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Hard life in UK. How do you feel? Watch

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    I'm supportive of the government's efforts to cut cost and stop the ever ballooning size of the state. I'm not in principle against higher wages but before that can happen there must be a significant increase in productivity and quality to which much of the state sector are simply rubbish at and that includes teachers too.
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    (Original post by Moosferatu)
    Pfft, the average fireman does a far more dangerous job and is worth far more than your average bitter private sector desk jockey.
    But they volunteered for it, no-one told them they had to be a fireman. No-one press ganged them into it. They knew it was public service, they know the type of politicians that run the country (because they're always the same, regardless of party), they knew the risks.

    Same goes for NHS, Police and Armed Forces.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    You would be horrified if you knew the kind of money tube staff are on for holidays and special events.
    I'm prepared to listen to the horrifying news; do tell.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    They don't get any from me.

    My plan would be to invest multiple billions in a secret state of the art tube training facility in Eastern Europe, and train an Army of fully qualified drivers and station staff, then go to war with the RMT and starve them out. Break the unions for once and for all, regardless of the cost. You would be horrified if you knew the kind of money tube staff are on for holidays and special events.
    Good luck breaking the unions and sending British wages and working conditions on a race to the bottom. It's no surprise loads of people who would actually benefit this country are fleeing to the former colonies and Europe were prospects are better, leaving behind the unfortunate to be ruled by the sociopathic.

    (Original post by Drewski)
    But they volunteered for it, no-one told them they had to be a fireman. No-one press ganged them into it. They knew it was public service, they know the type of politicians that run the country (because they're always the same, regardless of party), they knew the risks.

    Same goes for NHS, Police and Armed Forces.
    So they should just roll over and let the deal they signed up for go away? What happens when the next time rolls around and the government decides to put them on minimum wage? What happens when firemen, soldiers, and police (although not particularly good ones) are ten-a-penny because there is no work and employees "should be lucky" for a job with a poor wage and terrible working conditions? Is that the kind of state we're all looking forward to?
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    (Original post by Moosferatu)
    So they should just roll over and let the deal they signed up for go away? What happens when the next time rolls around and the government decides to put them on minimum wage? What happens when firemen, soldiers, and police (although not particularly good ones) are ten-a-penny because there is no work and employees "should be lucky" for a job with a poor wage and terrible working conditions? Is that the kind of state we're all looking forward to?
    There has to be an acceptance that things change, most Unions seem utterly oblivious of that fact.

    It's worth noting, too, that of those mentioned, neither the Police nor the Armed Forces are legally allowed Unions nor are they legally allowed to strike, yet their pay and pension schemes are relatively stable. So who's failing who?
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I'm prepared to listen to the horrifying news; do tell.
    During the Olympics it was something like £400 per shift extra for station staff, more for drivers. New Years Eve is much higher. The Year 2000 NYE had people on over £1000 extra for the shift.

    They also got a bonus just for not striking during the Olympics.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    During the Olympics it was something like £400 per shift extra for station staff, more for drivers. New Years Eve is much higher. The Year 2000 NYE had people on over £1000 extra for the shift.

    They also got a bonus just for not striking during the Olympics.
    I think I've went to the wrong job sector then.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    There has to be an acceptance that things change, most Unions seem utterly oblivious of that fact.

    It's worth noting, too, that of those mentioned, neither the Police nor the Armed Forces are legally allowed Unions nor are they legally allowed to strike, yet their pay and pension schemes are relatively stable. So who's failing who?
    Things certainly are changing - for the average citizen, things are getting worse and worse, and are going to continue declining. For all their flaws, unions are part of a force that actually stands up for decent work and pay conditions amidst this tide of neoliberal guff.

    The paramilitary police and the army need to be kept on side, they'll be essential in curbing the upcoming social unrest and breaking the will of the average citizen.
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    (Original post by Moosferatu)
    Things certainly are changing - for the average citizen, things are getting worse and worse, and are going to continue declining. For all their flaws, unions are part of a force that actually stands up for decent work and pay conditions amidst this tide of neoliberal guff.

    The paramilitary police and the army need to be kept on side, they'll be essential in curbing the upcoming social unrest and breaking the will of the average citizen.
    The average citizen doesn't work in the public sector and is regularly being held to ransom by those who are.

    And I have no time for the conspiracy BS about some apocalyptic future where the army holds court.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    The average citizen doesn't work in the public sector and is regularly being held to ransom by those who are.

    And I have no time for the conspiracy BS about some apocalyptic future where the army holds court.
    Then it's not a matter of the public sector getting too much - it's a matter of the private sector getting too little. But it's easier to point the finger at another worker than it is to actually understand the bigger picture and the drive to suppress wages.

    The government regularly monitor dissidents, and there's a good reason they're stocking up on water cannons despite the vast majority of the people of London not wanting their city to ape Belfast. We're heading for a bigger repeat of the riots, the questions are when, to what extent, and how many rights are they going to take away from us during the cleanup.
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    (Original post by Moosferatu)
    Then it's not a matter of the public sector getting too much - it's a matter of the private sector getting too little. But it's easier to point the finger at another worker than it is to actually understand the bigger picture and the drive to suppress wages.

    The government regularly monitor dissidents, and there's a good reason they're stocking up on water cannons despite the vast majority of the people of London not wanting their city to ape Belfast. We're heading for a bigger repeat of the riots, the questions are when, to what extent, and how many rights are they going to take away from us during the cleanup.
    London Council [nb, not Government] buying 3 second hand machines can only be considered stocking up if the 4 pack of baked beans in my cupboard is considered stocking up for the zombie apocalypse.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    London Council [nb, not Government] buying 3 second hand machines can only be considered stocking up if the 4 pack of baked beans in my cupboard is considered stocking up for the zombie apocalypse.
    An amusing retort. I can only hope you're right.
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    Life is never hard in the UK.

    It's only relatively 'hard'.

    That said the cuts to public spending and other Tory policies show a sad bias towards those already well off.
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Simply put, the cuts are only doing harm to our economy.

    Our government is making descisions based on bad economics, and running the country into the grund for personal gain and ideological blindness.

    These people have a right to strike, and they are using that right with good judgement. The fact that Cameron and co. are now seeing this and then seeing it as a need to curb the unions, is a good enough reason to strike in the first place!
    Do you realize UK national debt was forecasted to rise to 99% of GDP in 2014? That's the big problem? If you were the UK govt, what would you do to tackle the problem?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...l_Debt.svg.png

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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    Do you realize UK national debt was forecasted to rise to 99% of GDP in 2014? That's the big problem? If you were the UK govt, what would you do to tackle the problem?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...l_Debt.svg.png
    Among other things, crack down on tax evasion and avoidance. Reducing the deficit is irrelevant if you cripple the economy while doing so. Ideally, increasing revenue to match spending would be far better than reducing spending in vital areas.
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Among other things, crack down on tax evasion and avoidance. Reducing the deficit is irrelevant if you cripple the economy while doing so. Ideally, increasing revenue to match spending would be far better than reducing spending in vital areas.
    There are three ways to deal with a deficit/financial crisis:
    1) Increase revenue-increase taxes, very unpopular
    2) Decrease spending-make cuts, also very unpopular
    3) The Labour party way-try to spend your way out of the problem, cocks things up more.

    And, actually, better than increasing revenue to match spending is to make the, as you put it, "vital areas" more efficient so as to reduce the spending, which is partly what's being done.
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Among other things, crack down on tax evasion and avoidance. Reducing the deficit is irrelevant if you cripple the economy while doing so. Ideally, increasing revenue to match spending would be far better than reducing spending in vital areas.
    1. Cracking down on tax evasion is absolutely possible. It's practically not hard. But clamping down on tax avoidance? How? Nuke tax havens such as British Virgin Islands or Cayman Islands?

    2. Increasing revenues meaning someone must pay more taxes? Who? The rich, the middle class,or the working class ? It's impossible for the poor, I think.

    Is it possible some or more of government assets might be sold or rented to increase the revenues?

    Is it possible there might be more investors from other countries? That can help?

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    (Original post by skunkboy)
    2. Increasing revenues meaning someone must pay more taxes? Who? The rich, the middle class,or the working class ? It's impossible for the poor, I think.
    Not necessarily, Nationalized industries with the profits going directly to the government would be one form of extra revenue.

    (Original post by skunkboy)
    Is it possible some or more of government assets might be sold or rented to increase the revenues?
    Selling only provides a short term boost in income, though renting out services would be an interesting idea. I had never thought of it.
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Not necessarily, Nationalized industries-
    :eek:

    OH NO, HERE COMES THE NEOLIBERALS!!!
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    (Original post by Moosferatu)
    :eek:

    OH NO, HERE COMES THE NEOLIBERALS!!!
    :eek:
    Who use American English too D:
 
 
 
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