeah, it probably exists. But we don't necessarily need to hear about it. But I never got THAT into HP, so it's not as weird for me.
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    Personally, I think J.K. Rowling can say whatever she likes about her characters in interviews etc. but if the information wasn't included in the books themselves, then it doesn't count. It's something that's just left to the reader's interpretation and imagination.

    In that regard, I think it's better that we don't know what Dumbledore's sexuality was. We read the books mainly from Harry's point of view, who is never really supposed to see Dumbledore from that angle. It's similar to how, though Harry at one point wonders where Dumbledore goes during the summer holidays and pictures him lying around on a beach somewhere, he never actually finds out. It's not really any of his business, nor is it any of ours.

    Besides, the story stands just fine either way, regardless of what Dumbledore's sexuality was (unlike say, Snape, who has to be straight for the story to make sense). I personally always thought of Dumbledore and Grindelwald's relationship to be similar to Charles Xavier's relationship with Magneto in X-Men. There doesn't have to be anything sexual about it. And even if there is, we don't need to know about it.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    Oh please. Dumbledore was intended as the ideal good wizard, not as a paragon of excellence for gays. And they hardly face an "enormous amount of discrimination" in becoming successful.
    Urm yes they sort of do. There is a tremendous amout of homophobia amongst the powerful, almost all CEOs are conservative as we know at that level it is all about connections so if you don't have any connections as a result of prejudice how are you supposed to succeed in that career. To conclude what you said was a bald-faced lie.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Personally, I think J.K. Rowling can say whatever she likes about her characters in interviews etc. but if the information wasn't included in the books themselves, then it doesn't count. It's something that's just left to the reader's interpretation and imagination.

    In that regard, I think it's better that we don't know what Dumbledore's sexuality was. We read the books mainly from Harry's point of view, who is never really supposed to see Dumbledore from that angle. It's similar to how, though Harry at one point wonders where Dumbledore goes during the summer holidays and pictures him lying around on a beach somewhere, he never actually finds out. It's not really any of his business, nor is it any of ours.

    Besides, the story stands just fine either way, regardless of what Dumbledore's sexuality was (unlike say, Snape, who has to be straight for the story to make sense). I personally always thought of Dumbledore and Grindelwald's relationship to be similar to Charles Xavier's relationship with Magneto in X-Men. There doesn't have to be anything sexual about it. And even if there is, we don't need to know about it.
    This! I was thinking exactly that type of relationship, but couldn't find the right words for it. OK, you can read it as a gay relationship, but I see it more as two excelling wizards, who find they are peers and who wan't originally to do the best thing for their race (wizards/mutants), but one realizes the other takes it too far and then backs out. Thank you for providing me with the perfect parallel
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    (Original post by slg60)
    Urm yes they sort of do. There is a tremendous amout of homophobia amongst the powerful, almost all CEOs are conservative as we know at that level it is all about connections so if you don't have any connections as a result of prejudice how are you supposed to succeed in that career. To conclude what you said was a bald-faced lie.
    These are opinions, not facts. Besides which, legislation is in place to prevent prejudice, and I don't see how one's sexuality would be relevant in the office.
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    Grey hairs at 33 seems a little unusual. Perhaps Rowling has a problem?
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    (Original post by i-love-coffee)
    All those things you've mentioned are evidence of Dumbledore showing his good morality, his forgiveness and his aim to teach these lessons to Harry. For me that still places him in a role of a holy-like figure, always acting to do what is right and good. For example, if he started to be swayed by desires, such as money & possessions, instead of acting morally, then this would have made him more human as we all are. But the fact that he always chooses good, for me, places him still up there as being god-like rather than a human.
    You can be good and human. I do not believe that Jesus was the son of God. But I do however, that he was a real person and that he did good things. He always chose good, that does not make him god-like.
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    After reading all of the posts so far, I have one question that I think everyone should consider, (please don't reply to the first part of this post, it's just something I observed)

    The Question:

    Why are you all focusing on Dumbledore, who died in book 6, when the actual story that JK wrote was about the Potters and Quiddich World Cup?


    I fully embrace the fact that if people feel that they want to have a relationship with someone of the same gender, they should go for it. My only problem is when they say that they are a member of a religion that strictly preaches against it, because personally I think that you are betraying your religion.

    Harry Potter is an amazing series of books and films, and the people that try to pick holes through the plots of each book need to remember that no book is perfect, and that they should respect the fact that whilst they might not like Harry Potter millions of people do, and should keep quite, as we don't judge you on the books that you read.
 
 
 
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