Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Why don't or wouldn't you vote? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Why don't/wouldn't you vote?
    I do vote (please state why)
    76
    65.52%
    It doesn't interest me
    6
    5.17%
    I don't care about who wins
    7
    6.03%
    I can't choose - there's more than 1 party I like
    3
    2.59%
    I don't know enough about their policies
    5
    4.31%
    I don't think my vote will make a difference
    20
    17.24%
    I can't be bothered
    11
    9.48%
    Other (please state)
    12
    10.34%

    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pane123)
    When people refer to tax as I did, the assumption is that it's income tax.
    You are still paying tax and have the right to a vote. Tax is tax, no matter where it comes from.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I don't really know much about the parties, and even so what I've learned FPTP is an awful voting system, if I do vote, it'll be UKIP though.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    You are still paying tax and have the right to a vote. Tax is tax, no matter where it comes from.
    Ah right, I didn't explain very well. I don't vote because not paying tax means I can keep myself to myself and politics don't affect my income. Sorry, my fault.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pane123)
    Ah right, I didn't explain very well. I don't vote because not paying tax means I can keep myself to myself and politics don't affect my income. Sorry, my fault.
    Fair enough.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I see all the parties as deplorable, corporate-pandering and standardless but I still vote, even if to just try and get the least of the evils.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    18
    ReputationRep:
    A few people (including me) have mentioned the first past the post voting system.

    I have heard the argument that FPTP can induce voter apathy, as it is nearly impossible to achieve anything with protest voting under that system, and they feel their vote makes no difference because of it. Does anyone think this argument holds water? Would a more proportional voting system encourage more people to vote?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SocialistIC)
    I see all the parties as deplorable, corporate-pandering and standardless but I still vote, even if to just try and get the least of the evils.
    You're only encouraging them.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Frankly, I don't know enough about the majority of the policies to be able to say one party is better than another. Parties stand for so many things that it would take me forever to research each individual issue, formulate an opinion, and then review what each party stands for in terms of that one issue. I'd have to do that hundreds of times to actually know anything, I would imagine. I can't imagine many other people are doing that, so what are we actually voting for? Simple: the majority of people vote based on not wanting party x to win, thus having to vote for party y. Chances are, that'll be based on fewer than a handful of their policies, or perhaps just because one of the leaders "looks like a ****". You want me to vote in a system like that? Yeah, no thanks.

    I would vote if we voted on individual issues, as then I wouldn't have to worry about the rest of the things. This would get people thinking about the issue at hand, and voting for that reason, hopefully. I would vote in the current system if one issue alone was compelling enough to vote on.
    • Reporter Team
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I vote because the alternative is bleak.

    I'm a bit split on who I vote for because I genuinely like policies from all parties, and MPs differ from area to area - sometimes it's difficult to weigh up the worth of having a good local MP vis-á-vis a national government you have the electoral clout to help form.

    I like the radical environmental policies of the Greens, the Lib Dems for their raising of the tax threshold to £10,000 which saves money for millions of the lowest paid and and their graduate tax was progressive too. Labour create the NHS and look like they have attractive policies on the railways and welfare, and UKIP for their grammar schools and defence of the Royal Mail. There are bad points about every party.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I had to sit through a session about why we should vote when I was in college. The video said 'student fees went up because students didn't vote. EMA got scrapped because students didn't vote', etc. The problem was, students don't know what to vote for because it's either too complicated, or there is no party that supports us. The Liberal Democrats lied to us the last Election, so why should we trust them, as well as the other parties?

    Our constituency has just been introduced to the Socialist Party, who wants to abolish the Bedroom Tax, among other things. If I were to vote, I'd probably vote for them, but I know it wouldn't make a difference, because it would only be either Labour or Conservatives that win the election, therefore I see no point.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Yep, I vote for whoever represents my views best.
    • Wiki Support Team
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I think voting is very important, and I think even if you can't find someone to represent you, then spoiling a ballot is a must. People often claim that it doesn't have an effect, but that's a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you're not voting then no-one's going to hear you and they certainly won't give a damn about you either. Old people do vote, in staggering numbers, and everyone always listens to them.

    We all have a choice:
    >Don't vote, and don't get heard.
    >Do vote, and possibly , just maybe, get heard.

    It's probably unlikely that our own individual votes make a difference. No matter who you vote, the government always gets in! But it doesn't cost anything to vote, and together it can have an effect. So what's to lose? We've witnessed a rightward shift in our political scene in recent years, and that started at the ballot box.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I am going to vote, but only to tactically vote against the conservatives. I hate New Labour with a passion, but the Tories are just a bit worse.

    There are many reasons why people don't vote and don't think voting matters, I'll list key reasons:

    1) We have a first past the post voting system (FPTP), this causes minority rule, the spoiler effect, tactical voting and gerrymandering
    2) Regardless of who you vote for they are neo-liberal in some way, anybody who claims New Labour to be left-wing socialists is truly ignorant
    3) It's basically a two party system (not as bad as the US though), New Labour or Tory
    4) Both parties are broadchurch, which means they try to appeal to as many people as possible, which is probably why they are so f*cking indecisive on Question Time
    5) The parties people like have no chance of gaining seats (Green Party, Social democrats etc.)
    6) Tony Blair, Cameron and Clegg have shown us that in a representative democracy that once being elected they really can do whatever they want, that includes lying and diverting from their manifesto
    7) Democracy which means people power, is rather non existent in that, a representative democracy offers the one in 4-5 year chance to vote for a candidate who won't represent you, but their party and has no obligation to listen to you or push forward bills, referendums are rare and usually people aren't informed enough to make decisions on such referendum

    Money plays a big role in elections and just shows how these parties suck up to big companies (US being an extreme case)
    8) The House of Lords is incredibly undemocratic and problematic for passing legislature

    9) Statistically there is a correlation in an increase in voter apathy after Tony Blair's election in 1997s, turnout drops after each election, showing how much of a neo-liberal, stealth Tory he was.

    That's what has come to mind so far, if you have anything to add then please do share.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by n00)
    You're only encouraging them.
    Not voting for them won't just make them go away. You have to vote for whoever has the best policies to push the other ones in to adopting better policies - even if it's a party that won't get in like the Greens.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    Other: I'd get put on the electoral register and I might get called up for jury service.
    That doesn't make a difference any more.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Don't vote because I don't agree with the entire structure of neo-liberal 'democracy', voting in it only propagates the oppression and tyranny innate within said system.

    I am on the electoral role though, so decision comes down to spoil my ballot or spoiling as many ballots as possible.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xloisx)
    That doesn't make a difference any more.
    It doesn't? I thought they chose people from the electoral register.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    It doesn't? I thought they chose people from the electoral register.
    Actually, I think that you're right. I recently read that now you can be chosen if you've applied for a provisional licence, got a mortgage, done any tax returns and a number of other things.. But I just Googled it to make sure, and the only evidence I can find for that is in the US.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Voting in a nutshell:

    Do you;

    1) Want to be bossed around, told how to live your life and generally be treated like a child by people in blue ties?

    2) Want to be boosed around, told how to live your life and generally be treated like a child by people in red ties?

    3) Want to be bossed around, told how to live your life and generally be treated like a child by people in yellow ties?


    Hooray for choices.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RFowler)
    A few people (including me) have mentioned the first past the post voting system.

    I have heard the argument that FPTP can induce voter apathy, as it is nearly impossible to achieve anything with protest voting under that system, and they feel their vote makes no difference because of it. Does anyone think this argument holds water? Would a more proportional voting system encourage more people to vote?
    Yes.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.