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Should the government scrap the TV licence fee? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should the TV licence be scrapped?
    Yes
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    65.52%
    No
    10
    34.48%

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    Yeah, Sky/Virgin are priced extortionately, but bear in mind that they are opt-in services. It's the fact that, regardless of whether we watch anything on the BBC, we don't have the option of not paying for their services that's really ridiculous... AND the BBC spend their money stupidly. They send out two or three times more reporters and crew to cover things in comparison with other channels.

    The BBC was a great British institution, but nowadays I see it as daylight robbery. They can only get away with charging the licence fee because it started such a long time ago - if the BBC set up now and started demanding everyone to pay for it no one would stand for it.
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    I'm always on the page and it's my most trusted source for breaking news, so I'd miss it even if I knew how to stream illegally, which I don't
    I do like the BBC (bit lefty on foreign affairs especially but still mostly factual) but its business model needs to change.
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    I'm not paying for a London based news when I don't give a flying **** about London. I want to know what is happening in the countryside. However the only BBC program that even vaguely represents the countryside, is countryfile. Which is what the countryside looks like from a London point of view. So a big fairy tale wrapped in cotton wool.
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    I don't see how the license fee can survive the future of television. Sooner or later the mobile phone companies will want the frequency range currently occupied by digital TV, by that time they will use the justification that most people get their TV programmes through the internet, either through something like Netflix or a direct service from the broadcaster (4OD, etc...). I suspect the BBC will end up running a subscription service similar to Netflix where you sign up for an account and pay them a monthly fee for access to their programmes.

    When I was younger I loved television like a best friend, I still enjoy traditional TV but I think TV in it's current format only has 10 years max.
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    (Original post by retrogamer104)
    I don't see how the license fee can survive the future of television. Sooner or later the mobile phone companies will want the frequency range currently occupied by digital TV, by that time they will use the justification that most people get their TV programmes through the internet, either through something like Netflix or a direct service from the broadcaster (4OD, etc...). I suspect the BBC will end up running a subscription service similar to Netflix where you sign up for an account and pay them a monthly fee for access to their programmes.

    When I was younger I loved television like a best friend, I still enjoy traditional TV but I think TV in it's current format only has 10 years max.
    That's basically what the license fee is though...Except you can watch without paying after it's gone live. I also think the frequency argument is a bit iffy.


    Tbh, the BBC needs funding and I would rather have it as it is now than being paid for through tax, those that want the service pay for the service. If somebody doesn't want to pay the license fee then they just don't pay it. I barely ever watch TV, and the few things I do watch I'm fine waiting an hour to watch it online.
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    The BBC are like any other state organ - self-entitled and incredibly wasteful.

    This doesn't mean it's all bad. Personally, I would be in favour of cutting the licence fee in half by 2020. Get rid of all the really overpriced non-talent and strip out all the nonsense services. Some of the services like Radio 5 are really bloated with way too many staff and too many mediocre presenters on way too much money. Force them to get their house in order and concentrate on running a few core services well, rather than a lot of rubbish.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    That's basically what the license fee is though...Except you can watch without paying after it's gone live. I also think the frequency argument is a bit iffy.


    Tbh, the BBC needs funding and I would rather have it as it is now than being paid for through tax, those that want the service pay for the service. If somebody doesn't want to pay the license fee then they just don't pay it. I barely ever watch TV, and the few things I do watch I'm fine waiting an hour to watch it online.
    At my uni house, I didn't have a TV license as I didn't watch live TV. But not having a TV license meant that I received letters from the licensing agency telling me that I may be watching TV illegally. Despite telling them through suggested channels that I do not require a TV license, the letters continued to arrive. It didn't happen frequently enough for me to get annoyed but I'd rather it hadn't happened.

    I get what your saying about the current scheme, but the current scheme is based upon the idea that the BBC cannot stop an individual, who doesn't own a license, from tuning in. With an online viewing system, they could easily restrict access to those who have paid.

    The frequency argument is based upon the fact that analog TV was switched off to make space for the 4G mobile internet spectrum, amongst other things. I don't have any evidence to say that the same thing will happen to digital TV, it's just I can see that at some point in the future there will probably be a convincing argument to switch off digital TV in order to use the spectrum for something else.

    I agree that the current system is far superior to a tax.
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    (Original post by retrogamer104)
    At my uni house, I didn't have a TV license as I didn't watch live TV. But not having a TV license meant that I received letters from the licensing agency telling me that I may be watching TV illegally. Despite telling them through suggested channels that I do not require a TV license, the letters continued to arrive. It didn't happen frequently enough for me to get annoyed but I'd rather it hadn't happened.

    I get what your saying about the current scheme, but the current scheme is based upon the idea that the BBC cannot stop an individual, who doesn't own a license, from tuning in. With an online viewing system, they could easily restrict access to those who have paid.

    The frequency argument is based upon the fact that analog TV was switched off to make space for the 4G mobile internet spectrum, amongst other things. I don't have any evidence to say that the same thing will happen to digital TV, it's just I can see that at some point in the future there will probably be a convincing argument to switch off digital TV in order to use the spectrum for something else.

    I agree that the current system is far superior to a tax.
    But was switching of Analogue just as much because it was completely redundant given digital and just plain bad in comparison. Presumably, they have systems in place which given them an idea if there are people who may be tuning in illegally and that system will throw up false reports, such as in your situation.

    To turn it off in favour of something else would require the death of TV, which I doubt is happening any time soon, even if viewership is declining. I suppose I could see them switching off their terrestrial broadcasts and piggybacking on the cable/satellite providers, but the negotiation required would probably make it a last resort. I wonder, what percentage of people actually still use the terrestrial broadcasts and don't have Sky or equivalent?
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    I believe it should be kept as it is. The news is good as is some of their docu-dramas.

    I think there is plenty of room for improvement especially with regard to content, gaining better value for their money and talent development. I do think in future it should also have some ads to it but that must also result in less repeats where currently there simply seems to be far too many reruns of old junk crap.
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    I would hate it to go the way of other commercial channels and have adverts. Beyond that... not sure.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    I'm not paying for a London based news when I don't give a flying **** about London. I want to know what is happening in the countryside. However the only BBC program that even vaguely represents the countryside, is countryfile. Which is what the countryside looks like from a London point of view. So a big fairy tale wrapped in cotton wool.
    Countryfile is an absolute joke. A very poor representation of rural Britain and rural people, just one long hour of patronising drivel.

    The only BBC program I actually like is Gardeners World. It is one of the few things from the BBC that genuinely doesn't seem to be nudging any political agenda in the background, and Monty Don is something of an idol of mine too.

    The rest of the BBC can **** off, and it can take its mafioso protection racket licence fee with it. It should become a subscription based service, in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    But was switching of Analogue just as much because it was completely redundant given digital and just plain bad in comparison. Presumably, they have systems in place which given them an idea if there are people who may be tuning in illegally and that system will throw up false reports, such as in your situation.
    They can't tell if somebody is receiving the signal. They say they can but it simply isn't possible.

    They would have to send somebody to physically see you watching TV for them to know.
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    If they scrapped the dross BBC news service or had less of a blatant agenda like any other mainstream media outlet, I'd be more than happy to pay double.
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    I'd pay the licence fee for R6, R4 and BBC4 alone.

    In fact I'd like to see more of the licence fee going to the radio service and less to shows like strictly (which is too similar to commercial content to justify the tv subsidy)
 
 
 
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