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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    OP doesn't have a degree, how would he apply for grad entry?

    You can apply to standard courses as a mature student.
    I didn't think they let you apply when mature, to the normal course. I thought that was the primary purpose of graduate entry.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I didn't think they let you apply when mature, to the normal course. I thought that was the primary purpose of graduate entry.
    No, graduate entry is only for those who have already obtained a degree. Many who don't get into medicine first time round tend to do a science-related degree like biomedical science and then try to get in foe graduate medicine, particularly when they may not have had the A-Level grades but ended up getting a 1st in their degree.
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    (Original post by Paralove)
    No, graduate entry is only for those who have already obtained a degree. Many who don't get into medicine first time round tend to do a science-related degree like biomedical science and then try to get in foe graduate medicine, particularly when they may not have had the A-Level grades but ended up getting a 1st in their degree.
    Thanks. So would the normal courses take into consideration my first in my degree, or completely overlook it and simply look at the A level and GCSE results needed?
    I have only really considered graduate entry.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Thanks. So would the normal courses take into consideration my first in my degree, or completely overlook it and simply look at the A level and GCSE results needed?
    I have only really considered graduate entry.
    What is your degree in?
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    (Original post by Paralove)
    What is your degree in?
    Psychology (tailored to neuroscience and health)
    Starting clinical cognitive neuroscience MSc in Sept.
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    i failed my alevels then completed a btec applied science course. i thought no university would take me and i felt so depressed. i was completely honest in my UCAS application and personal statement, i made it clear that i just wasn't in the right state of mind during that time. I got 3 engineering foundation year offers and 1 chemistry 3 year offer. as long as you can explain why you didnt complete your course/ why you failed it shouldnt matter. BE HONEST!!
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    The UK is amazing for giving people a second chance when they fall off the path. Explain yourself and you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Psychology (tailored to neuroscience and health)
    Starting clinical cognitive neuroscience MSc in Sept.
    You should apply for the grad entry, not undergrad. Although you receive the same undergraduate degree from either course, your qualifications mean you should be applying for the graduate one. They will look at your degree classification when making offers for GEM. I don't think they look at GCSE and A-Level, as they are much lower in level, but I'm not entirely sure. You will have to check with the university itself.
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    (Original post by Paralove)
    You should apply for the grad entry, not undergrad. Although you receive the same undergraduate degree from either course, your qualifications mean you should be applying for the graduate one. They will look at your degree classification when making offers for GEM. I don't think they look at GCSE and A-Level, as they are much lower in level, but I'm not entirely sure. You will have to check with the university itself.
    In honesty, assuming that the GEM route is still available after I graduate my MSc in 2 years (perhaps not), I'm still leaning towards the PhD route - just because it's so much cheaper. I could do the PhD (in brain science) where I live; whilst I would have to move to do GEM and the course is 4 years at 9k per year, whilst the PhD is only 3 years and probably a fair bit cheaper yearly.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    In honesty, assuming that the GEM route is still available after I graduate my MSc in 2 years (perhaps not), I'm still leaning towards the PhD route - just because it's so much cheaper. I could do the PhD (in brain science) where I live; whilst I would have to move to do GEM and the course is 4 years at 9k per year, whilst the PhD is only 3 years and probably a fair bit cheaper yearly.
    It just depends whether it gets you into the career you want. I'm not familiar with the routes that are opened with each degree.
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    No they don't, they take whatever is declared on ucas as gospel. Any further qualifications like in the future your going to sit for example this years A-Levels, they get the results from the exam boards. Like for qualifications 10 years ago that i sat, they just accepted them (this is UCL), im talking about here in experience.
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    (Original post by Paralove)
    It just depends whether it gets you into the career you want. I'm not familiar with the routes that are opened with each degree.
    Neurosurgeon would be sweet lol.

    Nah. Well the GEM has good job security as a doc; whilst that of a PhD isn't as much... as it doesn't really specify a certain job.

    Suppose its a slight compromise, usually not earning as much with a PhD. Still hoping to do something clinical though; alongside the docs, nurses, and surgeons etc.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    In honesty, assuming that the GEM route is still available after I graduate my MSc in 2 years (perhaps not), I'm still leaning towards the PhD route - just because it's so much cheaper. I could do the PhD (in brain science) where I live; whilst I would have to move to do GEM and the course is 4 years at 9k per year, whilst the PhD is only 3 years and probably a fair bit cheaper yearly.
    A bit of a general post, as there a a few people posting with comments/questions. Just because you have a degree doesn't necessarily mean you should automatically apply to GEP courses (or certainly not ONLY GEP courses). The competition for GEP courses is a lot higher than for the 5 year, and I mean a LOT higher! However, the funding situation is also significantly different. As a graduate, the 5 year course is 9k a year until the last year, when the NHS pick up some of it. If you apply to the 4 year GEP course, the NHS fund the majority of it for all years.

    The entrance requirements for medicine (4 and 5 year) vary tremendously between medical schools, including requirements for GCSEs, A levels and degree subject. As a graduate, some schools completely ignore GCSEs and/or A levels, some do not. Some specify acceptable degree subjects, some do not. Schools also have varying policies on A level resits. You really do need to contact each school and find out their individual requirements, otherwise you risk your application being rejected at the first pass.



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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Yeah, I know that the vast majority do. But I heard that there was a possibility that they would discontinue the graduate entry programme. I don't know how accurate that is though.

    It's good to know that there are so many graduates doing medicine.
    I know that medicine is undergraduate level; I didn't say otherwise?

    How are you finding medicine? All you expected it to be?
    Yes, realise you didn't say medicine wasn't UG level. Just stating it, as some people get confused with GEP being a graduate level degree.

    I've heard nothing from any med school re: GEP being discontinued. Honestly can't think it likely; however, with the funding pressures in the NHS, the additional funding provided for this route may be more limited in future years, with an increased number of grads applying to the 5 year courses.

    Re your question about the course... I'm loving it!!! Everything I expected it to be, and the best career move I've made (as a somewhat older grad, with a previous career behind me).


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    (Original post by HawkFlight)
    A bit of a general post, as there a a few people posting with comments/questions. Just because you have a degree doesn't necessarily mean you should automatically apply to GEP courses (or certainly not ONLY GEP courses). The competition for GEP courses is a lot higher than for the 5 year, and I mean a LOT higher! However, the funding situation is also significantly different. As a graduate, the 5 year course is 9k a year until the last year, when the NHS pick up some of it. If you apply to the 4 year GEP course, the NHS fund the majority of it for all years.

    The entrance requirements for medicine (4 and 5 year) vary tremendously between medical schools, including requirements for GCSEs, A levels and degree subject. As a graduate, some schools completely ignore GCSEs and/or A levels, some do not. Some specify acceptable degree subjects, some do not. Schools also have varying policies on A level resits. You really do need to contact each school and find out their individual requirements, otherwise you risk your application being rejected at the first pass.



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    Thanks for the very helpful information.
    Where have you found that the NHS fund GEM? I just read that it is supported by Student Finance England, to pay back at a later date (or something similar, been a while since I looked).
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    (Original post by HawkFlight)
    Yes, realise you didn't say medicine wasn't UG level. Just stating it, as some people get confused with GEP being a graduate level degree.

    I've heard nothing from any med school re: GEP being discontinued. Honestly can't think it likely; however, with the funding pressures in the NHS, the additional funding provided for this route may be more limited in future years, with an increased number of grads applying to the 5 year courses.

    Re your question about the course... I'm loving it!!! Everything I expected it to be, and the best career move I've made (as a somewhat older grad, with a previous career behind me).


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    That's great to hear!
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Thanks for the very helpful information.
    Where have you found that the NHS fund GEM? I just read that it is supported by Student Finance England, to pay back at a later date (or something similar, been a while since I looked).
    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...s-in-medicine/

    I don't expect the rules to remain static... Budget pressures are everywhere!


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    (Original post by HawkFlight)
    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...s-in-medicine/

    I don't expect the rules to remain static... Budget pressures are everywhere!


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    "If you are starting your course in the academic year 2014/15 and 2015/16, you will have to fund the first £3,465 of your tuition fees in the first year. In the subsequent years of your course, the NHS Bursary scheme will pay £3,465 towards your tuition fees. Throughout the course, eligible students will be able to receive a Student Loan Company loan to cover the difference between £3,465 and the tuition charges of their universities, to a maximum charge of £9,000."

    Not too bad but still fairly expensive. Especially already owing 10k to SFE for my undergraduate! Another 20k would hurt! If its still there in like 4 years then I may be all for it haha!
 
 
 
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