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Do you need a degree in maths to become a maths teacher? Watch

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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    thanks but isnt it more hard to get a job in private schools?
    they do tend to attract the talented teachers :dontknow:
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I think you should discard a lot of people's opinions of their teachers... Obviously I don't know how old their teachers are, but many of them would have done their degree and their teaching qualification PGCE or TeachFirst, or something or the other quite a long time ago.

    To become a qualified teacher in the subject you wish to teach, your degree should consist of at least 50% of the subject you wish to teach. So if you were going to teach Maths and did an Engineering degree, that degree should have at least 50% of the modules should be in Maths or equivalent. Physics is also an acceptable one too. However, I don't understand why a Physics teacher would want to teach Maths and not Physics is beyond me.

    For someone who has a Creative Writing or Journalism degree are invited (by PGCE) to apply for an English PGCE but, they will be at a slight disadvantage to that of someone who has English Language and English Lit joints or single honours degree in English. So perhaps this applies to physics degree when wanting to become a maths teacher.

    So, really as long as your degree is worth 50% of the subject you wish to teach, then it will be fine (in this day-and-age)
    so a biology degree wouldnt contain 50% maths im guessing its because i love gcse maths however a level maths is a lot different and i dont study further maths to study it at university, i also like biology so im thinking of studying biology however, thinking about jobs id like to do teaching, but cant imagine teaching science in a lab, id find it much easier to teach maths at gcse as its fixed methods to teach, i wouldnt mind doing biology teaching and then switching to maths teaching at the same school if thats more acceptable?
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    (Original post by the bear)
    they do tend to attract the talented teachers :dontknow:
    lol so if i dont have a degree n the subject i wanna teach i wont look that talented right
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    so a biology degree wouldnt contain 50% maths im guessing its because i love gcse maths however a level maths is a lot different and i dont study further maths to study it at university, i also like biology so im thinking of studying biology however, thinking about jobs id like to do teaching, but cant imagine teaching science in a lab, id find it much easier to teach maths at gcse as its fixed methods to teach, i wouldnt mind doing biology teaching and then switching to maths teaching at the same school if thats more acceptable?
    Well Biology would contain a lot of things; human biology, zoology, geography, botany, human and animal psychology, medicine, toxicology, etc etc. Depending on the modules though. But I do know, biology degrees do not have a major fix on maths like physics or chemistry degrees do.

    Not all universities require you to study Further Maths. You can study Maths, Economics and Biology or Maths, Physics, Biology and still get accepted in a Maths degree, literally. Maths degrees do require some to have at least Chemistry or Physics if Further Maths isn't offered. But this isn't liable to all.

    If you would like to become a teacher, your aspirations for teaching shouldn't be based on whether teaching maths or biology will be harder than the other. I know I want to become a teacher because I want to pass down the inspiration of teaching and the love of my subject that my year 11 teacher and A-level English teacher gave to me. I love the thought of the fact that I can make a student enjoy, love, respect the subject that I fell in love for is just awe-inspiring. That should be your motivation, not "because it's easier to teach".

    Okay so this is how it would go: you do your A-levels in Maths, Biology and another. Pick Biology degree, then you would do a PGCE in Secondary Science, with Biology as your specialist subject. Then on your timetable, you will have pretty much year 7-10 classes. Depending on the school (some schools allow teachers who have Physics degree only teach KS3, KS4 and KS5 Physics, whilst other schools allow Physics teacher to teach science at KS3) so a physics teacher would teach a bit of biology, chemistry and physics at KS3. It's the same as an English teacher who has a degree in pure English Lit. They would need some experience teaching Language KS3 and KS4 just for teaching experience and depending on timetabling and departmental needs of the school.

    Once you have your PGCE, by qualification, you can teach pretty much ANY subject. What a PGCE does is allow you to know HOW to teach, with a focus on your subject. So you become a specialist teacher of Physics, for example. So if you were really good at teaching Biology and you went to your boss (the Head) to say you wanted to teach Maths (start with KS3) it is his/she's decision to say yes or no. But your particular school might now allow you to put Maths on your teaching timetable because you have so much Biology and science to teach.
    This happened to my Year 11 teacher. She told us she did her degree in English and Drama. She did her PGCE English, with Drama specialism. She had been teaching for 5 years since getting her PGCE. For 2 years in the school she used to teach KS3 and A-level Drama alongside English. However because the English Department were short of staffed, she had to take up more English classes, thus not being able to carry on in teaching drama.
    There is a shortage of Physics teachers, whilst there are many Biology teachers. There is a shortage of Maths teachers too, but it is becoming steadily popular amongst young prospective teachers.

    Feel free to ask me questions and feel free to give me a good rep too
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Well Biology would contain a lot of things; human biology, zoology, geography, botany, human and animal psychology, medicine, toxicology, etc etc. Depending on the modules though. But I do know, biology degrees do not have a major fix on maths like physics or chemistry degrees do.

    Not all universities require you to study Further Maths. You can study Maths, Economics and Biology or Maths, Physics, Biology and still get accepted in a Maths degree, literally. Maths degrees do require some to have at least Chemistry or Physics if Further Maths isn't offered. But this isn't liable to all.

    If you would like to become a teacher, your aspirations for teaching shouldn't be based on whether teaching maths or biology will be harder than the other. I know I want to become a teacher because I want to pass down the inspiration of teaching and the love of my subject that my year 11 teacher and A-level English teacher gave to me. I love the thought of the fact that I can make a student enjoy, love, respect the subject that I fell in love for is just awe-inspiring. That should be your motivation, not "because it's easier to teach".

    Okay so this is how it would go: you do your A-levels in Maths, Biology and another. Pick Biology degree, then you would do a PGCE in Secondary Science, with Biology as your specialist subject. Then on your timetable, you will have pretty much year 7-10 classes. Depending on the school (some schools allow teachers who have Physics degree only teach KS3, KS4 and KS5 Physics, whilst other schools allow Physics teacher to teach science at KS3) so a physics teacher would teach a bit of biology, chemistry and physics at KS3. It's the same as an English teacher who has a degree in pure English Lit. They would need some experience teaching Language KS3 and KS4 just for teaching experience and depending on timetabling and departmental needs of the school.

    Once you have your PGCE, by qualification, you can teach pretty much ANY subject. What a PGCE does is allow you to know HOW to teach, with a focus on your subject. So you become a specialist teacher of Physics, for example. So if you were really good at teaching Biology and you went to your boss (the Head) to say you wanted to teach Maths (start with KS3) it is his/she's decision to say yes or no. But your particular school might now allow you to put Maths on your teaching timetable because you have so much Biology and science to teach.
    This happened to my Year 11 teacher. She told us she did her degree in English and Drama. She did her PGCE English, with Drama specialism. She had been teaching for 5 years since getting her PGCE. For 2 years in the school she used to teach KS3 and A-level Drama alongside English. However because the English Department were short of staffed, she had to take up more English classes, thus not being able to carry on in teaching drama.
    There is a shortage of Physics teachers, whilst there are many Biology teachers. There is a shortage of Maths teachers too, but it is becoming steadily popular amongst young prospective teachers.

    Feel free to ask me questions and feel free to give me a good rep too
    thanks but what i mean is i do love biology but i like learning it because it fascinates me ,however i think im able to explain maths better to other people as in lessons i find it easy to help friends in maths but in biology i find it hard to explain content even though i like and understand it, another concern is that im absolutely rubbish at physics also i did get good gcses , i wouldnt want to teach physics till yr 9
    ps ive used up my good rep for today shall do later
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    lol so if i dont have a degree n the subject i wanna teach i wont look that talented right
    Well, there's a lot of reasons why Private Schools hire teachers. "Talented" in this sense to me could mean their titles they have such as "Professor" or "Dr". A lot of private schools like to have these types of teachers has it brings in a lot of interest from parents to think "oh, my son will be taught by a teacher who has a PhD!"

    Some normal teachers do get into private schools because of experience, and teachers can apply through a threshold to be teacher of excellence, etc, etc. and many years as a HoD with outstanding results and leadership skills etc.

    However, I know very little on private schools and how their system works.
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    thanks but what i mean is i do love biology but i like learning it because it fascinates me ,however i think im able to explain maths better to other people as in lessons i find it easy to help friends in maths but in biology i find it hard to explain content even though i like and understand it, another concern is that im absolutely rubbish at physics also i did get good gcses , i wouldnt want to teach physics till yr 9
    ps ive used up my good rep for today shall do later

    So, to me, you sound like you lack confidence in Biology. Which you do need in teaching. However, helping a friend out in lesson is completely different to teaching a class full of students. PGCE and other teacher training qualifications help you home in your and expand your skills. And don't forget, when you take A-level, you will find ways that will help you explain and understand biology. And uni also will help with this, so don't feel like you will forever be unable to explain biology because that confidence comes with time and patience and most importantly, understanding.
    See, the fact that you just said you love Biology and it fascinates you tells me your heart is already going towards Biology and not Maths.

    The truth be told: I had always loved English Language and Literature. However, I was really bad at Literature. I never did GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature. I just did the "dumbed down" version of it; GCSE English. So the exam was 2hrs testing both a bit of non-fiction/media text and 2 questions of Romeo and Juliet.

    My year 11 teacher told me that I would be fine studying both English A-levels separately however, I would find Lang harder but more enjoyable whilst I would find Lit boring. I decided to go for both, knowing that I loved Language more than I did Literature. I was always naturally better at Language because understanding words and their connections to one another were a lot easier to me, than understanding how a writer uses words to achieve their effect in a novel. However, after just completing my A-levels, last year when I was applying to uni, most of my courses 3/5 were English Literature degrees, and the remaining two were just English degrees, with a bit of both Lit and Lang in them. So in hindsight, I always thought I'd go further with Language, but I actually enjoyed my A2 studies in Lit than Lang and my English teacher told me that was the most important thing. If I enjoyed Lit, then I should pick that. A friend of mine who is also a young English teacher, said that just because I got higher grade in Language, doesn't mean I'm bad at Literature, it just taking time for me to get into my stride which will all develop at uni.

    I was in your position at Year 11 (have no idea what year you are in now) but your ideas about your chosen/destined future can really change once you do A-levels. So basically, pick the subject you enjoy most, not what you necessarily find easy. Also, if you find a subject you love and you also find it a challenge, that should be something you should go towards and not shy away. If you go towards it, you are unlocking your potential
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    So, to me, you sound like you lack confidence in Biology. Which you do need in teaching. However, helping a friend out in lesson is completely different to teaching a class full of students. PGCE and other teacher training qualifications help you home in your and expand your skills. And don't forget, when you take A-level, you will find ways that will help you explain and understand biology. And uni also will help with this, so don't feel like you will forever be unable to explain biology because that confidence comes with time and patience and most importantly, understanding.
    See, the fact that you just said you love Biology and it fascinates you tells me your heart is already going towards Biology and not Maths.

    The truth be told: I had always loved English Language and Literature. However, I was really bad at Literature. I never did GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature. I just did the "dumbed down" version of it; GCSE English. So the exam was 2hrs testing both a bit of non-fiction/media text and 2 questions of Romeo and Juliet.

    My year 11 teacher told me that I would be fine studying both English A-levels separately however, I would find Lang harder but more enjoyable whilst I would find Lit boring. I decided to go for both, knowing that I loved Language more than I did Literature. I was always naturally better at Language because understanding words and their connections to one another were a lot easier to me, than understanding how a writer uses words to achieve their effect in a novel. However, after just completing my A-levels, last year when I was applying to uni, most of my courses 3/5 were English Literature degrees, and the remaining two were just English degrees, with a bit of both Lit and Lang in them. So in hindsight, I always thought I'd go further with Language, but I actually enjoyed my A2 studies in Lit than Lang and my English teacher told me that was the most important thing. If I enjoyed Lit, then I should pick that. A friend of mine who is also a young English teacher, said that just because I got higher grade in Language, doesn't mean I'm bad at Literature, it just taking time for me to get into my stride which will all develop at uni.

    I was in your position at Year 11 (have no idea what year you are in now) but your ideas about your chosen/destined future can really change once you do A-levels. So basically, pick the subject you enjoy most, not what you necessarily find easy. Also, if you find a subject you love and you also find it a challenge, that should be something you should go towards and not shy away. If you go towards it, you are unlocking your potential
    thanks thats really motivating im doing as now so i need to decide quick
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    Yes it is


    We had a guy who had a degree in CS
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    is it possible to become a maths teacher with a degree in a different subject?
    My teacher did an engineering degree and teaches engineering and further maths A-levels
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    (Original post by yo radical one)
    Yes it is


    We had a guy who had a degree in CS
    this might be a stupid question but whats CS?
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    (Original post by Clarinet)
    My teacher did an engineering degree and teaches engineering and further maths A-levels
    oh but thats quite a mathsy degree, biology isnt really i guess
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    this might be a stupid question but whats CS?

    Not at all and it's computer science
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    (Original post by yo radical one)
    Not at all and it's computer science
    oh ok thats quite amathsy degree though isnt?:confused:
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    oh but thats quite a mathsy degree, biology isnt really i guess
    Silly question, but why don't you want to become a biology teacher? :confused:
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    oh ok thats quite amathsy degree though isnt?:confused:
    They'll tell you it is

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    The Head of Maths in my school has a degree in English.. I'm not sure how that works out tbh
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    One of the Physics teachers at my old school had a degree and a PhD in Chemistry.

    Another one of the Physics teachers there was probably better at Maths than the entire Maths department, and could have easily been a Maths teacher if he'd wanted to. The Maths teachers used to ask him for help if they were stuck on something.

    And one of my Chemistry teachers actually used to teach Maths and Statistics lectures at Oxford while he was studying for his Chemistry PhD.


    The point being that there does not seem to be a strictly enforced rule that you need to have a degree in the same subject that you're teaching. Perhaps it helps to have a degree in a similar or overlapping subject, but the most important thing is that you are proficient enough in the subject to be able to teach it well.
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    (Original post by cchocolate)
    so its not possible to teach up to gcse with a biology degree and training?
    The procedure (at the moment) would be to apply for an initial teacher training course, e.g. PGCE and the provider would either accept you with your existing degree - supposedly the benchmark for this is >=50% maths content on the degree or they'd make you an offer based on the successful completion of a maths Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course like this http://www.ioe.mmu.ac.uk/pgce/docs/M...0for%20web.pdf

    (or the PGCE provider could just turn you down flat)

    because maths is a shortage subject, maths SKE's currently attract a burasry.

    in subjects which aren't deemed shortage subjects, e.g. English everyone gets a lot more picky, which is why you don't hear so many stories about people with non-English degrees training to become English teachers, there's already more than enough English graduates chasing those jobs.
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    (Original post by Clarinet)
    Silly question, but why don't you want to become a biology teacher? :confused:
    not a silly question, people must be like why on earth would u study biology at uni and consider teaching maths lol
    its because i find maths easier than biology and can explain it better to others than explaining biology as its fixed methods whereas biology is more wide, also when i imagine teaching, i see myself in a normal classroom not in a lab with experiements and if i were to become a biology teacer that would mean teaching bio chem and PHYSICS (ARGH) up to year 9 which i would be hopeless at and wouldnt enjoy
    however biology fascinates me more than maths
 
 
 
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