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Hobnobbing with the working classes Watch

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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    A vastly oversimplified definition.

    Temporary jobs clearly don't count, else people would be changing their class every 5 minutes.
    I'm sorry, find me a definition which can back up his claim he is middle class.

    Let's not exaggerate this. Currently he is at the level of a working class person and no more.

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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    I'm VERY working class, let me tell you about me.

    Swear sometimes yeah. (sometimes quite a lot, also use a fair bit of slang/socialect)
    Don't watch TV often, unless it's doctor who or something good.
    Don't drink.
    Don't gamble.
    Hate watching football, do play it though. Read the Guardian and the Economist and scientific papers.
    Eat good my mum makes every day, around 5 times a day
    No tattoos and no tan.
    I don't think I have a Mancunian accent or any regional accent to be honest.
    Wear whatever I like, sometimes it's Primark, sometimes it's designer and sometimes it has no label (sometimes hand made stuff )
    Cheapish car, have a garden which my dad and sister like to keep in shape.

    Most of my friends are working class and are very similar (admittedly these are not native Brits, most are immigrants, which I think will have an effect.)

    Your anecdotal evidence has no value.

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    Anyway, all my "anecdotal evidence" does is simply agree with what the data actually shows. The working classes DO gamble more, they DO smoke more, they DO eat more takeaways, they DO watch more tv, they DO favour football over rugby etc etc etc.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    I'm not sure what point OP is trying to make, but his observations are reasonably accurate.

    I spend about half my time with working class people on a council estate and half with middle class people in a posh english village.

    The working class people

    swear constantly
    watch the telly
    drink lager
    gamble
    watch football
    read the sun
    eat mainly takeaways
    have tattoos and spray tan
    talk in thick regional accents
    wear clothes with labels
    have expensive cars but no gardens

    The middle class people
    don't swear
    listen to the radio/read books
    drink red wine or real ale
    watch rugby
    read the times
    eat homecooked food
    talk in plummy RP
    wear clothes without labels
    have cheap cars, but big gardens


    These are stereotypes, but theres a lot of truth to them to.
    The last two claims are rather false, indeed most of the claims are far-fetched. One must consider that there are middle-class people all around the country and these claims obviously do not apply to the majority of them. In saying that, a lot of the claims are viable for the middle-class.
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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    I'm sorry, find me a definition which can back up his claim he is middle class.

    Let's not exaggerate this. Currently he is at the level of a working class person and no more.

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    A middle class person does not become working class simply because he temporarily takes a waged job, in the same way that a working class person does not magically become upper class just because he won the lottery.
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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    I'm sorry, find me a definition which can back up his claim he is middle class.

    Let's not exaggerate this. Currently he is at the level of a working class person and no more.

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    That is incorrect, many people work in shops and are most definitely not working-class. For example: the neighbourhood I am situated in has a variety of shops, and obviously employees of said shops, many of whom are middle-class.
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    (Original post by EatAndRevise)
    I do not entirely agree with that statement, employees at Waitrose are most definitely not working-class.
    they are not called employees they are called partners :mob:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    they are not called employees they are called partners :mob:
    I have made a terrible mistake, I am sorry. Appropriate changes will be made :ashamed2:
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    A middle class person does not become working class simply because he temporarily takes a waged job, in the same way that a working class person does not magically become upper class just because he won the lottery.
    The definition I've given would imply they do.

    Anyway, you have given some extremes. Fact is if you work for a wage you are working class by most definitions, at the time you are working. Ever heard of Social Mobility

    Now if a working class person stops working after they have won the lottery while they may still have working class views and beliefs they are not working class themselves

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    (Original post by 122025278)
    I could go on and on. It's just been such an eye opener to me, a BBC 2 viewing, non-Poundland frequenting, Russell Group educated lad from the leafy suburbs.
    lel
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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    The definition I've given would imply they do.

    Anyway, you have given some extremes. Fact is if you work for a wage you are working class by most definitions, at the time you are working. Ever heard of Social Mobility

    Now if a working class person stops working after they have won the lottery while they may still have working class views and beliefs they are not working class themselves

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    But no definition says that if you work for a wage you are working class. They all say that if you come from the social class that works for a wage, you are working class, which is something completely different.

    Your definition is not the academic definition used by sociologists. I think you just misunderstood wikipedia, that's why you're confused.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    But no definition says that if you work for a wage you are working class. They all say that if you come from the social class that works for a wage, you are working class, which is something completely different.

    Your definition is not the academic definition used by sociologists. I think you just misunderstood wikipedia, that's why you're confused.
    Wage does have a say in it, on the official BBC class test, wage is a key part to determining one's class. The gentleman you are arguing with is wrong, you are right.
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    (Original post by Mubariz)
    The definition I've given would imply they do.

    Anyway, you have given some extremes. Fact is if you work for a wage you are working class by most definitions, at the time you are working. Ever heard of Social Mobility

    Now if a working class person stops working after they have won the lottery while they may still have working class views and beliefs they are not working class themselves

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    "Fact is if you work for a wage you are working class by most definitions, at the time you are working."

    That is wrong.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    But no definition says that if you work for a wage you are working class. They all say that if you come from the social class that works for a wage, you are working class, which is something completely different.

    Your definition is not the academic definition used by sociologists. I think you just misunderstood wikipedia, that's why you're confused.
    So basically you are saying there is no definition that supports what you say, but you are still right?

    I understand it is not, but it is the generally accepted one and that is the one that really matters because class is really just a social constructed by humans and it would make sense that the definition accepted by most people be the "correct" one.

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    Sorry - I have closed this thread due to the large volume of posts deemed inappropriate.
 
 
 
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